Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Why are my temps the same after upgrading case?

Last response: in Components
Share
August 3, 2012 3:20:55 PM

Last night I took all the components out of my roswell challenger and put it into a NZXT phantom. My temps were always good, but I wanted them better. My GPU sat idle at about 38-40 and my CPU 33-35. The phantom is supposed to have better airflow and bigger fans so I thought it would for sure lower my temps. After cable managing all my wires to the best I could, my CPU sits at 35 while my GPU sits at 40. I can't seem to find a reason why a bigger and better pc case wouldn't alter the temps in the slightest. Any reasons why this may be? Oh and I'm using Speccy for temp readings.

More about : temps upgrading case

a c 248 ) Power supply
August 3, 2012 3:24:57 PM

What was the ambient (room) temperature when you recorded the temperatures for each case?
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
August 3, 2012 8:31:41 PM

They havent changed because you have changed anything on thier cooling solutions. Thier heatsinks, fans, and fanspeeds are still the same thus they are running at the same temperature as before. This shows you had adequate cooling before the new case - at idle.

Did you do any testing under load?
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 276 ) Power supply
August 3, 2012 8:45:17 PM

Idle temperatures are meaningless comparisons. The temperature of the air in the case at idle is going to be very very close to the temperature of the air outside the case, you just aren't generating much heat that needs to be dealt with, so improving airflow through the case can't bring temperatures any lower if it was already the same inside and outside.

Load temps are the only really controllable ones, and the only ones that really matter. At load you are dealing with a couple hundred watts of heat being dissipated so the case ambient temp might get 10 C above the outside air, and moving to a better ventilated case might bring that difference down to only 7 C, which will only result in a 3 C drop in CPU and GPU temperature which is hard to measure precisely due to room temperature variations.

The only time changing cases will really help is if you go from a really crappy case(some dells and HPs with only a single fan) to a large well ventilated case. Imagine going from a crappy HP mid tower to a HAF X, but if you don't have large power hungry hardware in there that single fan was likely sufficient anyway so you would still see a minor difference.
m
0
l
August 10, 2012 7:45:29 PM

JohnnyLucky said:
What was the ambient (room) temperature when you recorded the temperatures for each case?
Sorry I didn't respond, my email didn't notify me of anyone answering the question and I just assumed no one helped. It was probably 76 in the room. I realize now from the posts above this one that bigger case =/= better temps so I'm at ease now. Thanks anyways.
m
0
l
August 10, 2012 7:47:53 PM

popatim said:
They havent changed because you have changed anything on thier cooling solutions. Thier heatsinks, fans, and fanspeeds are still the same thus they are running at the same temperature as before. This shows you had adequate cooling before the new case - at idle.

Did you do any testing under load?
Again, sorry I didn't respond in time. And I did not know that. I had just assumed that since the case had bigger and more fans that it would cool it more. Good to know though.

I haven't done any stress tests. Should I?
m
0
l
August 10, 2012 7:50:53 PM

hunter315 said:
Idle temperatures are meaningless comparisons. The temperature of the air in the case at idle is going to be very very close to the temperature of the air outside the case, you just aren't generating much heat that needs to be dealt with, so improving airflow through the case can't bring temperatures any lower if it was already the same inside and outside.

Load temps are the only really controllable ones, and the only ones that really matter. At load you are dealing with a couple hundred watts of heat being dissipated so the case ambient temp might get 10 C above the outside air, and moving to a better ventilated case might bring that difference down to only 7 C, which will only result in a 3 C drop in CPU and GPU temperature which is hard to measure precisely due to room temperature variations.

The only time changing cases will really help is if you go from a really crappy case(some dells and HPs with only a single fan) to a large well ventilated case. Imagine going from a crappy HP mid tower to a HAF X, but if you don't have large power hungry hardware in there that single fan was likely sufficient anyway so you would still see a minor difference.
Oh okay. Kind of a bummer that I switched cases then, but for only 40 bucks extra, the case is definitely worth it from the aesthetics alone even if the temp advantages are lesser. Quick question if you come back to this thread, why would anyone upgrade their cases then besides the obvious reason of space? It seems by what you said that the low end cases won't have much in difference cooling wise than a more expensive case.
m
0
l
August 10, 2012 8:15:57 PM

The comuter cases now has basiclly the same priniccpal. They have two stages on cooling the computer insides. They draw air from outside to inside by using front facing case fan and maybe a side fan. The cpu cooling system will grab the air and blow it over the cpu to make the temperatures lower and draw the heat to back of the case or to the top.

If you bought a computer case with the power supply at the top of the case. This will prevent air from escaping. The air will get trap between the heatsink and power supply.
m
0
l
!