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Which CPU is right? Help

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August 6, 2012 2:01:28 AM

Hello ,

I'm building a new PC and was debating on what type of CPU I should get.

I plan on gaming, do some overclocking (on air and nothing extreme). I plan to be using this after market heatsink for now:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

(I will for sure try water cooling in the future, probably not any time soon though)

And I also plan on doing some video editing in the future.

I was dead set on getting the i7 3770k (ivy bridge ), but I've heard overclocking and heat might be a problem and I've thought about getting a i7 2700k (sandy bridge) because of lower temperatures, but I'm not sure if it offers all that the 3770k has to offer when it comes to video editing. ( Ive also heard the 2700k wouldn't use my 3.0 PCIE Z77 Motherboard chipset to it's capacity. (I plan on getting a z77 sabertooth)

Now here I am asking for help. It'd be greatly appreciated if my question was answered thoroughly if not I still thank you for the reply. Any answers are welcome. If there's another CPU that you think would better fit my needs please do tell :) 

BTW Here's all the other parts to this new PC I plan on creating:

CPU: Undecided 1155 socket preferably
Heatsink :http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

GPU: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 Superclocked
4GB VRAM 256 bit PCIE Express 3.0
MOBO: ASUS Z77 Sabertooth
RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 16GB (4 x 4GB)
240-Pin DDR3 1600
dual channel memory
HDD: 1 TB 7200 RPM Samsung F3
HDD Cache (Using SRT): Samsung 830 Series
64GB SSD
SSD Boot Drive: Kingston HyperX 3K 120 GB
PSU: Thermaltake Toughpower Grand 850W


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a c 186 à CPUs
August 6, 2012 2:14:55 AM

i7-2600K, there is no difference in gaming between PCIE 3.0 and 2.0
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August 6, 2012 2:22:44 AM

I know it wasn't your question, but I wouldn't bother with the 4GB version of the 670. The 670/680 is more limited by its VRAM bus width (256-bit) than by the quantity of VRAM. I suppose it's not an insane investment if you're doing a lot of very VRAM-intensive activities or gaming at a very high resolution (above 1080p), but I wouldn't do it myself.

As to the CPU--if your plan is to do overclocking on air and nothing extreme (your words!), then you should definitely get the 3770k. The only time that ivy bridge produces excessive heat is with very high overclocks--say, 4.4GHz and up--and especially with overvolting. Unless you're aiming to set world records, get IB and take advantage of the lower power usage and mildly better IPC. (PCIe 3.0 won't matter, but the power savings are real.) It's not like you'd go wrong with a 2600k or 2700k, but I would do 3770k in your position.
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August 6, 2012 2:45:01 AM

motorneuron said:
I know it wasn't your question, but I wouldn't bother with the 4GB version of the 670. The 670/680 is more limited by its VRAM bus width (256-bit) than by the quantity of VRAM. I suppose it's not an insane investment if you're doing a lot of very VRAM-intensive activities or gaming at a very high resolution (above 1080p), but I wouldn't do it myself.

As to the CPU--if your plan is to do overclocking on air and nothing extreme (your words!), then you should definitely get the 3770k. The only time that ivy bridge produces excessive heat is with very high overclocks--say, 4.4GHz and up--and especially with overvolting. Unless you're aiming to set world records, get IB and take advantage of the lower power usage and mildly better IPC. (PCIe 3.0 won't matter, but the power savings are real.) It's not like you'd go wrong with a 2600k or 2700k, but I would do 3770k in your position.


I've heard some games like battlefield 3 and skyrim Utilize the extra VRAM, while i was reading reviews here:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I greatly appreciate the response and your opinion :)  , buuuut I'll be sticking with the original GPU, but as for the CPU you do bring up some good points.... do you know if the 3770k has any note worthy or considerable advantages over the 2700k when it comes to Video editing?
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a c 116 à CPUs
August 6, 2012 3:14:36 AM

yeah a lot of guys on there think they know what they are talking about.
you need actual ram for the extra textures on skyrim not extra video ram. the extra vram will help with things like draw distance but on a 1080p screen the most you wll need is 1.5-2gigs. only when you start with multi monitor setups will you need more and thats only and extra 512mb per screen as your just pushing pixels not more pollys. most of the time a typical game will use less than half the vram on them cards.
a 2 gig 670 is more than enough for any current game when the drivers are working properly you will be able to max out bf3 to 55fps minimum (only a couple of areas on a few maps in the game will cause this drop) most of the time you will be well over 60fps the 680 has exactly the same fps drop in the same parts of the map so spending the extra on that card wouldn't help..
as for the skyrim mods. i ran a lot of them with little in the way of performance drop off on a 1gig 5870 maybe 2-4 fps. most of the problems with that came are down to a poorly coded game engine not the texture packs.
so yeah if your running a 1920/1080 single screen then 2 gigs is more than enough.

as for the cpu theres very little separating them. you get about 4% performance increase across the board at stock and slightly lower power consumption. but 1s you start overclocking then the older sandy will show a slight advantage in that it can oc further will use no more power and run cooler. so if your gonna run on a light oc then get the ivy if your gonna go more extreme get the sandy.
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August 13, 2012 1:33:53 AM

Best answer selected by Rdizzle96.
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