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a c 146 à CPUs
a b À AMD
August 12, 2012 1:03:29 AM

It doesn't surprise me and right now with the way they are going I wouldn't put any money in their stock either.
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 1:32:19 AM

I'd figure you would be around mal...

@rds1220: would you put your money in bonds? The risk of default according to the rating agency is BB or BBB.
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a c 473 à CPUs
a c 119 À AMD
August 12, 2012 1:36:31 AM

I might short the stock when it goes higher.
a c 78 à CPUs
August 12, 2012 2:40:32 AM

dogman_1234 said:


Opinions?

Not a cause for celebration for sure. We're one step closer to another monopoly. $500 for an i5 here we come!!!! :love: 
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 2:51:55 AM

nekulturny said:
Not a cause for celebration for sure. We're one step closer to another monopoly. $500 for an i5 here we come!!!! :love: 

:ouch:  :pt1cable:  :lol: 

So, you are one of the odd one are you not?
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 2:52:34 AM

Personally, I would buy them if they were to default. I'd give them 5 bucks to be sole owner of the business.
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 3:15:48 AM

Care to share some investment tips then?

;P
a c 146 à CPUs
a b À AMD
August 12, 2012 4:31:39 AM

dogman_1234 said:
Care to share some investment tips then?

;P


Yea buy stock in Intel atleast they're stock is going up (the last time I checked).
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 5:39:47 AM

How about a stock that actually makes you money? One that pays dividend?
a c 146 à CPUs
a b À AMD
August 12, 2012 5:50:45 AM

Intels stock has been making me money. First Sandy Bridges, then Ivy Bridges and now the ultra book. All those things have helped keep the stock steady or go up.
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 6:33:54 AM

What if Intel hits a snag in corporate growth?
a c 146 à CPUs
a b À AMD
August 12, 2012 6:41:13 AM

Than we will see what happens. My guess is the stock would go down and I would sell it off. You can throw a million what if's out there but right now Intels stock is keeping pretty steady, AMD is not.
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 8:10:20 AM

AMD is showing signs of a failing company. They need leadership! Get rid of glofo, revamp engineers/R&D, and pay for advertising!
August 12, 2012 11:04:24 AM

dogman_1234 said:
AMD is showing signs of a failing company. They need leadership! Get rid of glofo, revamp engineers/R&D, and pay for advertising!


I totally agree here in the middle east like or to be more Accurate Qatar, Not much know about AMD just a little all they know intel is the best company...there all intel FANS ):
a c 146 à CPUs
a b À AMD
August 12, 2012 3:03:15 PM

dogman_1234 said:
AMD is showing signs of a failing company. They need leadership! Get rid of glofo, revamp engineers/R&D, and pay for advertising!


No kidding it's been that way for awhile and it's worse now. How can they have leadership when half the leaders jumped ship after the Bulldozer disaster.
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 4:37:29 PM

How old does someone need to be to become a CEO? How does a CEO appeal to the BoD and the stock holders?
a c 78 à CPUs
August 12, 2012 4:39:45 PM

I don't think there is an age requirement to being a CEO beyond the age of majority. (18), since you have to be 18 to own stock and exercise voting rights, and enter into legal contracts and whatnot.
a c 473 à CPUs
a c 119 À AMD
August 12, 2012 4:55:56 PM

dogman_1234 said:
How about a stock that actually makes you money? One that pays dividend?


I recommend a company called American Capital Agency (ticker: AGNC). It is a REIT type company and pays a high dividend.

REITs are Real Estate Investment Trusts. AGNC in particular makes money from agency originated mortgages (Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac; i.e. 100% backed by the US government) based on the interest spread between the Federal interest rate and the mortgage's interest rate. The large majority of mortgages that AGNC invests in are fixed interest mortgages. They also do a little bit of hedging investments in the event interest rates increases.

REITs pay a high dividend because the company is structured in a way that most of the revenue (90% I believe) are paid out to investors as dividend. AGNC pay a $5 annual dividend ($1.25 quarterly). Based on it's current share price of $33.89, the dividend rate is 14.73%.

I suggest you do some research about REITs and AGNC before deciding if this particular stock is a good investment for you. Things to know:

1. The Federal interest rate is going to be low until 2014, perhaps until 2015. This means that interest rate spread on the fixed mortgage rate will be pretty stable and AGNC will have enough cashflow to pay the quarterly $1.25 dividend.

