I7 3820, i7 2600K, i5 2550K or i5 2500K?

Hey guys,

I'm so confused right now, it's not even funny! haha!

Please help me out, what do I take? The options are in the heading.

I use my computer mostly for Gaming and Graphic Processing including 3DMax, Revit and A LOT of video editing. (But still, mostly for gaming).

The rest of the system specs confirmed till now are -
Sapphire Radeon HD 6950 2GB
8GB Corsair Single Chip RAM (Can change)
2TB HDD (1x1 = Barracuda XT and Caviar Black)

What should I go with? (I'd love to stick an i7 sticker on my rig :D but I'll still do what you say)

Another problem is, if I go for the 3820, the only mobo I'm getting is Intel DX79TO (http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/motherboards/desktop-motherboards/desktop-board-dx79to.html)

Thanks..
18 answers Last reply
More about 3820 2600k 2550k 2500k
  1. The natural response is that you will need a i7 and hyperthreading thingymabob b ecause you do graphics processing. This is not true a low cost i5 2500/k or i5 3550/k with a Z77 board will be more than sufficient, don't give into this HT nonsense.

    As to K or non K, that depends on your desire to overclock, but like I always say Overclocking is a hobby at best, you don't get something for nothing, if you don't really want to overclock don't get a unlocked chip.
  2. ^+1 an i5 3570k woud be your best bet at lowest price if you're overclocking. get a great but cheap mobo like the asrock z77 extreme 4 or something like that but if you still want an i7 it's not a bad choice either.
  3. When it comes to overclocking I don't endorse cheap motherboards for that, If you are serious about your overclocking then nothing short of a higher end board is prefered, this is down to build quality, it takes a slight defect or insufficient power control to lose you a fortune in non-rma products due to CID.

    Not saying high end doesn't fail but you can literally feel, smell and see the difference between mainstream and high end/enthusiast. I would give serious looks at the Gigabyte Z77 UD5H, for its price, a lot of more expensive boards cannot touch it feature and oc wise. If you really want to throw cash into a board, the Gigabyte Z77 assassin board, best Z77 board out, but expensive and not really needed.
  4. Won't getting a 3820 be a better price? It has PCIe 3.0 support and 64 max supported ram? :\
  5. A gigabyte z77x-d3h with a i5 3570k will do wonders... OC at 4.0 GHz no problem at all, u might push it to 4.4 I believe with no big issue.
  6. arzbhatia said:
    Won't getting a 3820 be a better price? It has PCIe 3.0 support and 64 max supported ram? :\

    the 3570k supports PCIe 3.0 and were ou really planning on using 64gb of ram? :o ... :lol:
  7. 2260121 said:
    the 3570k supports PCIe 3.0 and were ou reallyplanning on using 64gb of ram? :o ... :lol:


    Haha yes! You don't know me xD I buy RAM when I'm bored hahaha!
  8. There is absolutely no reason to buy a 3820, it is slower than a 2600 and 2700 let alone the Ivy Bridge offerings and it costs stupid money for a half baked chip.

    64GB RAM does nothing for your, you will barely saturate 4GB, thats a waste of cash to be honest.
  9. How comes it's benchmarks are just after the 3960x or whatever?
  10. What version of Revit and 3D max....2010 and older did not support Hyperthreading so there was no advantage to a i7 CPU....That changed with 3Dmax 2011 and Revit 2011

    Here you see the i7 3830 substantially outperforming the i5 2500k in 3DMax

    http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/HD_7970_GHz_Edition/33.html

    Here you see the i7 2600k substantially outperforming the i5 2500k in 3DMax

    http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/288?vs=287

    In PoV-Ray, the advantage is close to 50% for the 3820

    So yes, it's undeniable that HT is a huge boon in AutoDesk products. That issue having been soundly put to bed, let's move on to the CPU choice....

    The 2600k is a useless CPU, as the 2700k is just a few bucks more

    -If Revit and 3DMax are the controlling factors, I'd get the 3820 as it does pay significant dividends in current AutoDesk products, and .....if ya look at the link above does better than the 2500k in gaming (7 wins for the 3820, 3 for the 2500k)....is it worth the additional cost ?...only you can decide.

    -If gaming is the controlling factor, then it's between the 2500k and 3570k. If you plan on doing big OC's (4.8 - 5.0 Ghz) , I'd get the 2500k, at moderate OC's (up to 4.5 Ghz) I'd get the 3570k.
  11. Wow thanks Jack!

    Okay here are some other things, if I get the 3820, I can get the ASUS Rampage IV Extreme, if I get a LGA1155, I can get pretty much any board below $360. What should I do?
  12. Quote:
    waste your money...


    Haha, okay final question. Last, I promise.

    3820 or 2700K?
  13. sarinaide said:
    There is absolutely no reason to buy a 3820, it is slower than a 2600 and 2700 let alone the Ivy Bridge offerings and it costs stupid money for a half baked chip.

    64GB RAM does nothing for your, you will barely saturate 4GB, thats a waste of cash to be honest.


    What is with people saying this still? My system just at idle not doing anything other than running my usual programs is at 4.5GB RAM used.

    I stat doing things and 6GB-8GB is common... closer to 10GB is where I rarely see it getting to. While 64 may be a bit much different people do different things requiring different amounts of hardware. You might only need 4Gb, I might only feel the need for 16GB, maybe he needs 64 god damn GB.

    I for one went with the i7-3930k and... well... it is badass, performs quite better @ stock than my i7-960 did overclocked to 4GHz
  14. 2700K it is then :)

    Thanks verbalizer, Jack, izoli, sarinaide and the other unregistered guy haha :)
  15. Guys,

    ASUS P8Z77 V - Pro or Asrock Fatal1ty Z77 Professional? Need quick answer!
  16. izoli said:
    What is with people saying this still? My system just at idle not doing anything other than running my usual programs is at 4.5GB RAM used.

    I stat doing things and 6GB-8GB is common... closer to 10GB is where I rarely see it getting to.

    The "4GB ought to be enough for everybody" crowd annoys me as well.

    Upgrading to 8GB substantially reduced the amount of swapping and other disk activity for lots of stuff I do on a regular basis, going back down to 4GB would drive me nuts. Were it not for the ridiculous prices on DDR2 these days, I would have upgraded to 16GB to reduce the amount and likelihood/frequency of "pagefile lag" even further. With all my usual programs and related data loaded, I use 10-14GB of memory, which makes 16GB ideal if I want to tab between programs with little to no paging.
  17. Best answer selected by arzbhatia.
  18. My final build:

    Motherboard: ASUS Maximus V Extreme
    Processor: Intel Core i7 3770K Ivy Bridge
    GPU: Sapphire HD Radeon 6950 2GB DDR5 256-Bit
    RAM:

    G.Skill RipJawsX (RED) 8GB 1600Mhz (4gb x 2)

    G.Skill RipJawsX (BLUE) 16GB 1600Mhz (8gb x 2)

    24GB Total

    HDD:

    WD Caviar Black 1TB 7200rpm

    Seagate Barracuda XT 1TB 7200rpm

    x2 WD Green 1TB 7200rpm

    Cooling: Corsair H100
    PSU: CM 700w
    Case: Corsair Carbide 500R
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