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Constant BSOD, tried basically everything, very strange

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April 21, 2012 11:32:30 PM

Basically I built a pc not long ago;
i7 2600K
Standard heat sink
8GB Gskill Ripjaws (2*4) @ 1600Mhz
Corsair 750W Modular psu
Sapphire Radeon 6950 w/ 2GB of vm
P8Z68-V-LE mobo
OCZ Agility 3 80GB SSD (OS drive)
A 500GB HDD that I salvaged from a broken ExHDD
Windows 7 x64

I'm getting extremely frequent BSOD's (minimum 1 per hour, maximum probably around 10) typically error 124 or less frequently 3b SYSTEM_SERVICER_EXCEPTION but over time I've had what would seem like every code there is, I've almost exhausted all options and I am at my wits end with this PC

I get the problems on my HDD OS and SSD OS the same

Things I have tried/done;

Mem Checked RAM multiple times, booted with only one at a time and in seperate banks each time - No memory errors, and tested fine

Flashed bios to multiple different versions including rolling back to more 'stable' versions all to no avail

Replaced board on warranty

Ran without network adapter (no ethernet either), still bsod

Replaced wireless adapter anyway still to no avail

Purchased new keyboard, mouse and monitor

Put a POST card in, it didnt detect anything

Stress tested GPU, CPU and RAM on maximum load with different programs such as prime95 etc.. no bsod it handles it

Temperatures generally aren't a problem

Moved OS over to an brand new SSD incase it was a faulty HDD (ran windows check disk utility, no errors, thought it could be this because this is a fairly old thing I took out of an EX HDD) still bsoding

Tried multiple OS's like; W8 Developers preview, multiple versions of W7 some pirate some legit activated, and a genuine w7 still bsoding

Bought soundcard in hope it was drivers for the onboard audio or something, no avail

Updated drivers for everything countless times no help

Thats all I can think of off the top of my head, may well have done more.

Patterns I have noticed;

No BSOD at all when idling for days at a time

They often appear in chains, i.e I wont really get one for a while (a while with this frequency is like half an hour to an hour) then I'll get one and while loading windows or just after I log on or just after I go to start any program it will crash, I've had this happen 5 times in a row before, HOWEVER this does not mean I get chains every time

Something strange;

I gave it to my friend to look at for a few days, he left it idling for two days with no errors which supports the time when I did this, and then when he started to do things with it like surf the internet etc. guess what, still nothing. It worked fine for him, the only BSOD's he ever got was when he got the temps up to around 98 degrees on all cores with Folding @ Home, and you would expect it to crash at those temps, but other than that he never once got a low temperature low stress blue screen, which I get all the time while doing the least of taxing things, and the only things that changed from my house to his are; monitor, mouse, keyboard, router. I immediately purchased a new keyboard and mouse due to me thinking it could be this as mine were ancient, still to no avail, and my monitor is brand spanking new so I wouldnt have thought that would be the problem



I'm at my wits end with this, any help would REALLY be appreciated


Thanks alot in advance

Harvey
April 22, 2012 12:30:37 AM

A keyboard, mouse and monitor shouldn't cause BSODs. The main differences between your place and you friend's place should be supply voltage (is it clean with a good ground) and the network if you're using an Ethernet port.
Anonymous
April 22, 2012 12:43:05 AM

was there a difference in room temps @ your friends house?
was he using the wireless?
what other differences could there be?
Related resources
April 22, 2012 9:01:50 AM

GhislainG said:
A keyboard, mouse and monitor shouldn't cause BSODs. The main differences between your place and you friend's place should be supply voltage (is it clean with a good ground) and the network if you're using an Ethernet port.


Well all seems to be clean and well, however I'm running this off a long extension cord along with all my other peripherals (speakers,monitor.....) if that could make a difference? I BSOD with my network card disabled and ethernet or no ethernet, my friend had my network card enabled and wasn't getting the problems
April 22, 2012 9:04:31 AM

Anonymous said:
was there a difference in room temps @ your friends house?
was he using the wireless?
what other differences could there be?


