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Need advice on an Ivy Bridge video editing powerhouse

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April 23, 2012 10:38:21 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: as soon as I can get an Ivy Bridge processor

Budget Range: (e.g.: 600-800) I'd love to do this for less than $2000

System Usage from Most to Least Important: After Effects and HD / 4K video editing least important being Minesweeper. I don't really game on my computer all that often either.

Parts Not Required: (e.g.: keyboard, mouse, monitor, speakers, OS): Keyboard, mouse, monitor (dual Dell 30 inch WFPs at 2500x1600), DVD Burner, Blu-Ray burner

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: newegg / amazon (if someone knows of a better/cheaper option that all the nerds are using these days by all means).
Country: (e.g.: India) Chicago, IL USA

Parts Preferences: by brand or type: Not really. Nvidia for the graphics card (I think) because the Optix adds punch in Adobe programs.

Overclocking: Yes / No / Maybe - Probably not.

SLI or Crossfire: Yes / No / Maybe - I have no idea what that means so, no.

Monitor Resolution: Dual 2500x1600. Right now they are DVI, but could use DisplayPort as well. I would love to be able to add a 3rd HDMI monitor and (if not ridiculous) run a 4th monitor as well via DVI. Ideally, 2 Display port, one HDMI, and a way to use DVI would be incredible. However, that last DVI is somewhat optional.

Additional Comments: I waited for Ivy Bridge for the USB 3.0 native. I'd love to put 64gb of RAM in this thing and have a graphics card that's Nvidia to get some extra punch out of After Effects. On board sound is fine. As many USB, SATA ports as physically possible.

Best solution

April 24, 2012 12:26:54 AM

Firstly an i7 seems like the obvious choice. I'd also cram as much RAM as you can in there. For a socket 1155 build, 32GB is going to be your max though.

I think the best way to run all those monitors would be dual cards. It is possible to do it with a single card but it can get quite complicated (and involves using AMD instead of Nvidia). Also I think you will need the kind of horsepower you get with two cards to game at that resolution.

Something along the lines of this should be very good:

i7-3770k - ~$320
2 x G.SKILL Ares Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 1600Mhz - $229.98 ($114.99 each)
ASRock Z77 Extreme4 LGA 1155 Intel Z77 - $134.99
2 x MSI Twin Frozr II GTX 560 Ti (Fermi) 2GB - $539.98 ($269.99 each)
Intel 520 Series 160GB - $274.99
SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ 1TB 7200 RPM - $109.99
Seasonic X-750 750W - $159.99
Antec P280 - $119.99
Coolermaster Hyper 212 Evo - $34.99
Samsung DVD Burner - $16.99

Total - ~$1950 on Newegg


EDIT: Just to add, most of the parts picked there were picked because of stability. There are cheaper PSU's out there but that one is rock solid. There are also plenty of cheaper SSD's but Intel are fantastic for reliability in SSD's. There are also some newer graphics cards coming out soon but since you're not that bothered about gaming I'd get something tried and tested and known to be nice and reliable like those 560Ti's. (The 2GB version is recommended because ultra high resolutions eat up a lot of VRAM.)
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April 24, 2012 12:30:00 AM

Is there no way to get to 64gb of RAM with this first round of Ivy Bridge processors?

Is there a motherboard situation where I could throw the 6 core 64gb allowing Sandy Bridge processor in there and then later throw an Ivy Bridge allowing for 64gb of RAM in?
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April 24, 2012 12:36:01 AM

The 6 core CPU's are a different socket (socket 2011) so you can't upgrade from that to Ivy Bridge.

The most slots I have seen on a 1155 board is 4 and 16GB DIMM's aren't around yet so 4 x 8GB looks to be your maximum unless you go with socket 2011.
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April 24, 2012 12:37:12 AM

Is there a motherboard that supports 64gb of RAM either with Ivy Bridge or with Sandy Bridge that one could use until Intel puts out a 3rd gen processor that supports 64gb of RAM?
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April 24, 2012 12:37:20 AM

This is a situation where you really should spend up for an i7-3930K and accompanying X79 chipset. The performance increase in video editing of moving from a quad to a hexacore is substantial enough that under those circumstances even an old Gulftown is still vastly preferable to a Sandy or Ivy Bridge quad.
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April 24, 2012 12:43:09 AM

If you drop one of those graphics cards out of that build and get it when you want to add your third monitor, you could free up some funds to go for the 2011 socket. If you want 6 cores, you will probably go slightly over budget though.

EDIT: Be sure to change the RAM to quad channel stuff if you go for the 2011 CPU too.
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Anonymous
April 24, 2012 12:43:14 AM

dthesleepless said:
This is a situation where you really should spend up for an i7-3930K and accompanying X79 chipset. The performance increase in video editing of moving from a quad to a hexacore is substantial enough that under those circumstances even an old Gulftown is still vastly preferable to a Sandy or Ivy Bridge quad.

i would agree with you until this morning when i read the ivy bridge reviews. as much as sandy was phenomenal for gaming, ivy is giving sandy-e a real run for the money.
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April 24, 2012 3:11:23 AM

Anonymous said:
i would agree with you until this morning when i read the ivy bridge reviews. as much as sandy was phenomenal for gaming, ivy is giving sandy-e a real run for the money.


Yeah, damn, with results like that in Maya there's not much reason to go with Sandy E.

I'd been waiting since last summer to build a new computer, but was really aiming for that 64gb of RAM. That felt somewhat future proof to me. It looks like it might make sense to wait for Q4 and the Ive-E's for that. Hmm.

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April 26, 2012 3:23:02 AM

So I read that 1155 boards that were for Sandy Bridge are able to handle an Ivy Processor with a BIOS update and a few other driver updates.

Is it reasonable to assume that an x79 board will be the same way and that one purchased now could...next year when Ivy-E comes out...presumably be upgraded the same way?
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April 26, 2012 11:15:18 AM

That may be the case but I wouldn't count on it, Intel are known for changing sockets more than they strictly need to.
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May 3, 2012 7:39:21 AM

Best answer selected by bengarbe.
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