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I5 2500 Temperature Too High

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  • CPUs
  • Intel i5
  • Temperature
  • Product
Last response: in CPUs
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August 10, 2012 7:54:07 AM

Hello,

I have an i5 2500 CPU, no overclocking, with a stock cooler. I was recently introduced to my CPU temperatures, my CPU reaches high temperatures during the game - 65~67 degrees in Crysis 2. I ran OCCT test, and 3 minutes later the temperatures jumped up to ~73.

I realized that as long as the computer isn't shutting itself down, it's fine. I haven't had any problems with my computer over the three weeks, it's been running as beautifully as it can.

Case is the Gigabyte GZ-G1 Plus, with the four stock fans:
http://uk.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=4....

Thanks.

More about : 2500 temperature high

a b à CPUs
August 10, 2012 2:55:56 PM

Unless you're hitting over 80c you don't need to worry about it. If you start to hit the 79-80c mark you might want to start looking in to an aftermarket CPU cooler.
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August 10, 2012 3:22:03 PM

XSR said:
intel:
http://ark.intel.com/products/52209/Intel-Core-i5-2500-...(6M-Cache-up-to-3_70-GHz).
Quote:
TCASE | 72.6°C

Does it matter?


Your gaming temps are below that, so no worries. Even if you hit that temp gaming it wouldn't be an issue unless you play games 24/7.

On a side note, what program are you using to monitor temps?
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a b à CPUs
August 10, 2012 4:10:34 PM

OCCT test stresses the CPU to the max, so it will reach max operating temp 72.6°C.

Best it to get some good CPU cooler. That way u can OC too and still keep the temps down.
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August 10, 2012 4:10:54 PM

trapper said:
Your gaming temps are below that, so no worries. Even if you hit that temp gaming it wouldn't be an issue unless you play games 24/7.

On a side note, what program are you using to monitor temps?


You're right.

I use HWMonitor to monitor the temperatures of my hardware. Why do you ask?

Thanks for the responses.
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a b à CPUs
August 10, 2012 4:15:45 PM

"Case is the Gigabyte GZ-G1 Plus, with the four stock fans."

The case fans are for moving the hot air out of the case.

They only help to cool the CPU and other parts, but only CPU cooler will do the job.

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a b à CPUs
August 10, 2012 4:17:20 PM

BTW, do u have i5 2500 or i5 2500K?
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August 10, 2012 4:33:58 PM

XSR said:
I can't overclock my CPU, i have an i5 2500 without "K" suffix. The non "K" models are hard to overclock.

If you didn’t buy a K-series chip and instead got a Core i7-2600, Core i5-2500, -2400, or -2300 (along with a P67,Z77-based motherboard), you’ll still have access to “limited unlocking.”

This basically means you can set clock rates up to four speed bins above the highest Turbo Boost frequency setting available at any given level of processor activity.

So, take a Core i7-2600 as an example. The chip’s base clock is 3.3 GHz. With four cores active, it gets one bin worth of additional performance—3.4 GHz. Four bins above that would be 3.8 GHz. With two cores active, Turbo Boost bumps it up two bins, to 3.5 GHz. Limited overclocking makes 3.9 GHz available in that case. In a best-case scenario, only one core is active. Turbo Boost adds four bins of frequency, yielding 3.7 GHz, and Intel’s overclocking scheme lets you run at up to 4.1 GHz.

Anyone with a K-series CPU overclocking on air is going to be in good shape. Thomas and I both have Core i7-2600Ks that’ll do 4.7 GHz at 1.35 V all day long. More mainstream folks with non-K i5s and i7s will at least have an extra 400 MHz to milk from their chips. It’s the value-oriented buyers with processor budgets between $100 and $150 (where AMD offers some of its best deals) who get screwed. The only two Sandy Bridge-based options under $175 are the Core i3-2100 and -2120 at 3.1 and 3.3 GHz, respectively. No Turbo, no BCLK option, no limited unlock—those chips are quite literally stuck.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/sandy-bridge-core-i...
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