About the same tbh, my temps are average - all you would expect from a stock cooler - I usually idle at ~40 degrees C but right now I'm at ~50 C
Yes my network adapter

That's what I'm trying to figure out, but I've thought of all the possible ones I think!
April 22, 2012 10:57:26 AM

0x124 is a hardware error. If you have over-clocked, please reduce the GHz steadily lower to check if it improves. Please check if the voltage is within the manufacturer's range.

You might want to replace the CPU cooler to

http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=HS...

This is the best cooler in the market.

Please read this read to see if it helps.

http://www.sevenforums.com/crashes-debugging/219151-bso...

http://www.sevenforums.com/crashes-debugging/62131-bsod...

April 22, 2012 11:04:28 AM

SSri said:
0x124 is a hardware error. If you have over-clocked, please reduce the GHz steadily lower to check if it improves. Please check if the voltage is within the manufacturer's range.

You might want to replace the CPU cooler to

http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=HS...

This is the best cooler in the market.

Please read this read to see if it helps.

http://www.sevenforums.com/crashes-debugging/219151-bso...

http://www.sevenforums.com/crashes-debugging/62131-bsod...

The best cooling is actually water/oil cooling... not sure if oil does better but some people report it to conduct heat will... Highly recommend you test your hardware's spec or what ever on it... Reinstall Windows but before that, do a full format of the HDD to clean the sector which may cause the BSOD, it happens to me once...
April 22, 2012 12:20:06 PM

I'm curious, are you actually monitoring your CPU temps? As in, keeping the utility open while you perform different tasks? A coworker of mine that says he has lots of build experience has been having the same problem. It turns out it was his thermal compound and/or his technique in applying it. He finds this out after rebuying pretty much everything in his recent build. When I ask him what his new temps are, he just tells me real cool since he bought the best recommended case. FYI, ambient temp will only help so much with the CPU. It's more dependent on your CPU fan/compound.

What type of CPU fan, Compound, and technique are you using? 98C? Were you performing a stress test? That's definitely a BSOD temp. It varies by CPU model, but anything over 80 is really bad isn't it? I get nervous over 34C.

I have my i5 2500K OC'd to 4.5 and I get a avg of 26C for my CPU. I have the same PSU as you, which should be good enough for one GPU. I have the Sapphire 6850.

What does the mouse and keyboard have to do with anything?

With the high temps and the repeated BSOD, you might have already damaged your CPU. Try getting a after market fan and good thermal compound. If you have extra funds, maybe a new CPU.
April 22, 2012 12:32:19 PM

steph- said:
What does the mouse and keyboard have to do with anything?

driver problem i guess... lol...
Im not sure if it's CPU temp because from what he said, it's more likely to be a faulty motherboard otherwise it's his CPU being faulty and shutting down...
April 22, 2012 12:36:15 PM

legendkiller said:
driver problem i guess... lol...
Im not sure if it's CPU temp because from what he said, it's more likely to be a faulty motherboard otherwise it's his CPU being faulty and shutting down...



That's some driver issue.
His CPU is probably pissed off it was overheated so many times. I don't think he mentioned anything about a after market fan or his cooling method for the CPU (Standard Heatsink? the junk it comes with presumably). The most likely issue is the CPU sticking up two fingers and calling it a day. Could be the motherboard, maybe...but I doubt it, unless it wasn't properly grounded and/or it's being shorted by something. That's a good PSU, so I doubt that as well. The cheapest solution is to buy some good compound to reapply properly. If he has $30 more, maybe a new CPU fan.
April 22, 2012 1:17:33 PM

He says it is a standard heat sink, which is probably the one that came with it. That 124 error could be due to many reasons on the hard ware; OC, driver issue, lack of seating of the hardware, inefficient thermal pasting, motherboard, processor. I think he should get a good air cooler, at least (Noctua NH-D14) and a good thermal paste (Artic Silver 5 or Arctic Silver), reseat all the HW and try again.

If you are buying a new thermal compound, you may want to remove the old paste and reapply.

