Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

Intel 3770 Clock Speeds are reducing!

Last response: in CPUs
Share
a b à CPUs
August 11, 2012 9:33:20 AM

My intel 3770 reduces its clock speed when not under load! Is this normal?
Aren't the clock speeds suppose to ramp up to 3.9ghz?
Is this a good thing or a bad thing and if its bad how can fix this?

Best solution

a b à CPUs
August 11, 2012 10:27:08 AM

It's normal. It's an energy saving technology common in recent CPUs. When idling the the clock speed goes down and when under load it ''wakes up'' and gets to work at full speed.
If you want to you can disable this feature on the BIOS but unless you're going to overclock there's no real reason for it
Share
August 11, 2012 12:22:31 PM

The actually technology is called "Intel Speedstep" and I think it's kind of a pain. However under a real load from gaming, synthetic stress tests, or video converting, your i7-3770K will run at either 3.4GHz or 3.9GHz depending on the load put on the CPU.

If you want to disable, there is an option in your BIOS, and it won't hurt anything.
Score
0
Related resources
August 11, 2012 12:34:44 PM

It will last longer i guess :D 
Score
0
a c 117 à CPUs
August 11, 2012 2:42:06 PM

dansgas1000 said:
It will last longer i guess :D 

The main motivation behind SpeedStep is power saving. With SpeedStep, dynamic voltage and sleep states, today's CPUs use as much as 90% less power when idle/low-load than they otherwise would.

CPUs already had 10+ years lifespans under normal operating conditions before the big push to improve power saving, so whatever lifespan gains from power saving there may be would fall well outside most PC's useful life.
Score
0
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 4:42:35 AM

stant1rm said:
The actually technology is called "Intel Speedstep" and I think it's kind of a pain. However under a real load from gaming, synthetic stress tests, or video converting, your i7-3770K will run at either 3.4GHz or 3.9GHz depending on the load put on the CPU.

If you want to disable, there is an option in your BIOS, and it won't hurt anything.

Why Do you call it a pain?
Score
0
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 7:55:49 AM

InvalidError said:
The main motivation behind SpeedStep is power saving. With SpeedStep, dynamic voltage and sleep states, today's CPUs use as much as 90% less power when idle/low-load than they otherwise would.

CPUs already had 10+ years lifespans under normal operating conditions before the big push to improve power saving, so whatever lifespan gains from power saving there may be would fall well outside most PC's useful life.

But if the cpu heat up and cools down over and over, wont it reduce the life of the cpu?
Score
0
a c 117 à CPUs
August 12, 2012 12:25:29 PM

timarp000 said:
But if the cpu heat up and cools down over and over, wont it reduce the life of the cpu?

While thermal cycling is a potential problem, even pre-SpeedStep CPUs already had significant temperature change between idle and full-load yet I do not remember hearing about excessive failure rates for P2, P3, K7, Athlon, etc. CPUs.

The only major thermal cycling fail I remember reading about is nVidia GPUs from a couple of years ago due to using the wrong type of solder balls to attach the die to the substrate. This caused the solder balls to break due to being too stiff to cope with the thermal expansion mismatch.
Score
0
a b à CPUs
August 19, 2012 4:20:08 PM

Best answer selected by timarp000.
Score
0
a b à CPUs
August 31, 2012 5:45:16 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
Score
0
!