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HELP! My graphics card keeps getting destroyed!

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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February 14, 2012 4:32:46 AM

I purchased an EVGA 2gb GTX 560ti when I did my build. Within two weeks, the card blew and I was getting screen-tearing and artifacts on the boot. I RMA'ed the card with EVGA and got a new card in today. I started the PC up and everything booted great. I left for the gym, and when I came back and turned on the PC, the SAME thing happened as last time.

I cannot view anything on my 1080p monitor, but instead goes to my lower-res monitor that is hooked up. I can't even access the BIOS without screen tearing. PC Wizard doesn't pick up that any graphics card is installed.

At first I thought it was just bad GPU hardware, but now I'm thinking it's something else since this happened twice.

Here is my build:

Intel i7 2600k 3.4ghz
MSI P67A-GD65
EVGA GtX 560ti 2gb
Sandisk 120gb SSD
Geil 4gbx4 DDR3 1600
Seasonic 620w Bronze RT
ASUS DRW-24x
Acer LCD 23" 1080p

PLEASE help me fix the issue. I am leaning towards it being a bad PSU, but I just have no clue. Everything was working fine for a while, but since the first card blew there has been nothing but issues.

I tried swapping the PCI-e slot and I get the same thing. Checked all cables. Even before tonight's issue I downclocked my RAM and GPU as the recommendation from the EVGA CS rep. (RAM to 1333 and GPU core-clock down to 805)

This is my first build and I can't help but thing it was something I did but I just don't see it. I'm afraid that EVGA will not be willing to work with me since I already blew the first card and now the second. I have no idea what's wrong. I could use some expert advice. It would be greatly appreciated.
a b U Graphics card
February 14, 2012 4:40:24 AM

I dont trust those seasonic PSU's at all.

does sound like a power issue causing probs with the VID card.

have you tried a diff video card in your PC for a while?
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February 14, 2012 4:44:30 AM

I don't have any other cards to try. This is my only desktop PC and I don't have access to anything else other than my wife's netbook and an old laptop. - It has made pin-pointing the problem extremely difficult.

If it is the PSU, do you think that the card is definitely destroyed, or is it just not being enabled? - My biggest fear is that EVGA will say "tough luck" and I'll have to fork out another few hundred for a card in addition to another $100+ for a new PSU. I don't see how there's any way to get my money back for this PSU at this point.
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Related resources
February 14, 2012 5:21:30 AM

Here are a few examples:









...when I mouse-over (I can only get to Windows in safe-mode if it boots at all), the screen will reveal bits and pieces where the cursor is, but then it disappears.
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a b U Graphics card
February 14, 2012 6:45:55 AM

Since Seasonic is the gold standard of PSU quality, I would suspect it last.

My first suspect would be the PCIe slot in the MSI motherboard, followed by the low quality electrical components they use. If the MSI board is supplying improper voltages, all sorts of fun things can happen. Other than swapping mobos, I can see no other solution unless you are up on your component level testing.

For my money, I only trust ASUS and Gigabyte motherboards.
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February 14, 2012 8:37:22 AM

In other words, try to put the graphics card in a friends computer. If it works there you know it's some other part in your system, mainboard or PSU. If you have no one available, try to go to a PC shop nearby and ask them for help. Might cost you a few bucks. But at least you will know.

Changing a graphics card is a minor system impact, aka it won't hurt his system to change it. Especially so if he also runs a NVIDIA card (due to no driver change needed)... Just in case he's worried about putting it in his PC.


You do have enough airflow in your system, right? Screen tearing can also be caused through excessive heat.
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February 14, 2012 9:09:58 AM

Check both 6 pins if they are connected properly. Check the PCI-E slot for dust and good connection( a friend was complaining about his video card for artifacts and etc i just pushed it in the slot and voila). Try bios reset to default and fresh windows install with latest nvidia/intel (don't go for beta ones) drivers for their websites. I have seen something similar due to a bad driver only fresh win install helped.
ps i have a lot of friends with bad EVGA experience.
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February 14, 2012 12:15:48 PM

tlmck said:
Since Seasonic is the gold standard of PSU quality, I would suspect it last.

My first suspect would be the PCIe slot in the MSI motherboard, followed by the low quality electrical components they use. If the MSI board is supplying improper voltages, all sorts of fun things can happen. Other than swapping mobos, I can see no other solution unless you are up on your component level testing.

For my money, I only trust ASUS and Gigabyte motherboards.


I've swapped the slots and I still get the same error. I guess the board itself is always a possibility, but if that was the case, I'd have a hard time believing it would effect both slots equally. I guess I could be wrong.

shashmahal said:
Check both 6 pins if they are connected properly. Check the PCI-E slot for dust and good connection( a friend was complaining about his video card for artifacts and etc i just pushed it in the slot and voila). Try bios reset to default and fresh windows install with latest nvidia/intel (don't go for beta ones) drivers for their websites. I have seen something similar due to a bad driver only fresh win install helped.
ps i have a lot of friends with bad EVGA experience.


I've checked all of this, including multiple drivers. - You also have to understand I can barely even see my screen when I turn on the PC.

I've tried Nvidia 500 Series drivers 265 thru 295. It's definitely not the drivers.
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February 14, 2012 12:22:56 PM

whatsthatnoise said:
In other words, try to put the graphics card in a friends computer. If it works there you know it's some other part in your system, mainboard or PSU. If you have no one available, try to go to a PC shop nearby and ask them for help. Might cost you a few bucks. But at least you will know.

Changing a graphics card is a minor system impact, aka it won't hurt his system to change it. Especially so if he also runs a NVIDIA card (due to no driver change needed)... Just in case he's worried about putting it in his PC.


You do have enough airflow in your system, right? Screen tearing can also be caused through excessive heat.


Going to a shop would be my only option out of those. I can call a couple places to see what they would charge me.

Yes, plenty of airflow. I really haven't even used the card intensively yet. I did some editing on Premiere Pro maybe once or twice.- I've got 4 case fans in addition to my GPU fan and heatsink fan, and a managed cable system. Everything looks nice and is running at good temps.
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February 14, 2012 12:43:09 PM

clean the pcie slot on the mobo with an old toothbrush and some alcohol
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a b U Graphics card
February 18, 2012 1:53:22 PM

@ OP. Any luck with the card ?
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