April 22, 2012 1:21:35 PM

harvs899 said:
Well all seems to be clean and well, however I'm running this off a long extension cord along with all my other peripherals (speakers,monitor.....) if that could make a difference? I BSOD with my network card disabled and ethernet or no ethernet, my friend had my network card enabled and wasn't getting the problems
Before reinstalling Windows or replacing the CPU HSF, why don't you connect it to an outlet that provides clean power or use a quality UPS? To what device (make and model) is your Ethernet controller connected to?
April 22, 2012 2:08:49 PM

steph- said:
I'm curious, are you actually monitoring your CPU temps? As in, keeping the utility open while you perform different tasks? A coworker of mine that says he has lots of build experience has been having the same problem. It turns out it was his thermal compound and/or his technique in applying it. He finds this out after rebuying pretty much everything in his recent build. When I ask him what his new temps are, he just tells me real cool since he bought the best recommended case. FYI, ambient temp will only help so much with the CPU. It's more dependent on your CPU fan/compound.

What type of CPU fan, Compound, and technique are you using? 98C? Were you performing a stress test? That's definitely a BSOD temp. It varies by CPU model, but anything over 80 is really bad isn't it? I get nervous over 34C.

I have my i5 2500K OC'd to 4.5 and I get a avg of 26C for my CPU. I have the same PSU as you, which should be good enough for one GPU. I have the Sapphire 6850.

What does the mouse and keyboard have to do with anything?

With the high temps and the repeated BSOD, you might have already damaged your CPU. Try getting a after market fan and good thermal compound. If you have extra funds, maybe a new CPU.


The mouse and keyboard? nothing but why not? I needed new ones anyway, i'm clutching at straws due to me almost exhausting everything I can think of

The temperatures aren't the particularly the problem, I was just mentioning thats the only time he ever got a BSOD which is what you would expect at those temps, but Artic Silver 5, yes I'm actually monitoring them, and im running the stock cooler as I already mentioned, and no it wasn't a stress test it was the Folding @ Home client, look it up, but this is all beyond the point as my temps are never that high doing most things even gaming but yes I understand I need a quality after market cooler anyway, so I can safely say the temps arent the cause of my BSOD's
April 22, 2012 2:10:59 PM

GhislainG said:
Before reinstalling Windows or replacing the CPU HSF, why don't you connect it to an outlet that provides clean power or use a quality UPS? To what device (make and model) is your Ethernet controller connected to?


Tried connecting to a proper socket, to no avail, and I'm not using ethernet
April 22, 2012 2:11:41 PM

legendkiller said:
driver problem i guess... lol...
Im not sure if it's CPU temp because from what he said, it's more likely to be a faulty motherboard otherwise it's his CPU being faulty and shutting down...


Already replaced motherboard and CPU once
April 22, 2012 2:11:59 PM

harvs899 said:
The mouse and keyboard? nothing but why not? I needed new ones anyway, i'm clutching at straws due to me almost exhausting everything I can think of

The temperatures aren't the particularly the problem, I was just mentioning thats the only time he ever got a BSOD which is what you would expect at those temps, but Artic Silver 5, yes I'm actually monitoring them, and im running the stock cooler as I already mentioned, and no it wasn't a stress test it was the Folding @ Home client, look it up, but this is all beyond the point as my temps are never that high doing most things even gaming but yes I understand I need a quality after market cooler anyway, so I can safely say the temps arent the cause of my BSOD's


You might just have a bad CPU, or it went bad at some point. Monitoring your temps, so your avg idle is at what 50C? That's high.

Wait, you replaced the CPU already, but your still getting 50C idle and BSOD? I'm thinking it's your cooling method. Need after market cooler and thermal compound and good technique on applying. Does the standard heatsink connect via a push method, no screws? It might not be connected well or popping up a little, causing air pockets to form and disturbing your seal and compound.
April 22, 2012 2:18:43 PM

steph- said:
You might just have a bad CPU, or it went bad at some point. Monitoring your temps, so your avg idle is at what 50C? That's high.

Wait, you replaced the CPU already, but your still getting 50C idle and BSOD? I'm thinking it's your cooling method. Need after market cooler and thermal compound and good technique on applying. Is the standard heatsink just pushes down to connect?


