Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Custom Laptop-style case and stuffs

Last response: in Components
Share
August 14, 2012 10:34:46 PM

The other day, I had an idea for a custom computer case. I was thinking that I could use Polycarbonate (http://goo.gl/DXSSO), cut the polycarbonate to a size comparable to a 15.6" laptop display, and then also make another piece to actually put the laptop display in (http://goo.gl/ycBBA). Here are a few questions I would like to get answers to:

- Would polycarbonate be strong enough to support standard computer parts (for example the motherboard and dvd drive)? If not, then please tell me another material I could customize myself so that I could properly fit the parts. :) 

- What's the best way to keep the enclosure pieces together?

Here's the list of parts I was going to put in it: http://goo.gl/B2Jg2

Also, here's a picture I drew just to help people out: http://tinypic.com/r/4jsz78/6

Thanks in advance. :D 
a b ) Power supply
August 14, 2012 10:42:12 PM

Screws are best, clips are annoying as they always break, blue tack i'm not sure, superglue maybe...


Most laptops are made out of kind of weak plastic (not sure which though) but polycarbonate should be alright...
m
0
l
August 14, 2012 11:17:35 PM

jay_nar2012 said:
Screws are best, clips are annoying as they always break, blue tack i'm not sure, superglue maybe...


Most laptops are made out of kind of weak plastic (not sure which though) but polycarbonate should be alright...

Hmm, I know that my macbook, the early 2008 one, is made out of polycarbonate, but there's something like aluminum on the inside supporting it (I saw something like that inside it when I replaced some parts). Maybe I could use some sort of metal strips and corners? Dunno. :) 
m
0
l
Related resources
a b ) Power supply
August 14, 2012 11:22:40 PM

How about shaping the mobo in the plastic then putting the top layer on top then somehow find a way to hold the screen hinges down (light metal layer covering base).
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
August 14, 2012 11:23:05 PM

BlueAndGray said:
but there's something like aluminum on the inside supporting it

Some laptops from Apple and a few other manufacturers had a magnesium alloys a few years ago but if they are still using them, they haven't been as noisy about it as they used to for a while.
m
0
l
August 14, 2012 11:53:59 PM

jay_nar2012 said:
How about shaping the mobo in the plastic then putting the top layer on top then somehow find a way to hold the screen hinges down (light metal layer covering base).

You said to have a light metal layer cover the base; which part do you mean by base?
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
August 14, 2012 11:56:56 PM

The bit were the keyboard and ports and mobo is....
m
0
l
August 15, 2012 12:01:50 AM

InvalidError said:
Some laptops from Apple and a few other manufacturers had a magnesium alloys a few years ago but if they are still using them, they haven't been as noisy about it as they used to for a while.

Would aluminum work as an internal support though? Because as I recall, some of the few macbooks after the one I have were made out of aluminum, but the current ones are made out of polycarbonate, again, but with unibody design.
m
0
l
August 15, 2012 12:03:13 AM

jay_nar2012 said:
The bit were the keyboard and ports and mobo is....

Ah, I see what you mean. I suppose I could do that. :) 
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
August 15, 2012 12:07:19 AM

How about the cooling system?
m
0
l
August 15, 2012 12:11:53 AM

jay_nar2012 said:
How about the cooling system?

In the picture and list I provided, there's Intel's HTS1155LP; I could make some sort of vent like most laptops do, from the cooler's direction in which the blower blows and to outside. What should I make the vent out of? Polycarbonate or aluminum?
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
August 15, 2012 12:20:54 AM

Aluminum probably, you need to make vents from the heatsink or fan to one side and make intake vents somewhere.
m
0
l
August 15, 2012 12:28:57 AM

jay_nar2012 said:
Aluminum probably, you need to make vents from the heatsink or fan to one side and make intake vents somewhere.

Okay then, thanks. :)  Don't know if I am actually gonna do this build... lol :p 
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
August 15, 2012 12:35:59 AM

You could just get a cardboard box and paint it....

(i thought you were making a laptop LOL).

You can use both polycarbonate and aluminum, measure 2 large squares (for side panels) and 4 rectangles for the back bottom front and top...
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
a c 249 D Laptop
August 15, 2012 12:41:42 AM

Hi :) 

I own a Laptop repair company...

You have got to be kidding right ???

You are reinventing the wheel...

A laptop casing is EXTREMELY complicated for very good reasons, strength, cooling, wireless reception/transmission...shock resistance, etc,etc, etc

If you did this it would take a LOT of time...way over 50 hours at a guess, and more importantly, it wont work properly when finished....

Just buy a Laptop, a lot easier.... and that WILL work properly....

All the best Brett :) 
m
0
l
August 15, 2012 1:39:32 AM

Somehow, I just felt like making my own chassis for it and stuff... lol it'll prob be expensive though.
m
0
l
August 16, 2012 11:26:13 PM

Also, I want to know if I could put an external battery inside it; I found one, but it's the type that acts like an AC adapter and has an AC adapter cord. The DQ77KB has an internal 19v connector on it for a 2-pin molex connector, so would I be able to strip off the insulation on the battery's cord and put the + and - cords inside the insulation into the molex connector? The molex connector I am talking about is this: http://goo.gl/e2bem
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
August 17, 2012 4:50:01 PM

BlueAndGray said:
Would aluminum work as an internal support though?

There is no reason why it it shouldn't. Like any other material, some stiffening structures will be required.

A flat sheet of paper cannot bear its own weight but if you roll it into a tube, it can support thousands of times its own weight.

Another example is cheap IKEA furniture: extremely flimsy/weak until you nail the cardboard backing which prevents parallelogram deformation. Once the backing is in place though, it feels surprisingly sturdy for as long as nails will hold.

Stiffness is every bit as much about the materials as it is about the structure. You can make surprisingly strong structures out of relatively flimsy materials with creative use of structures.
m
0
l
August 17, 2012 6:31:21 PM

InvalidError said:
There is no reason why it it shouldn't. Like any other material, some stiffening structures will be required.

A flat sheet of paper cannot bear its own weight but if you roll it into a tube, it can support thousands of times its own weight.

Another example is cheap IKEA furniture: extremely flimsy/weak until you nail the cardboard backing which prevents parallelogram deformation. Once the backing is in place though, it feels surprisingly sturdy for as long as nails will hold.

Stiffness is every bit as much about the materials as it is about the structure. You can make surprisingly strong structures out of relatively flimsy materials with creative use of structures.

Hmm... I suppose I could somehow get aluminum corners with screw holes in them in each corner of the chassis; I could also add some aluminum strips along the side of the chassis on the inside. :) 

EDIT: By aluminum strips I was sort of talking about these here: http://goo.gl/XwsSb Would those work as a good internal structure?
m
0
l
!