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Risks when building a computer?

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April 28, 2012 9:12:32 PM

Can I have some lists of dangers when building a computer, e.g. static shocking the hard disk, and how to prevent that? I'm really badly worried about building my own PC, my dad has good experience with hardware, although slightly outdated he knows what he's doing mostly, but I'd just like a list of stuff to help me make sure I don't break any of the components.
April 28, 2012 9:20:52 PM

Wear cotton clothing
ideally wok on a wooden table top

Touch the case with your hands before handling components

avoid touching electrical contacts

RAM is the most sensitive component , followed by graphics RAM

Take your time . Read the instructions

Keep in mind that 99% of the worlds computers are assembled by people who work for $30 a month and have no education ..........its not that hard
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April 28, 2012 9:21:22 PM

Lieutenant Awesome said:
Can I have some lists of dangers when building a computer, e.g. static shocking the hard disk, and how to prevent that? I'm really badly worried about building my own PC, my dad has good experience with hardware, although slightly outdated he knows what he's doing mostly, but I'd just like a list of stuff to help me make sure I don't break any of the components.


I just finished building my computer, and the one problem I had was installing the CPU onto the motherboard. I'd watch out for the pins and make sure you don't bend them, this was my own error but if anything, I'd just be careful with the parts, and inspect the motherboard pins by the CPU before you buy it. It's very hard to notice a small bent pin.
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April 28, 2012 9:27:03 PM

from personal experience from building mines last week.

1. Keep your hands static free
2. Its safer to install sensitive parts first because its a hassle trying to fit sensitive parts when everything else is installed(i.e install ram then gpu. do wire plugging last besides the hdd plugs depending on which direction the sata cords are in your case.
3. BE SURE TO KEEP ALL WIRES AWAY FROM FANS. yesterday i was wondering why my cpu fan wasn't working, a wire was holding it down, my idiot self tried to do it while the computer was on, minor cuts.
4. double check that your cpu fan and cpu are installed correctly. The instalation of the cpu will feel like its about to crack the mobo, but the high pressure on the chip is normal, so it doesn't move.
5. Work in a well lit room. best location would be a flat desk. have the manual open and read it at all times before instalation of a product.
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April 28, 2012 9:27:13 PM

If you are worried about shocking any components from static electricity discharge then get yourself one of the wrist grounding straps(i dont know the actual name). It basically grounds you to the computer case and will prevent a static discharge.

Also if you are using a AMD cpu make sure you align the pins correctly with the socket.

its also not a good idea to build or leave bare components (video card, mobo) on the carpet.
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April 28, 2012 9:41:10 PM

I was under the impression that fitting a CPU without bending the pins wasn't amazingly difficult, but now it is? Do I need serious skill and experience to fit it without damaging it, or if I just concentrate properly then will it be fine?
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April 28, 2012 9:51:40 PM

Lieutenant Awesome said:
I was under the impression that fitting a CPU without bending the pins wasn't amazingly difficult, but now it is? Do I need serious skill and experience to fit it without damaging it, or if I just concentrate properly then will it be fine?


No it's very easy. Never touch the pin side of the CPU. Unlock the CPU tray locking arm, line up the gold arrows, place it down gently and it wall fall into place, then lock it in. I think what the other guy was referring too taking some pressure is tightening the CPU heatsink which can be worrisome if you've never done it before. But remember tight is a good thing. You shouldn't have any problems...
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April 28, 2012 9:52:04 PM

you are correct, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to install a cpu lol. AMD processors have one corner of the cpu marked with a triangle, you align that with the triangle on the actual socket on the motherboard and your good to go. Intel processors have little 2 little adjacent notches on 2 sides of the cpu. If you don't have the notches aligned correctly the cpu simply wont fit.

if aligned properly, the processor will practically fall/slide into the socket by its own free weight.
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April 28, 2012 10:58:58 PM

+1 to ALL of the above...

Have your tools already at hand. You will find that even tweezers have their use. A small flashlight will be of use. Going to get "something" is just asking for static buildup. Don't touch any of the connection points on the RAM or add-in cards. Even being grounded you may regret that later.

Have several small containers handy for all the bits and pieces as you open each component. Look at everything you have and plan out what order you want to install everything. Ram before video (see dudewitbow's comment). Possibly drives before MB if drive bay opening are towards the MB and a MB component may be jostled as the drives are put in..

It is also nice to have another PC for that last minute check on-line for info.

I have even been told that once you have opened an antistatic bag to rest the component on the bag until installation.

Keep all the extra screws and pieces for later modifications and upgrades.
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April 28, 2012 11:00:36 PM

Actually, placing the motherboard on the antistatic bag is not recommended. Either use a wood clean surface that is flat or the motherboard box.
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April 29, 2012 8:43:30 PM

I have a wooden desk, but I think it's laminate. This ok?
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June 11, 2013 2:06:57 PM

Putting a component on an anti-static bag is a big NO. Put it on a flat surface which won't conduct electricity, i.e. wood
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