If that was the case then surely stress testing the cpu would surely cause a crash, I've NEVER directly had a bsod while stress testing cpu, Folding@Home is not a stress test, but it obviously just got my temps too high (higher than stress testing) and at this very minute my average is around 40C, but what do you expect with stock cooler
April 22, 2012 2:21:14 PM

harvs899 said:
If that was the case then surely stress testing the cpu would surely cause a crash, I've NEVER directly had a bsod while stress testing cpu, Folding@Home is not a stress test, but it obviously just got my temps too high (higher than stress testing) and at this very minute my average is around 40C, but what do you expect with stock cooler



I'm just surprised you are using what came with it sense you already spent and are spending so much money on your build and replacement to fix the first build. An after market cooler runs $30 or less and Artic5 maybe $10.

But yes, that's what you should be seeing with the stock cooler.
April 22, 2012 2:23:17 PM

steph- said:
I'm just surprised you are using what came with it sense you already spent and are spending so much money on your build and replacement to fix the first build. An after market cooler runs $30 or less and Artic5 maybe $10.


Very true, 1) are you just generally saying my temps are too high or do you believe they could be the cause of the BSOD's 2) is it worth saving for a bit longer and getting water cooling instead of just a good HS
April 22, 2012 2:28:53 PM

harvs899 said:
Very true, 1) are you just generally saying my temps are too high or do you believe they could be the cause of the BSOD's 2) is it worth saving for a bit longer and getting water cooling instead of just a good HS



Are you overclocking? If not I don't think you need water-cooling, but that's up to you. It could become necessary if you were running more than one GPU w/ your CPU overclocked. You can lower your temps dramatically with a good fan, thermal compound, and installing/applying both well. Lots of times the stock fan pops up, which causes issues with dissipating heat.

If you get an after market fan, make sure you install it correctly (as in, connecting the two and don't lift up, diagonally tighten down and make sure they are all equally tight at the end. Remove all previous compound with 99% alcohol and coffee filter. Make sure all gaps on the heatsink are filled in and you tin your CPU. Apply a line of compound down the middle of the CPU, after both sides are tinned and connect the two without lifting up.

If you aren't overclocking you should get 28C or lower with proper cooling and application. I overclocked to 4.5 and get 26-28C, and that's with a GPU. Like I said previously, a guy I work with stated he was experienced but he was having the same problem as you. He replaced everything and checked the CPU last. It turned out it was his CPU cooling method. He used the stock cooler and thermal compound and probably applied it poorly. I don't know what his avgs temps since he is not very vigilant in checking, citing that his issue was the compound was disappearing (?) and now that he has the best recommended case his cooling is great. Btw, case cooling will only help so much, so I doubt that made The difference.

Another thing to check is your bios settings and your CPU voltage level. Your bios setting might be a issue, but you changed out the mobo right? Then again, your CPU temp might be spiking at odd times, causing BSOD.
April 22, 2012 2:45:34 PM

harvs899 said:
Tried connecting to a proper socket, to no avail, and I'm not using ethernet

It shouldn't crash when running Folding@Home. When the CPU gets really hot, it will throttle and then shutdown if it still can't cool down (unless you disabled something in the BIOS to let it run even if it overheats). I experienced a CPU fan failure on a system and it would eventually shutdown, but it didn't crash.
April 22, 2012 2:45:44 PM

steph- said:
Are you overclocking? If not I don't think you need water-cooling, but that's up to you. It could become necessary if you were running more than one GPU w/ your CPU overclocked. You can lower your temps dramatically with a good fan, thermal compound, and installing/applying both well. Lots of times the stock fan pops up, which causes issues with dissipating heat.

If you get an after market fan, make sure you install it correctly (as in, connecting the two and don't lift up, diagonally tighten down and make sure they are all equally tight at the end. Remove all previous compound with 99% alcohol and coffee filter. Make sure all gaps on the heatsink are filled in and you tin your CPU. Apply a line of compound down the middle of the CPU, after both sides are tinned and connect the two without lifting up.