2. Since REITs pays out the vast majority of revenue as dividends they have very little money to make additional investments. They get around this by issuing more stock shares with a slight discount (if current stock price is $34, the stock offer may be $33.33) in order to raise cash for additional investments. This is standard policy and generally nothing to worry about. However, if the purpose of the stock offer is to raise money to pay operating expense and make the dividend payout, then that is a warning sign.

3. REITs must deal with something called CPR which is Current Prepayment Rate. When you take out a mortgage for your home you are basically signing a contract with the lending bank that you guarantee you will be making monthly payments to the bank to pay off your mortgage. If you decide to pay more than the minimum balance, then that extra amount is known as a prepayment. The prepayment is applied directly to the mortgage amount you borrowed. Make enough prepayment amounts over a period of time means your 30 year mortgage can be paid off in fewer years. If you manage to payoff a 30 year mortgage in 28 years, you just saved yourself some money, the bank makes less money and the REIT makes less money.


Company homepage:
http://www.agnc.com/

Reading material:
http://seekingalpha.com/article/787251-are-mreits-a-goo...

http://seekingalpha.com/article/785431-agnc-14-dividend...

http://seekingalpha.com/article/782791-american-capital...
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 5:05:28 PM

What about bonds? Muni, corp, and federal?
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 5:05:29 PM

jaguarskx said:
I recommend a company called American Capital Agency (ticker: AGNC). It is a REIT type company and pays a high dividend.

REITs are Real Estate Investment Trusts. AGNC in particular makes money from agency originated mortgages (Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac; i.e. 100% backed by the US government) based on the interest spread between the Federal interest rate and the mortgage's interest rate. The large majority of mortgages that AGNC invests in are fixed interest mortgages. They also do a little bit of hedging investments in the event interest rates increases.

REITs pay a high dividend because the company is structured in a way that most of the revenue (90% I believe) are paid out to investors as dividend. AGNC pay a $5 annual dividend ($1.25 quarterly). Based on it's current share price of $33.89, the dividend rate is 14.73%.

I suggest you do some research about REITs and AGNC before deciding if this particular stock is a good investment for you. Things to know:

1. The Federal interest rate is going to be low until 2014, perhaps until 2015. This means that interest rate spread on the fixed mortgage rate will be pretty stable and AGNC will have enough cashflow to pay the quarterly $1.25 dividend.

2. Since REITs pays out the vast majority of revenue as dividends they have very little money to make additional investments. They get around this by issuing more stock shares with a slight discount (if current stock price is $34, the stock offer may be $33.33) in order to raise cash for additional investments. This is standard policy and generally nothing to worry about. However, if the purpose of the stock offer is to raise money to pay operating expense and make the dividend payout, then that is a warning sign.

3. REITs must deal with something called CPR which is Current Prepayment Rate. When you take out a mortgage for your home you are basically signing a contract with the lending bank that you guarantee you will be making monthly payments to the bank to pay off your mortgage. If you decide to pay more than the minimum balance, then that extra amount is known as a prepayment. The prepayment is applied directly to the mortgage amount you borrowed. Make enough prepayment amounts over a period of time means your 30 year mortgage can be paid off in fewer years. If you manage to payoff a 30 year mortgage in 28 years, you just saved yourself some money, the bank makes less money and the REIT makes less money.


Company homepage:
http://www.agnc.com/

Reading material:
http://seekingalpha.com/article/787251-are-mreits-a-goo...

http://seekingalpha.com/article/785431-agnc-14-dividend...

http://seekingalpha.com/article/782791-american-capital...

Might have to look into it. i worry about the high risk is all, I would like to start out with a small capital investment and build over the long run.
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 5:06:06 PM

nekulturny said:
I don't think there is an age requirement to being a CEO beyond the age of majority. (18), since you have to be 18 to own stock and exercise voting rights, and enter into legal contracts and whatnot.

Okay. How does one convince the BoD to hire you?
a c 78 à CPUs
August 12, 2012 5:09:37 PM

dogman_1234 said:
Okay. How does one convince the BoD to hire you?

Not a clue lol. I doubt they would hire an 18 year old though.
a c 473 à CPUs
a c 119 À AMD
August 12, 2012 5:16:11 PM

In general, I would be wary of the current state of the US economy (high unemployment and layoffs are still coming) and the turmoil going on in Europe. Things are going to get worse in Europe before they get better.

I do not see any justification for the current trend in the stock market. I think people are currently investing into the stock market because they don't want to "miss the ride". I think the ride is going to come to an end. I would estimate that the DOW will probably reach a peak of around 13,500 before the market starts to slowly correct itself... a correction of probably 10% or 15% on the extreme end.

