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First gaming build

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April 24, 2012 7:12:34 PM

Dear Tom'sHardware collective knowledge base.

I decided recently that a laptop just wont cut it for playing games anymore. My original budget had been about $1500, but I quickly realized that was completely unrealistic for what I wanted from my computer. I priced out some things, and this is what I came up with; (preferably ordering everything from tigerdirect.ca)

Display- Samsung 24" LED HD display- $180
RAM- Corsair vengeance gold 1600mhz 4x 4Gb ram- $120
Hard drive- Intel 520 120Gb SSD- $190 (For OS and most applications)
WD Caviar Blue 500Gb hd- $85 (500Gb will be more than plenty for the time being. By the time I run out of space on it, a 240Gb SSD will be affordable)
Cooler- Coolermaster Hyper N520 fan- $40
Case- Corsair Obsidian 650D- $175 (Fell in love with this case)
GPU- Asus or EVGA GTX 680- $520ish
CPU- Intel i7 3770k
Total: $1310

This is where I ran into trouble. I don't really know what to do. I know want to run an Ivy bridge processor, but thats about it. What would you guys suggest for a Mobo? My only requirement for a mobo is USB 3.0 (which is pretty standard), but would also like PCIE 3.0 as well. A PSU? and what about windows? Do I want to get the OEM version, or is it worth it to get the full version?

All input into this build is appreciated. Pretty much everything I know about putting together a PC is summed up by the NewEgg two part pc build on youtube. Hopefully you can provide me with some good suggestions, and let me know if this stuff will even fit together properly.

Thanks in advance to anyone who replies.

More about : gaming build

April 24, 2012 8:49:34 PM

JohnGalt1 said:
Dear Tom'sHardware collective knowledge base.

I decided recently that a laptop just wont cut it for playing games anymore. My original budget had been about $1500, but I quickly realized that was completely unrealistic for what I wanted from my computer. I priced out some things, and this is what I came up with; (preferably ordering everything from tigerdirect.ca)

Display- Samsung 24" LED HD display- $180
RAM- Corsair vengeance gold 1600mhz 4x 4Gb ram- $120
Hard drive- Intel 520 120Gb SSD- $190 (For OS and most applications)
WD Caviar Blue 500Gb hd- $85 (500Gb will be more than plenty for the time being. By the time I run out of space on it, a 240Gb SSD will be affordable)
Cooler- Coolermaster Hyper N520 fan- $40
Case- Corsair Obsidian 650D- $175 (Fell in love with this case)
GPU- Asus or EVGA GTX 680- $520ish
CPU- Intel i7 3770k
Total: $1310

This is where I ran into trouble. I don't really know what to do. I know want to run an Ivy bridge processor, but thats about it. What would you guys suggest for a Mobo? My only requirement for a mobo is USB 3.0 (which is pretty standard), but would also like PCIE 3.0 as well. A PSU? and what about windows? Do I want to get the OEM version, or is it worth it to get the full version?

All input into this build is appreciated. Pretty much everything I know about putting together a PC is summed up by the NewEgg two part pc build on youtube. Hopefully you can provide me with some good suggestions, and let me know if this stuff will even fit together properly.

Thanks in advance to anyone who replies.


Looks like a really solid build so far with a fair bit of overkill (but who cares). Since you are wanting PCI 3.0 then your definately going to want to go with a z77 chipset. What level of board you go with will be determined by your future plans to add extra 680's. If your planning on adding another one in the future but no more than that (my plan) and aren't intersted in a supuer aggressive OC then id go with something like the asus p8z77-V. I am a fan of Asus boards because they have been reliable for me and seem to come fully featured but I know there are other good brands out there.

As for a PSU your build is too expensive to try and skimp on this critical part so as pretty much everyone else will tell u on the forums stick to trusted name brands like Corsair. I chose the corsair HX-850 because it is reliable, quiet, efficient, modular and provides more than enough power for 2 GPU's with remaining headroom for OC'ing. No advice on the software tho. All in all good work on ur build its gonna be a beast.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... mobo

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... psu
April 24, 2012 8:55:35 PM

Your spending too much on ram get 4gbx2 16gb is useless for gaming.
Pick any z77 mobo because they all support usb 3.0 and pci 3.0 I prefer Asrock or Asus
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April 24, 2012 9:20:31 PM

I am doing a very similar build with the GtX 680 and i7 3770k... the Motherboard I picked up was an Asus P8Z77-V Pro. There's also a deluxe and a Sabertooth. Sabertooth is a bit more "rugged" and the Deluxe has a couple more ports.
April 24, 2012 9:24:23 PM

I agree with both posters above. Get a z77 board, preferably Asus. Asrock or Gigabyte are other good options.