If you aren't overclocking you should get 28C or lower with proper cooling and application. I overclocked to 4.5 and get 26-28C, and that's with a GPU.


I overclocked to like 3.7Ghz from 3.4Ghz but obviously with standard cooling it's a bad idea so immediately I took it back down, currently im running at stock frequency, and ok that made very little sense to me apologies.. what's 'tinned'? also what cooler are you using or do your recommend?
April 22, 2012 2:47:07 PM

harvs899 said:
I overclocked to like 3.7Ghz from 3.4Ghz but obviously with standard cooling it's a bad idea so immediately I took it back down, currently im running at stock frequency, and ok that made very little sense to me apologies..


Have you messed with any of the bios settings for your CPU? What's your CPU voltage set to?
April 22, 2012 2:49:17 PM

steph- said:
Have you messed with any of the bios settings for your CPU? What's your CPU voltage set to?


It's all back to standard I can safely say that 100%, and I think its 1.096V
April 22, 2012 2:55:16 PM

harvs899 said:
what's 'tinned'? also what cooler are you using or do your recommend?


It's mostly an electronics term/method when soldering (I'm an Electronics Chief), but I found out during my first build that it's a method suggested by Artic5, among other companies. Tinned is like prepping, allowing for a better connection and seal. Most heatsinks have grooves or valleys and aren't completely smooth, so you get some air between your CPU and heatsink. You don't want air or any space between the two. If you go to Artic5's website, you will find there directions on how they recommend applying the compound for different CPUs. There are many methods, but this one worked for me.

Another method for getting a good connection is filing the heatsink to get it really smooth, but after inspecting my after market heatsink, it seemed really smooth, just very grooved.

The CPU fan I choose is: XIGMATEK Gaia SD1283 120mm, which is probably one of the better ones for $30 and under (but a pain in the arse to assemble, at least at first, and fit fine with my RAM). If you want to spend more, I'm sure there is better out there. Some people like coolermaster or 212. Do some research a newegg and read reviews to find out which is best for you.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
April 22, 2012 3:04:02 PM

steph- said:
It's mostly an electronics term/method when soldering (I'm a Electronics Chief), but I found out during my first build that it's a method suggested by Artic5, among other companies. Tinned is like prepping, allowing for a better connection and seal. Most heatsinks have grooves or valleys and aren't completely smooth, so you get some air between your CPU and heatsink. You don't want air or any space between the two. If you go to Artic5's website, you will find there directions on how they recommend applying the compound for different CPUs. There are many methods, but this one worked for me.

Another method for getting a good connection is filing the heatsink to get it really smooth, but after inspecting my after market heatsink, it seemed really smooth, just very grooved.

The CPU fan I choose is: XIGMATEK Gaia SD1283 120mm, which is probably one of the better ones for $30 and under (but a pain in the arse to assemble, at least at first, and fit fine with my RAM). If you want to spend more, I'm sure there is better out there. Some people like coolermaster or 212. Do some research a newegg and read reviews to find out which is best for you.


OK, thank you. Back to the BSOD's do you have any idea what it could be?
April 22, 2012 3:08:53 PM

harvs899 said:
OK, thank you. Back to the BSOD's do you have any idea what it could be?


Your heatsink isn't fully seated possibly. Your temps are spiking after your computer is on for some time. If you want to check if temps are the issue, watch the temps and wait for the BSOD. What's the temp right before the BSOD? If it's only 50C-60C when you get it, I would probably rule out a temp issue. However, repeated temp spikes might be ruining your CPUs.
April 22, 2012 3:12:34 PM

steph- said:
Your heatsink isn't fully seated possibly. Your temps are spiking after your computer is on for some time. If you want to check if temps are the issue, watch the temps and wait for the BSOD. What's the temp right before the BSOD? If it's only 50C-60C when you get it, I would probably rule out a temp issue. However, repeated temp spikes might be ruining your CPUs.