It doesn't mean people should stop investing, just invest a bit more defensively. Try to avoid investing in stocks that are trading near or recently broke their 52-week high. Unless of course there is a very good reason to do so. For example, AGNC (to reference my above post) is trading near it's 52-week high, but the $5 annual dividend helps soften any blows the stock may take in a correction and if held until 2014 that should give plenty of time for the stock to recover will still receiving the $5 annual ($1.25 quarterly) dividends.

While INTC does pay a dividend, I would not be a buyer at it's current price of $26.87. I think $25 is a more reasonable price which means the dividend rate will be slightly better, but more importantly if/when a correction occurs, the price will not drop as much compared to buying it at it's current price.

There's not much news that would push the stock price higher or lower.
a c 473 à CPUs
a c 119 À AMD
August 12, 2012 5:26:23 PM

dogman_1234 said:
Okay. How does one convince the BoD to hire you?


You do not approach the BoD. The BoD approaches you.

It's all based on which individuals have the solid career background that outshines most of their peers based on the criteria for the job as CEO. Are they looking for someone who can change the course of a struggling company? Help improve inefficiencies and change the company's public image? Someone to just make sure the company continues on it's present course, but be effective enough to manage bumps in the road to keep the company growing and earning more revenues?
a c 78 à CPUs
August 12, 2012 5:28:59 PM

Heh, after being laid off so long, I had to fight tooth and nail to find a minimum wage job with reasonable hours that wouldn't be a pay cut from my unemployment. What other jobs are out there that come looking for you and not the other way around? :lol: 
a c 473 à CPUs
a c 119 À AMD
August 12, 2012 5:47:55 PM

dogman_1234 said:
What about bonds? Muni, corp, and federal?


Sorry, I don't invest in bonds directly. The interest rate is too low for my taste, I'd rather keep my money in the bank to get the whopping 0.25% interest (or whatever it is right now). You should probably look into a mutual fund for that.

The most conservative mutual I own is Permanent Portfolio (ticker PRPFX). It have a very good track record and is pretty tax efficient. It's considered to be a flexible portfolio and the object is to not only preserve your money, but also grow it. Due to it's conservative nature it may not grow as fast as a growth mutual fund, but it performs better than a bond fund.

Quote:
The Fund seeks to preserve and increase long-term purchasing power value by investing fixed percentages in gold, silver, Swiss Franc assets, stocks of real estate and natural resource companies, aggressive growth stocks, and US Treasury securities.


http://www.smartmoney.com/quote/PRPFX/


I am considering moving some of my money from growth mutual funds that have not been performing well into the Vanguard Dividend & Growth Fund (VDIGX).

http://www.smartmoney.com/quote/VDIGX/?symbol=VDIGX
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 9:45:41 PM

nekulturny said:
Heh, after being laid off so long, I had to fight tooth and nail to find a minimum wage job with reasonable hours that wouldn't be a pay cut from my unemployment. What other jobs are out there that come looking for you and not the other way around? :lol: 

If you have a Ph.D, moderate intelligence, and good discipline in learning...any university would ask you to work for them.
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 9:48:35 PM

jaguarskx said:
In general, I would be wary of the current state of the US economy (high unemployment and layoffs are still coming) and the turmoil going on in Europe. Things are going to get worse in Europe before they get better.

I do not see any justification for the current trend in the stock market. I think people are currently investing into the stock market because they don't want to "miss the ride". I think the ride is going to come to an end. I would estimate that the DOW will probably reach a peak of around 13,500 before the market starts to slowly correct itself... a correction of probably 10% or 15% on the extreme end.

It doesn't mean people should stop investing, just invest a bit more defensively. Try to avoid investing in stocks that are trading near or recently broke their 52-week high. Unless of course there is a very good reason to do so. For example, AGNC (to reference my above post) is trading near it's 52-week high, but the $5 annual dividend helps soften any blows the stock may take in a correction and if held until 2014 that should give plenty of time for the stock to recover will still receiving the $5 annual ($1.25 quarterly) dividends.

While INTC does pay a dividend, I would not be a buyer at it's current price of $26.87. I think $25 is a more reasonable price which means the dividend rate will be slightly better, but more importantly if/when a correction occurs, the price will not drop as much compared to buying it at it's current price.

There's not much news that would push the stock price higher or lower.