Don't bother getting 16GB of memory. 8GB is enough and you can always upgrade in the future. Perhaps the higher speed memory will come down in price and offer better latencies. When that happens your mobo should be able to support it and it will be a worthwhile upgrade. Right now the memory your getting probably the best you can choose (within a reasonable budget), some of the higher speed memories are similarly priced but their latencies are higher to the extent that the difference in performance is negligible (without tweaking, overclocking etc). Right now, you won't get much value out of anything more than 8GB unless your doing heavy video editing or something.

Corsair PSU's are my favorite. If you plan on SLIing in the future grab an 850W like "Black Thought" suggests above. If you absolutely never plan on SLIing a 650W should be fine.

Summary of Corsair PSU series:

TX - 80+ bronze, non-modular
HX - 80+silver, modular
AX - 80+gold, modular

HX is the idea middle ground offering slightly better efficiency but more importantly is modular as compared to the TX series. The AX series is awesome but probably not worth it unless its extremely close in price to the HX series or you have extra cash to burn. In any case, if you can deal with the non-modularity the TX series is good too.
April 25, 2012 5:28:04 PM

Thanks guys.

The power supply you suggested is the same one that I was scoping out for the last little while. I had figured that I'd be better off getting an 850w, since I do plan to add another GTX 680 in the future, when the price comes down a bunch. Even then, I'll have some head room for a wee bit of overclocking, like Black Thought said, to 4.0 GHz or whatever people find out is stable.
I like the Mobo that Black Thought posted. Is there going to be any difference between this one,
http://www.tigerdirect.ca/applications/SearchTools/item...

or this one,

http://www.tigerdirect.ca/applications/SearchTools/item...

and one of those fancy ROG, or Maximus extreme super overpriced boards?

Since I've never put together a computer before, my biggest worry has been whether or not the parts will fit together properly. Is there sort of a standard that the companies adhere to? Will bolt pattern in the Corsair 650D fit with most mobo's and PSU's?


Again, thanks a lot for the help.
April 25, 2012 6:33:16 PM

Quote:
Thanks guys.

The power supply you suggested is the same one that I was scoping out for the last little while. I had figured that I'd be better off getting an 850w, since I do plan to add another GTX 680 in the future, when the price comes down a bunch. Even then, I'll have some head room for a wee bit of overclocking, like Black Thought said, to 4.0 GHz or whatever people find out is stable.
I like the Mobo that Black Thought posted. Is there going to be any difference between this one,
http://www.tigerdirect.ca/applications/SearchTools/item...

or this one,

http://www.tigerdirect.ca/applications/SearchTools/item...

and one of those fancy ROG, or Maximus extreme super overpriced boards?

Since I've never put together a computer before, my biggest worry has been whether or not the parts will fit together properly. Is there sort of a standard that the companies adhere to? Will bolt pattern in the Corsair 650D fit with most mobo's and PSU's?


Again, thanks a lot for the help.


First off, Yes there is a standard and its called ATX. There is also the less common micro ATX and extended ATX. The 650D is a mid tower case which is a little smaller than a full tower case but still will easily accept a standard ATX mobo (All the ones you've linked). There will be labels in your case showing you where to screw down your ATX mobo. This information is widely available on youtube or something. Same with power supplies, as far as I know they are all the same size and the hx 850 will definately fit in your case

The ROG boards are overpriced because they usually add features that are for the most extreme "gamers". I think the new ones have a dedicated pcb for sound so its better isolated (don't think this makes a noticeable difference) and is supposed to remove any interference from other portions of the board. The main differences though relate to dedicated power for more extreme overclocking of the CPU and RAM and any extended versions of these mobo's allow for additional video cards to be put in Xfire/SLI.

Sabertooth boards are made from higher quality parts and have thermal shielding with internal fans for areas that are especially hot and humid. Unless this sounds like your situation then its a useless addition also. The V and the V pro share pretty the exact same feature set except for I believe that that Pro has 4 more dedicated power channels for better overclocking. The main thing here to realize is that unless you are interested in aggressive OC's the pro probably doesn't add anything for you.

Hope that helps.
April 25, 2012 7:26:12 PM

This topic has been moved from the section CPU & Components to section Systems by Mousemonkey
April 26, 2012 11:20:33 PM

Holy, yea. All of this has been incredibly helpful. When I get around to actually sticking the thing together, do you have any tips for things that are frequently done wrong? I'm a machinist by trade, so I'm pretty handy, but still don't know much about computers. Any hints along those lines??
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