Right before a bsod it always around the average temperature, nothing unusual, if it helps i forgot to mention it earlier, i feel i mostly blue screen when windows is loading or just after ive logged on, but ofc they arent the only times it happens
April 22, 2012 3:15:45 PM

If I were you, to avoid further damaging the CPU, I would shut down the system and do the following:

(1) Check all hardware are seated properly
(2) As advised by others with Steph inclusive, get a new cooler (Noctua's NH-D14 or Corsair H100) plus Arctic 5 compound.
(3) Follow Steph's advice or guidance given in the Arctic site in reapplying the thermal compound and fix this first

steps (4) and (5) to be followed only after completing the first three steps.

(4) would try bring the system to a stable condition without over-clocking and take it from there.
(5) update all drivers and software using http://www.filehippo.com/updatechecker/ or http://secunia.com/products/consumer/psi/

You have already spent a lot of money..I think it is important that you rule out cooler/thermal/proper technique problem before proceeding further. It is a frustrating experience but one step at a time is the best course of action.


best of luck
April 22, 2012 3:16:27 PM

harvs899 said:
Right before a bsod it always around the average temperature, nothing unusual, if it helps i forgot to mention it earlier, i feel i mostly blue screen when windows is loading or just after ive logged on, but ofc they arent the only times it happens


Okay not a temp issue specifically. CPU voltage issue or your bios settings are off. Are you getting BSOD when you run bios? Original factory bios settings might not be right for your CPU/and or RAM.

BSOD code 124 is a lack of VCORE or CPU VTT. 0x3B = increase vcore
1.096V is probably too low.

What's your RAM voltage set to?? It should be 1.5v. Timing: 9-9-9-24-2N
April 22, 2012 3:36:33 PM

SSri said:
If I were you, to avoid further damaging the CPU, I would shut down the system and do the following:

(1) Check all hardware are seated properly
(2) As advised by others with Steph inclusive, get a new cooler (Noctua's NH-D14 or Corsair H100) plus Arctic 5 compound.
(3) Follow Steph's advice or guidance given in the Arctic site in reapplying the thermal compound and fix this first

steps (4) and (5) to be followed only after completing the first three steps.

(4) would try bring the system to a stable condition without over-clocking and take it from there.
(5) update all drivers and software using http://www.filehippo.com/updatechecker/ or http://secunia.com/products/consumer/psi/

You have already spent a lot of money..I think it is important that you rule out cooler/thermal/proper technique problem before proceeding further. It is a frustrating experience but one step at a time is the best course of action.


best of luck


Everythings definately seated properly, at the moment I can't afford a new cooler but im definately going to purchase one. I've already updated drivers etc. countless times but i'll give it a go, and also im using Artic Silver 5 paste, and also i brought the overclock down a long time ago, even underclocking doesent help
April 22, 2012 3:37:28 PM

harvs899 said:
Everythings definately seated properly, at the moment I can't afford a new cooler but im definately going to purchase one. I've already updated drivers etc. countless times but i'll give it a go, and also im using Artic Silver 5 paste, and also i brought the overclock down a long time ago, even underclocking doesent help


Check bios settings again. Make sure they are correct for your specific CPU and RAM. I think your CPU Volt is way too low. RAM is at 1.5? and your timing is correct yes?

Is your Vcore set to manual still or auto? I'm guessing manual, since you quoted a specific voltage number. Bump the CPU volt to 1.2. Did you play with the CPU PLL?
April 22, 2012 3:42:07 PM

Does it always give you the error 124?
April 22, 2012 3:44:27 PM

steph- said:

Is your Vcore set to manual still or auto? I'm guessing manual, since you quoted a specific voltage number. Bump the CPU volt to 1.2. Did you play with the CPU PLL?


There should be a factory default, unless that is also over-written.
April 22, 2012 3:45:50 PM

SSri said:
There should be a factory default, unless that is also over-written.


Yes, but is it correct for his specific CPU and RAM? Mine wasn't. And if he was selected for factory, then his VCORE should be set to Auto, I do believe. His CPU Voltage is too low.
April 22, 2012 3:50:53 PM

steph- said:
Yes, but is it correct for his specific CPU and RAM? Mine wasn't. And if he was selected for factory, then his VCORE should be set to Auto, I do believe. His CPU Voltage is too low.