In layman's term: wait until after the US election, and see where Europe and east Asia are economically?
a c 473 à CPUs
a c 119 À AMD
August 12, 2012 10:11:00 PM

Well... waiting for the US election is a generally a good idea since I believe 9 out of the past 11 times after the election the US stock market went up because that least there is some economic direction for the country whether good or bad.

Europe and Asia will need several years to recover so waiting for them is pointless. Just avoid investing in Europe or Asia for the time being. If you are going to do so, then use a mutual fund for that, but invest a small amount. I prefer Asia over Europe at this point in time.

Timing the market is very difficult to do. Even professional traders cannot do it consistantly. The best thing to do is to research stocks that interest you and see if there is room for the stock to increase in value even for the short term. Investing in stocks that pays a dividend can help ease the pain of a market crash as long as you hold on to it long even to recover and while you are waiting for the stock to recover you will be earning dividends.

For example, I purchased Pfizer (PFE) back in 2007 at $19+ per share and it was paying around a $1.76 annual dividend. I believe the dividend yield was approx 8% at that point in time. Unfortunately, I did not keep track of the stock so I missed the news that they were acquiring another company, but they were going to cut the dividend in half in order to do the deal. Naturally the stock tanked. I decided to hold onto it though so that I can sell it for the same price I bought it at so at least I won't take a loss. Then the market crashed in 2008 and PFE dropped as low as $12 per share. I should have purchased more shares, but I was investing in other stocks at the time and like most people I was kinda scared to invest too much in the market especially in a stock where I'm already in the hole. I sold PFE last week when the stock was at $23.50 or so. I made money on PFE, but not as much as I hoped and at least the dividend gave me some comfort as I waited for the stock price to recover.
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 10:14:03 PM

I'm worried about AMD GPUs. I could care less about their CPUs though I do like their Fusion based products a heck of a lot.
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 10:18:28 PM

I was thinking of TI. What about Texas Instruments?
a c 473 à CPUs
a c 119 À AMD
August 12, 2012 10:22:55 PM

I am keeping my eye on Altria Group (MO) since they have a pretty good dividend yield, but the stock price is too high for my taste. It's trading at $35 right now and pays an annual dividend of $1.64 (4.69%).

Altria is the holding company for Philip Morris International (PM). Just in case you are not aware Philip Morris manufactures cigarettes. This is another defensive investment I am looking at but I'm not a buyer at this price point. I'm looking to buy in at $31 and every time it drops $1 I'll buy another 100 shares; probably max out at 500 shares if necessary. The strike price I would be looking to sell the stock at is $35 based on current conditions. MO is a pretty stable company with good cash flow so it might not hit the $31 mark until sometime next year.
a c 473 à CPUs
a c 119 À AMD
August 12, 2012 10:37:53 PM

dogman_1234 said:
I was thinking of TI. What about Texas Instruments?


Texas Instruments (TXN) seems to be trading at a fair price right now. I imagine that the potential for the stock price to increase is greater than the potential to decrease... barring a market correction.

TXN is in a good position because it's semiconductor products is used in a wide variety of electronics from smartphones to tablets to microcontrollers in low power embedded systems. They have a product called OMAP (I can't recall what it stands for), which are used in said smartphones and tablets, but OMAP is not ubiquitous in those devices. OMAPs are "SoC" System on Chip based on an ARM core design. Other companies manufacture SoC like Qualcomm and nVidia and there's nothing that differentiates TXN's SoCs from the competition.

I you are eying TXN as a long term investment, then I think will do fine. But I think there are better companies to invest in than TXN at the moment.
a c 473 à CPUs
a c 119 À AMD
August 12, 2012 11:00:39 PM

ElMoIsEviL said:
I'm worried about AMD GPUs. I could care less about their CPUs though I do like their Fusion based products a heck of a lot.


I'm waiting on the Radeon HD 8xxx and GTX 7xx series for my next potential upgrade when Haswell is released. The Radeon HD series have most of the time seems to have a good balance between price/performance/power consumption. However, I believe nVidia has caught up with the GTX 6xx series.

I'll just wait and see...
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 11:17:27 PM

jaguarskx said:
Texas Instruments (TXN) seems to be trading at a fair price right now. I imagine that the potential for the stock price to increase is greater than the potential to decrease... barring a market correction.

