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Some 101, please, about LCD vs. viewfinders

Last response: in Digital Camera
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Anonymous
June 29, 2005 2:54:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

My main camera is an Olympus C-720, which has an EVF. For a lot of
reasons - visibility in bright light, powerful zoom but no image
stabilization being the main ones - I much prefer to use the viewfinder,
vs. taking a picture using the lcd.

I was at a party this past weekend though, and the hosts, who have a new
Kodak camera (not sure which, but it's 4 megapixels and has
user-adjustable P/A/S modes), asked me to take some pictures. I quickly
discovered that, if I zoomed and framed the picture perfectly in the
viewfinder (not an EVF I don't think), the actual shot included a lot of
extras not shown in the EVF. So I resignedly started using the LCD to
frame the picture, trading decent framing for the sharpness I'd have
holding the camera more closely to my body.

My questions:

1. *IS* one thing (viewfinder vs. LCD) supposed to be better than the
other for taking pictures?

2. Am I missing something, or is it really hard to get good candid or
action shots with little blurring by using the LCD? If I'm missing
something, what is it I'm supposed to do to minimize the camera shake?

More about : 101 lcd viewfinders

Anonymous
June 29, 2005 2:54:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Tue, 28 Jun 2005 22:54:43 GMT, TommyC wrote:

> 1. *IS* one thing (viewfinder vs. LCD) supposed to be better than the
> other for taking pictures?

Most people find that they can hold the camera steadier if the
viewfinder is used instead of the LCD. On the other hand, cameras
that have LCDs that can be raised/lowered/swiveled make it much
easier to take some shots that would be difficult or nearly
impossible if the viewfinder had to be used.

> 2. Am I missing something, or is it really hard to get good candid or
> action shots with little blurring by using the LCD? If I'm missing
> something, what is it I'm supposed to do to minimize the camera shake?

Action shots and candids (that depend on split-second timing) can
be easily missed if the LCD doesn't have a fast response time. With
cameras that don't have speedy displays, by the time you see it,
it's probably too late to take the picture. I suppose you can
compensate for that by looking (mainly) directly at the subject,
only occasionally looking at the LCD to make sure the camera is
positioned properly. I sometimes do that even when using a
viewfinder.

You can minimize camera shake when using the LCD by learning to
consistently use a more stable technique, such as keeping your
elbows together, braced against your torso. Much better than
extending your arms straight out. Finding some means of support
also helps. I don't know how well it works, but I've seen ads for a
gadget that is essentially a long cord. One end has a piece that
screws into your camera's tripod socket and the other end either
wraps around your shoe or you step on it. By keeping the cord taut,
it supposedly acts as an inverted monopod. Some of the newer small
P&S cameras that have large LCDs (and no viewfinder) have built-in
image stabilizers, which should help quite a bit too.
!