V core is auto
RAM is 1.65 V
and what voltage do you recommend for cpu?
April 22, 2012 3:51:39 PM

SSri said:
Does it always give you the error 124?


80% of the time yes, the second two most common are 3b and 7e, then 1e, then very rare ones like 50 and 1
April 22, 2012 3:52:21 PM

harvs899 said:
V core is auto
RAM is 1.65 V
and what voltage do you recommend for cpu?


Ram should be set to 1.5 and check timing for accuracy. Cas Latency: 9 Timing: 9-9-9-24-2N Volt 1.5. Speed: 1600
You can leave CPU Volt on auto for now, that is until you test the RAM. First change the RAM to the correct setting. Then test.

If you still get BSOD, take your CPU volt out of Auto and set it according the recommended parameters for your CPU.
April 22, 2012 3:54:10 PM

steph- said:
Ram should be set to 1.5 and checking timing for accuracy.
You can leave it auto, but that's not working for you it seems. First change the RAM to the correct setting. Then test.

OK, will do
April 22, 2012 3:55:14 PM

harvs899 said:
OK, will do


Cas Latency: 9, Timing: 9-9-9-24-2N, DRAM Voltage: 1.5v, Speed: 1600 (make sure it's not defaulting to another number)

VCCIO should be set to auto or 1.00v

Still BSOD, take CPU volt out of Auto and change to 1.2.

It's probably not the RAM setting, since you aren't getting memory code errors, but it doesn't hurt to fix this and check. This would also directly effect your CPU.
April 22, 2012 4:12:37 PM

steph- said:
Cas Latency: 9, Timing: 9-9-9-24-2N, DRAM Voltage: 1.5v, Speed: 1600 (make sure it's not defaulting to another number)

VCCIO should be set to auto or 1.00v

Still BSOD, take CPU volt out of Auto and change to 1.2.

It's probably not the RAM setting, since you aren't getting memory code errors, but it doesn't hurt to fix this and check. This would also directly effect your CPU.


Thanks alot! Will try all and come back if i bsod or dont!
April 22, 2012 4:16:15 PM

harvs899 said:
Thanks alot! Will try all and come back if i bsod or dont!


I have the same brand of RAM/model, but at 1866, and I checked your RAM (1600) recommended settings for those suggestions.

I have an Asus mob as well (ASUS P8Z68-V PRO/GEN3). I'll go check my bios layout and see how it's specifically labeled and get back to you.
April 22, 2012 4:44:16 PM

BCKLK/PCIE Freq: 100 (just ensure it's set to this and not over)
Memory Frequency: DDR3 1600 MHz
VRM Freq: Auto
CPU Current Capability: 100%

Dram Timing Control:
DRAM CAS# Latency: 9
DRAM RAS# to CAS# Delay: 9
DRAM RAS# Pretime: 9
DRAM RAS# ACT Time: 24
DRAM RAS# Command mod: 2
Leave all settings under Secondary timing to Auto.

CPU voltage: Manual (Or you can leave it on Auto, but it seems to have defaulted lower than your CPU's recommended setting)
CPU Manual voltage: 1.2 ( I have mine set to 1.3, and that's for a i5 2500K)
DRAM Voltage: 1.5
VCCIO Voltage: 1.0 (I have mine set to 1.1)
CPU PLL Voltage: 1.9
PCH Voltage: Auto
DRAM Data Ref voltage on CHA: Auto
DRAM CTRL Ref Volt on CHA: Auto
CPU Spread Spectrum: Disabled (you can leave this alone if you choose)

CPU Q-Fan Control: Disabled (this will run your fan at max speed all the time)


If say you had the DRAM volt set to 1.65v and/or the freq set to 1333, it might cause a issue. RAM defaults for mobo vary, check to see what yours defaulted to.


Btw, I wouldn't run a computer off an extension cord. In fact, I would suggest buying a UPS as well. I had to pony up, after I had a couple of power issues at my new place. This will also be very good for supporting a HDD w/ a OS (I know you're not though). It's worth the investment, especially if your build is over a certain $$ amount.
April 22, 2012 4:54:05 PM

if it comes back, please try and follow this link>

All these would usually show a file name that caused the BSOD....googling that would help.

