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How do I connect this Front Panel Board?

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  • Front Panel
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Last response: in Components
August 10, 2012 4:43:15 AM

Hello,

I have found this old PC with a cool front panel with a board that has no brand name on it. I would like to know how to connect it to my mother board since the wires have been cut...

Here is a pic of it:



My doubt is about the wires in the upright corner:
- the +12V in yellow
- the +5V in red
- the blue wire
- the white wire
Where do they go? USB has no +12V... Front panel IEEE 1394a-2000 has no +5V...

Any suggestion?

Thank you!!!!!

Here there is another picture:

More about : connect front panel board

a b ) Power supply
August 10, 2012 4:57:18 PM

What make/model of PC did it come out of? Also, do you have a clue what function it performed in the old PC. Since it has a battery on it, I would be VERY careful before I connected it to any modern system. I also see that it has a speaker on it.
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a c 159 ) Power supply
August 10, 2012 5:32:47 PM

The only thing that I got on Google was a Korg Triton LCD touch display PCB. If you look at the bottom of the board in the top picture you can see the KT emblem and the PCB ID numbers. LCD touch display doesn't seem to match up with an older part. What does the panel do or control in the PC?
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August 10, 2012 5:48:18 PM

Rugger said:
The only thing that I got on Google was a Korg Triton LCD touch display PCB. If you look at the bottom of the board in the top picture you can see the KT emblem and the PCB ID numbers. LCD touch display doesn't seem to match up with an older part. What does the panel do or control in the PC?


The LCD doesn't seem a touch screen, at all.
It is an old PC (maybe 2004) and I guess that the panel measures temperatures, since the PCB has thermistor probes for HDD, CPU and VGA. I've never seen it working, since I've received this PC without power supply and with certain wires cut, like the ones shown in the pictures.
I'm trying to refurbish it and this front panel is the only thing left to be connected before power up!

Need more pictures?
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a b ) Power supply
August 10, 2012 5:48:54 PM

ZioAlfredo said:
The LCD doesn't seem a touch screen, at all.
It is an old PC (maybe 2004) and I guess that the panel measures temperatures, since the PCB has thermistor probes for HDD, CPU and VGA. I've never seen it working, since I've received this PC without power supply and with certain wires cut, like the ones shown in the pictures.
I'm trying to refurbish it and this front panel is the only thing left to be connected before power up!

Need more pictures?

What make/model of PC did it come out of?
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August 10, 2012 6:08:00 PM

COLGeek said:
What make/model of PC did it come out of?


Its mother board is the Intel® Desktop Board D865PERL, equipped with an Intel® Pentium® 4 (3.20E GHz/ 800 MHz/1 MB)
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August 11, 2012 10:38:05 AM

Here you can finde more pics:














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August 14, 2012 4:21:44 AM

It was a 4 pin molex!!!! I connected it to the Molex mini-spox and it lighted up!

I still don't know how to connect a fan to the red green and blue wires that come out from the PCB...
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a b ) Power supply
August 14, 2012 1:07:56 PM

ZioAlfredo said:
Its mother board is the Intel® Desktop Board D865PERL, equipped with an Intel® Pentium® 4 (3.20E GHz/ 800 MHz/1 MB)

This doesn't help. The motherboard is a generic "vanilla" component. If you knew the make/model of the computer (you said it came out of a case earlier) you might be able to track down a user manual or parts list for the old system. If you don't have the info, that is fine. Just continue to tinker with it.

Please let us know how this turns out.

Good luck!
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August 14, 2012 3:04:13 PM

Rugger said:
http://pcbheaven.com/wikipages/How_PC_Fans_Work/
The description of the 3-pin fan has the wiring breakout.


Thank you!

Thanks to that I could properly connect the CPU fan and, magically, the whole system booted up!!!!

I guess the CR2032 motherboard battery is exhausted, as well as the one in the front panel board. I'm going to replace them.

I also want to to buy two chassis fans to help ventilation.

I still need to install an extra RAM module of 512 Mb (DDR400). The motherboard supports dual channel and the bank module I have is of the same type.
Any precautions to take?

Thank you.
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a c 159 ) Power supply
August 14, 2012 3:20:27 PM

Best price/performance on fans for me are Yate Loon D12SL-12s for 4/$20..I like having a couple of spares around: http://www.petrastechshop.com/12yalod1cafa.html
Fan review: http://www.overclock3d.net/reviews/cases_cooling/yate_l...

As far as the RAM goes...just make sure that its oriented correctly. One other note on the RAM is default voltage...if they don't use the same default voltages then you'll be applying too much power to one or not enough to the other. Just something to be aware of...potential for instability or underpeforming.

Edit: You should be able to google the model numbers from the DIMMs and find mfr support site that will tell you defaut voltages. The point is moot if the mobo doesn't allow you to adjust Vdimm...
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August 16, 2012 3:22:35 AM

Rugger said:
Best price/performance on fans for me are Yate Loon D12SL-12s for 4/$20..I like having a couple of spares around: http://www.petrastechshop.com/12yalod1cafa.html
Fan review: http://www.overclock3d.net/reviews/cases_cooling/yate_l...

As far as the RAM goes...just make sure that its oriented correctly. One other note on the RAM is default voltage...if they don't use the same default voltages then you'll be applying too much power to one or not enough to the other. Just something to be aware of...potential for instability or underpeforming.

