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How to use macro correctly to get nice picture with Sony T1

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Anonymous
June 25, 2005 9:32:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I am very happy with the performance of Sony T1 P&S digicam.
But I'm having problems with taking nice flower shots with "macro".
Could someone give me how to do good macro shot? Satoshi
Anonymous
June 26, 2005 12:44:27 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Macro distances mean that best results are achieved by using a smaller
f/stop so that a larger portion of the subject remains in focus, front
to rear. Good macro is also achieved via good lighting...so on a
flower, a bit of backlighting can make the flower more vivid. Also,
shooting on overcast days make flower colors appear nicer than on
bright sunny days.

--Wilt
Anonymous
June 26, 2005 8:44:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

wilt <wiltw@aol.com> wrote:
: Macro distances mean that best results are achieved by using a smaller
: f/stop so that a larger portion of the subject remains in focus, front
: to rear. Good macro is also achieved via good lighting...so on a
: flower, a bit of backlighting can make the flower more vivid. Also,
: shooting on overcast days make flower colors appear nicer than on
: bright sunny days.

One other piece of advice. When possible introduce a "size comparator"
element. When taking macro images of flowers it is easy to loose any
indication of the size of the flower. Sometimes this can subtly detract
from the impact of the image. But if something of an appropriate size that
most people will recognize can bring back the "wow". This object does not
even have to specifically be in focus. For example I have taken macros of
tiny little delicate flowers, filling the frame, and they don't look very
interresting. But by pulling back a tiny bit and introducing a dime into
the background makes the delicacy of these tiny flowers obvious. I have
even simply used my finger to "support" the flower, bringing them into a
frame of reference. Of course this means that you have to be able to shoot
fast enough to minimize both camera shake and the subject shake imparted
by your other hand. :) 

The same idea holds true for large subjects too. Even posing a person
beside or even behind a large spike of foliage shows the massive size. In
fact when the person is behind the subject, looking at it, with the person
thrown out of focus, it can draw the eye of the viewer to the desired
subject.

Randy

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Randy Berbaum
Champaign, IL
!