For 124:

http://www.sevenforums.com/crash-lockup-debug-how/35349...

3B is usually memory corruption and system file issues...some times ntkrnltmp.exe (Usual causes: System service, Device driver, graphics driver, ?memory.)
Memory test

memory. download memtestx86, burn it to cd, and run it for at least 7 passes

System

system files--run a system file check to verify and repair system files.
(type cmd in search>right click and run as admin>sfc /scannow)


For 7E:

GPU?

SYSTEM_THREAD_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED
A system thread generated an exception which the error handler did not catch. There are numerous individual causes for this problem, including hardware incompatibility, a faulty device driver or system service, or some software issues.

BTW, I assume all your hardware are compatible with your motherboard....
April 22, 2012 5:27:10 PM

steph- said:
BCKLK/PCIE Freq: 100 (just ensure it's set to this and not over)
Memory Frequency: DDR3 1600 MHz
VRM Freq: Auto
CPU Current Capability: 100%

Dram Timing Control:
DRAM CAS# Latency: 9
DRAM RAS# to CAS# Delay: 9
DRAM RAS# Pretime: 9
DRAM RAS# ACT Time: 24
DRAM RAS# Command mod: 2
Leave all settings under Secondary timing to Auto.

CPU voltage: Manual (Or you can leave it on Auto, but it seems to have defaulted lower than your CPU's recommended setting)
CPU Manual voltage: 1.2 ( I have mine set to 1.3, and that's for a i5 2500K)
DRAM Voltage: 1.5
VCCIO Voltage: 1.0 (I have mine set to 1.1)
CPU PLL Voltage: 1.9
PCH Voltage: Auto
DRAM Data Ref voltage on CHA: Auto
DRAM CTRL Ref Volt on CHA: Auto
CPU Spread Spectrum: Disabled (you can leave this alone if you choose)

CPU Q-Fan Control: Disabled (this will run your fan at max speed all the time)


Btw, I wouldn't run a computer off an extension cord. In fact, I would suggest buying a UPS as well. I had to pony up, after I had a couple of power issues at my new place. This will also be very good for supporting a HDD w/ a OS (I know you're not though). It's worth the investment, especially if your build is over a certain $$ amount.


I did everything else but I couldnt find these;

CPU PLL Voltage: 1.9
DRAM Data Ref voltage on CHA: Auto
DRAM CTRL Ref Volt on CHA: Auto


And SSri the 124s never tell me the faulty module on screen, but when its 3b it's usually Npfs.sys and 7e atikmdag.sys and apparently the 124's are hal.dll
April 22, 2012 5:29:05 PM

harvs899 said:
I did everything else but I couldnt find these;

CPU PLL Voltage: 1.9
DRAM Data Ref voltage on CHA: Auto
DRAM CTRL Ref Volt on CHA: Auto


And SSri the 124s never tell me the faulty module on screen, but when its 3b it's usually Npfs.sys and 7e atikmdag.sys and apparently the 124's are hal.dll


Sorry, I first put 28 down for DRAM RAS# ACT Time. That's my setting, and yours should be 24. No worries on the rest. You shouldn't have to mess with the rest b/c it should be good if it was defaulted.

Did you change your CPU Volt to manual?
April 22, 2012 5:30:30 PM

steph- said:
Sorry, I put 28 for one of the DRAM timings before. That's my setting, and yours should be 24. No worries on the rest.


I didn't change that, i had a feeling it was meant to be 24, but thanks for the rest! but surprise surprise, i just crashed once again
April 22, 2012 5:32:32 PM

harvs899 said:
I didn't change that, i had a feeling it was meant to be 24, but thanks for the rest! but surprise surprise, i just crashed once again


Did you switch the CPU Volt out of Auto? I'm pretty sure all your hardware is compatible. I have most of the same or very similar.
You're set for 1600 and you made sure to save your settings before rebooting out of Bios?
!