Edit: You should be able to google the model numbers from the DIMMs and find mfr support site that will tell you defaut voltages. The point is moot if the mobo doesn't allow you to adjust Vdimm...



Thank you for your support.

The PC could pass the POST! I could access the BIOS menu, as you can see in the following picture:



I could even try Ubuntu on it for a half an hour.

Today I even added an extra RAM module of 512Mb (DDR400) reaching 1Gb of RAM!

Nevertheless, after approximately 10 minutes of operation, I felt a smell of burning plastic and the PC shut down.

I've noticed that the video card had reached 56 deg Celsius of temperature before the shutdown. It is a GeForce:



After that, the PC could not start any more. Although the motherboard had power (power led lighted up):




What could have happened? I don't wanna think the microprocessor burnt out... Yesterday it worked for half an hour without problems and today operated for just 10 minutes...

How can I figure out what is wrong?

Thank you
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a c 159 ) Power supply
August 16, 2012 12:03:06 PM

What are you're complete system components? The first thing I would do is remove any hardware that was added before you started getting the shutdowns (the extra stick of RAM is the only thing I know for sure). Could be bad wiring or an old component burning out. If removing the RAM doesn't work, then the best way to find the culprit is to breadboard with a minimal build and start adding components one at a time. After adding each component you stress test the system for stability. Do you have integrated graphics or only the FX5200? By minimal build I mean the following components: motherboard, CPU, and one stick of RAM, boot HDD; build is done external to the case on a static free surface like a phone book or a wood cutting board. Breadboarding guide: http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/page-262730_13_0.ht...
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August 16, 2012 12:55:58 PM

Rugger said:
What are you're complete system components? The first thing I would do is remove any hardware that was added before you started getting the shutdowns (the extra stick of RAM is the only thing I know for sure). Could be bad wiring or an old component burning out. If removing the RAM doesn't work, then the best way to find the culprit is to breadboard with a minimal build and start adding components one at a time. After adding each component you stress test the system for stability. Do you have integrated graphics or only the FX5200? By minimal build I mean the following components: motherboard, CPU, and one stick of RAM, boot HDD; build is done external to the case on a static free surface like a phone book or a wood cutting board. Breadboarding guide: http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/page-262730_13_0.ht...


My system components are:

- Motherboard Intel Desktop D865perl (with NO integrated graphics)
- Pentium 4 3.2GHz/800MHz/1MB
- Video card GeForce FX5200
- RAM module DDR400 512Mb
- PSU of 400 W
- HDD of 80Gb (IDE)
- DVD reader/writer (SONY)
- DVD reader (Toshiba)
- front panel board (now working)

I've tried to remove the extra RAM module but it didn't work...

I'll try the minimal build.

Do you know what could have happened?

Thank you so much.
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Best solution

a c 159 ) Power supply
August 16, 2012 1:10:02 PM

If removing the extram RAM module didn't work then I recommend breadboarding with the minimal components plus the GPU since you don't have integrated graphics. If that is stable then add one component at a time until your system is unstable and you've found the bad component. You can also take a look for bad capacitors on the motherboard. Bad capacitors:
How to identify bad caps: http://www.badcaps.net/pages.php?vid=5
Pics of bad caps: https://www.google.com/search?q=bad+capacitors&hl=en&bi...
The cps don't have to be leaking to be bad. Bulging caps (typically on the top of the cap) are bad too.
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August 18, 2012 7:18:25 PM

Rugger said:
If removing the extram RAM module didn't work then I recommend breadboarding with the minimal components plus the GPU since you don't have integrated graphics. If that is stable then add one component at a time until your system is unstable and you've found the bad component. You can also take a look for bad capacitors on the motherboard. Bad capacitors:
How to identify bad caps: http://www.badcaps.net/pages.php?vid=5
Pics of bad caps: https://www.google.com/search?q=bad+capacitors&hl=en&bi...
The cps don't have to be leaking to be bad. Bulging caps (typically on the top of the cap) are bad too.


I have examined the mobo caps, but I couldn't fin any with apparent defects.
I've also tried to power the PC without RAMs, to see if it emitted some long beep error, but it did do nothing.
The only thing I've noticed is the power LED turning on when I turn on the PSU.
Another thing to which I payed attention is the PSU fan. It stay still when I turn on the PSU, shouldn't it spin?

Thank you
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August 22, 2012 2:14:22 AM

Best answer selected by ZioAlfredo.
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a c 159 ) Power supply
August 22, 2012 12:20:21 PM

It should spin unless the PSU is designed for the the fan not to spin at low loads....and that's not a common feature. You may have a bad PSU.
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August 25, 2012 2:11:42 AM

Rugger said:
It should spin unless the PSU is designed for the the fan not to spin at low loads....and that's not a common feature. You may have a bad PSU.


In fact, I have figured out that my PSU was burnt out!
It does not supply power any more.
I'll try with a new one.
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a c 159 ) Power supply
August 25, 2012 11:12:12 AM

Sounds great - I want to see this thing power up now!
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August 25, 2012 5:26:56 PM

Rugger said:
Sounds great - I want to see this thing power up now!


It finally did!!! :bounce: 

First, brand new Power Supply, with 500 real Watts!




Then, a good molex connection for the front panel board, which is now working, measuring temperatures:



And then, the magic moment:



Now... Up and Running!!!!



Thank you all, guys!!


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a c 159 ) Power supply
August 27, 2012 11:35:55 AM

Glad we could help and you were able to resurrect this surly old PC!
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