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Future CPU's

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August 11, 2012 12:56:08 PM

OK is the new 2011 CPU going the way the 1366 went. I am thinking of updating my system right now I have the 1366 i7 960 on a asus p6x58d-premium MB. Is the 1155 ivy bridge the way to go I know this stuff changes fast but I don't wont to get stuck with a dead horse again.

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August 11, 2012 1:11:53 PM

If by "dead horse" you mean end-of-line socket, Ivy Bridge will be the last LGA1155 generation. Haswell which is expected around mid-2013 will have LGA1150 and Haswell's successor will be a DDR4 MCM affair with built-in IO hub which almost certainly means yet another socket.

So if end-of-line sockets bother you that much, you'll have to skip the next 5-6 years worth of Intel CPUs or resign yourself to having to change motherboards with almost every CPU upgrade.
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August 11, 2012 1:14:46 PM

The current Ivy Bridge chips are basically just Sandy Bridge chips on a smaller die and a bigger GPU on board. So performance wise you should see overall a nice increase over the 45nm i7 depending on what you do with the system.

Granted the Bloomfield i7's are still pretty powerful by todays standard, so i personally wouldn't upgrade unless i really needed to, like if i was into doing CAD work, DCC etc. But as strictly a gaming machine, i wouldn't upgrade until i see the i7 fall to it's knees. If that is the case, then Ivy Bridge is the next nest thing as of current, though if you have a little more money and need performace then the 2011 Sandy Bridge chips should meet your needs.
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August 11, 2012 1:17:25 PM

I believe the Ivy Bridge-E series will be released just prior to the release of Haswell; either in late Q1 2013 or early Q2 2013.
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August 11, 2012 1:30:08 PM

What I was getting at is with the 1366 there are hardly any CPU's for sale like it is not made any more. I am just looking to upgrade my system, heck the 1155 has been around a lot longer then the 1366. There is not a big selection of 1366 MB companied to the 1155, I was looking at the 2011 but I just don't know which way to go. It's mostly for every day use and gaming.
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August 11, 2012 1:43:03 PM

For everyday gaming just go with the current socket 1155 Ivy Bridge CPUs.

If you were doing heavy 3D rendering or video encoding, then I would likely recommend the the socket 2011 Sandy Bridge-E CPUs.

Socket 1366 is dead and should be left alone.
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August 11, 2012 1:46:21 PM

fitter1964 said:
What I was getting at is with the 1366 there are hardly any CPU's for sale like it is not made any more. I am just looking to upgrade my system, heck the 1155 has been around a lot longer then the 1366. There is not a big selection of 1366 MB companied to the 1155, I was looking at the 2011 but I just don't know which way to go. It's mostly for every day use and gaming.


That's because the Bloomfield Core i7's are not sold very much any more (you can still find i7 960's on Newegg though, but for over $300) and X58 has been hit it's EOL stage.

If you're focus is "everyday use and gaming", then i'd focus probably more on the GPU, what card are you currently running?. Moing over to an LGA 2011 board will grant you a new line of chips (SB-E) which do perfrom very well, but they really aren't the chips i would go with simply for gaming, as they really are meant for people who use heavily threaded software ,which currently gaming still hasn't fully pushed past into that.

It might be best just to wait when it comes to CPU performance.
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August 11, 2012 1:58:43 PM

Right now I have the evga GTX 560 TI I was looking at the GTX 680 for my next one.
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August 11, 2012 2:21:39 PM

I would stick with your i7-960 and go with the GTX 670 instead of the GTX 680.

The GTX 670's performance is 90% of the GTX 680 and is around $100 less (last time I've checked). A small overclock can bring it up to the GTX 680 performance level. The GTX 680 is a great card though if you don't mind paying the premium for it.
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August 11, 2012 2:33:03 PM

Best answer selected by fitter1964.
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August 11, 2012 2:34:06 PM

jaguarskx said:
I would stick with your i7-960 and go with the GTX 670 instead of the GTX 680.

The GTX 670's performance is 90% of the GTX 680 and is around $100 less (last time I've checked). A small overclock can bring it up to the GTX 680 performance level. The GTX 680 is a great card though if you don't mind paying the premium for it.


Thanks for your input
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August 11, 2012 2:40:28 PM

This topic has been closed by Pyree
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