Benchmarks and Overclocking vs Winning

I really have to ask this question, since I've been piddling with puters since Dos 6 and Windows 3.11 were still being sold on the shelf. What is with all the hype of the need to overclock and all the concern over benchmarks ? I am sincerely convinced that people are overclocking and/or upgrading to an unnecessary cpu just because they don't like their "standing" on the benchmark scale. I've been playing high graphics games for many years now and they always run smooth. Anything from MMORG's to offline FPS games, I don't see much of a difference in game play between my AMD Athlon dual core and my Phenom II x6 1090t. The only time I saw a difference is when my Athlon puter had only a 128 meg vid card in it, but after I upgraded it, the game play went as smooth as the phenom puter. I've always built my own puters. I generally keep 4 puters on my desk for multi-boxing in some online mmorgs, so when one gets old form age, I throw it out and build another one.
But I have never overclocked and never worried about looking at benchmarks, when building a puter. I just play games and enjoy myself. I would rather be competitive in a game, than spend my time being competitive on a benchmark scale. Benchmarks and overclocking will not help me win the games I play.
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  1. Depends...

    Not everything revolves around games. I encode videos and the reason I plan to upgrade it to improve performance (i.e. decrease the total amount of time it takes to complete an encode).

    Currently when I encode a 1920x1080 movie using Handbrake and the x.264 codec I get on average about 9 frames per second based on the settings I am using. I am also using the 2-pass method to get better video quality.

    A two hour movie has 172,800 frames (NTSC). Encoding at an average of 9 frames per second with the 2-pass method means it will take 10.667 hours to completely encode a two hour movie with my Q9450.
  2. Also buying a fast/powerful CPU can mean that you can postpone your next upgrade to a later time. The Q9450 was considered pretty powerful when it 1st came out and overclocking it makes it even more powerful.

    While a Q9450 with stock speed is only as good as a Phenom II X4 955 nowadays, it is still good enough for me so that I can wait for Haswell to be released before upgrading again.
  3. The majority of the "benchmarks and overclocking" posts I have read, were usually about games. Most videos that I watch, or processing pics with Photoshop (I'm a photographer), or Using MS Office 2010, its a matter of how patient someone is. I don't need to click on any app and have it open in a split second or have it process/save a file any faster than it does on the Athlon dual core where all of my general use apps are running. I recently had a friend come over with his I7 box, bragging about the 10,000 plus rating on benchmark performance. He played a couple of the same games I played. I tried his puter out with one of those games and didn't see any difference in game play than on my phenom x6 puter. So not sure what others are seeing.

    jaguarskx said:
    Depends...

    Not everything revolves around games. I encode videos and the reason I plan to upgrade it to improve performance (i.e. decrease the total amount of time it takes to complete an encode).
  4. Compucook said:
    I don't need to click on any app and have it open in a split second or have it process/save a file any faster than it does on the Athlon dual core where all of my general use apps are running.


    Nowadays, it's more dependent on the speed of the hard drive. For the really impatient people they install a SSD in their PC. I'll hold off on SSD's until the capacity increase to 1TB and the cost per GB is only 50% more than a 7200RPM hard drive... if I have the money to buy one.

    As for games... some people just like bragging rights. But some games are more CPU dependent than GPU dependent like FSX so there can be times when a fast CPU is necessary for games.

    As I mentioned before, some people just buy the best CPU they can afford so that they can postpone their next CPU upgrade. My Q9450 will be 5 years when I upgrade to Haswell... or 6 years old if I choose to wait for Broadwell in 2014.
  5. A Pentium 4 with an SSD will bootup and open up programs faster than an i7 with a 5400RPM hard drive.


    It's kinda screwy now days :/
  6. both are right.
    There are a lot of people who are just doing this as a hobby and want to Win and show off for no real purpose. You can make an analogy of people fiddling with their cars-especially all the appearance modifications that have no practical purpose.

    But there are some few people where they actually are using their computer's processing power
  7. There's a big difference between playing a game at 6-10fps and playing it at at least 25+ fps.

    There's also a difference between playing a game at a crap resolution and/or having to tune down all visuals.

    Hardware helps with that. And sometimes it's not just all about the CPU.


    Also, as some already mentioned, there's not just games. Working on CAD Software that renders and animates several complex objects, including their physics while interacting in real time, isn't productive (if working) at all, with a crap machine. You need the latest hardware for such purposes. Software evolves and becomes more demanding.
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