TXN is in a good position because it's semiconductor products is used in a wide variety of electronics from smartphones to tablets to microcontrollers in low power embedded systems. They have a product called OMAP (I can't recall what it stands for), which are used in said smartphones and tablets, but OMAP is not ubiquitous in those devices. OMAPs are "SoC" System on Chip based on an ARM core design. Other companies manufacture SoC like Qualcomm and nVidia and there's nothing that differentiates TXN's SoCs from the competition.

I you are eying TXN as a long term investment, then I think will do fine. But I think there are better companies to invest in than TXN at the moment.

TNX for a long term...even during recessions as markets seem to correct themselves over the short term; ie. 5-10 years.

What other semiconductor companies like TI or not do you recommend? I am looking for a long term investment with moderate growth, low to medium risk, and one that I can start with for future retirement to compliment other options.
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2012 11:17:47 PM

jaguarskx said:
I'm waiting on the Radeon HD 8xxx and GTX 7xx series for my next potential upgrade when Haswell is released. The Radeon HD series have most of the time seems to have a good balance between price/performance/power consumption. However, I believe nVidia has caught up with the GTX 6xx series.

I'll just wait and see...

The 8XXX series by AMD should compliment their Trinity release, which is to come Q3.
7XX series by nVIDIA should also compliment, but I would like to see them invest higher in workstation and server friendly units and SoC's.
a c 473 à CPUs
a c 119 À AMD
August 12, 2012 11:39:40 PM

I don't actually invest in any semiconductor companies they are a bit too cyclical for me for a long term investment. The closet would telecommunication like Verizon (VZ) and CenturyLink (CTL). Those are long term investments for me even though I think I should sell my VZ shares soon.

For real long term I am looking at Lockheed Martin (LMT) just looking for it to pull back to $80 or so. They are basically the premier defense contractor (some civilian applications too) and I am definitely long on their stock. It's actually a good stock to enroll in DRIP (Dividend Re-Investment Program). I am also long United Technology which another aerospace company but not full dependent on military contracts. I hold a large position and is basically the only company that I have enrolled in DRIP so far.

To backtrack, Verizon (VZ) and AT&T (T) are good long term investments, but I would wait for a pullback before investing in them. The telecomm business is highly regulated and there is also a high price to pay for a company to get into that industry since you need to buy bandwidth from the gov't and set up towers amongst other things. So competition is very limited. Either on should be fine to invest in right now, but I would like to see ATT @ $32 and Verizon @ $35 before jumping in.

Consumer products are good for long term investments because no matter which way the economy turns you need basic necessities. While not a necessity I am invested in Coco-Cola (KO), they keep finding ways to expand their product lines and even if the economy tanks people will be drinking Coke. McDonald's (MCD) is a potential long term investment as well since it is a recognized brand. Proctor & Gamble (PG) is also good as well. In the long term any of these three companies should build up your nest egg. You can even enroll them in DRIP if you want your dividend to buy additional shares.

Well, gotta get going... a family dinner awaits...
a c 146 à CPUs
a b À AMD
August 13, 2012 12:35:20 AM

Why not whats wrong with Apple, Samsung and Intel. As long as they keep making improvements their stock stays steady or goes up.
a c 78 à CPUs
August 13, 2012 1:28:27 AM

dogman_1234 said:
If you have a Ph.D, moderate intelligence, and good discipline in learning...any university would ask you to work for them.

Well, I'm about 2/3s done with an associates degree, tested with an I.Q. of 147 when I was 8 years old, although its debatable how accurate that is, a doctor also told my mom when I was 6 that I'd grow up to be 6'5. I barely made it to 6'. As far as learning discipline. I'm back in college merely as a necessity in this economy, nobody is hiring for what I have a strong resume in (Logistics and Distribution). :lol: 
a c 473 à CPUs
a c 119 À AMD
August 13, 2012 1:57:35 AM

rds1220 said:
Why not whats wrong with Apple, Samsung and Intel. As long as they keep making improvements their stock stays steady or goes up.


I already think Apple is overvalued at this time in my opinion. I'm not really interested in Apple (AAPL) unless it goes down to around $450. Maybe I'll look at it again when after a market correct if I have the money to buy some shares. I don't really follow Samsung.

Intel (INTC) is okay, but I prefer to trade that stock rather than own it for the long term. Yeah sure, it has a decent 3.33% dividend right now, and it's better than keeping your money in the bank, I dunno about holding it long term beyond 1 year. Like I said, I think I rather trade it than hold it and I don't think I would buy it unless I see that the stock price can go up another 30%. So I'll sit on the side lines until the price drops to something like $22 before I'll consider looking at it. Assuming I have the money to invest.
!