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Should I start building w/out GPU?

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May 2, 2012 5:51:26 PM

So I ordered all the parts for my computer very early Monday morning, and most of them will be here by the end of today. The only part that will take a little more time is the GPU, which will arrive on Friday.

I'm really excited about getting started. Is there any reason I should not start putting my computer together before my GPU is delivered? I don't have a lot of experience building computers, but I have been doing my research, and I am a quick learner.

Will building (and running) my computer without the GPU affect:

1. Overclocking the CPU?
2. Optimizing the setup of my SSD?
3. Anything else, for any reason?

Despite my excitement, I am more than willing to wait until Friday if anyone can give me an even decent reason to do so. Thank you all in advance!

Here's what I bought:

Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 Mid tower case
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 LGA
CPU: Intel Core i5 2500K
GPU: ASUS HD7870-DC2-2GD5 Radeon 2GB DDR5
PSU: OZC 750W modular bronze rated
RAM: Corsair Vengeance Low Profile 8 GB PC3-12800 1600mhz
SSD: Crucial 128 GB m4 2.5-Inch Solid State Drive SATA 6Gb/s CT128M4SSD2
CPU Cooler: Coolermaster 212 EVO
DVD: LG 22x DVD±RW Super Multi Dual Layer Burner
OS: Windows 7 Home Premium - 64 bit

More about : start building gpu

May 2, 2012 6:13:20 PM

as long as you have on board video the only issue i could se is the heat sink blocking a video card do to it size or the size of the video card. just rember to turn off the power on the power supply and let the power drain out of the system before you put the new video card in. when i do a build that has on board i use it for a day or so when i check that the cpu temps are fine. then i update the bios and any other firmware for drivers or ssd. then i install windows then run prime95 or memtest to see that the parts are fine. with video cards they eather work or they dont. just rember before you power off the pc and place the new video card to change the onboard video setting in bios to use the new pci video card as first video device.
May 2, 2012 6:16:52 PM

Yes, you can start building without the GPU, its one of the last things to go in anyway. Also, if you plan on using Virtu, I think you have to install the software for it before you install the GPU.
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May 2, 2012 6:25:34 PM

smorizio said:
as long as you have on board video the only issue i could se is the heat sink blocking a video card do to it size or the size of the video card. just rember to turn off the power on the power supply and let the power drain out of the system before you put the new video card in. when i do a build that has on board i use it for a day or so when i check that the cpu temps are fine. then i update the bios and any other firmware for drivers or ssd. then i install windows then run prime95 or memtest to see that the parts are fine. with video cards they eather work or they dont. just rember before you power off the pc and place the new video card to change the onboard video setting in bios to use the new pci video card as first video device.


Thank you for reminding me to change the bios. I honestly may have forgotten :) 
May 2, 2012 6:26:24 PM

akopp21 said:
Yes, you can start building without the GPU, its one of the last things to go in anyway. Also, if you plan on using Virtu, I think you have to install the software for it before you install the GPU.


Thank you! Pardon my ignorance, but what is Virtu?
May 2, 2012 6:35:39 PM

virtu it's something that eat up to 20% of your gaming performance in exchange of an imaginary power saving. tested by me...
May 2, 2012 6:35:59 PM

Components in order of installation:

1. Chassis/Case (Of Course)
2. Power Supply
3. Motherboard
4. HDD/SSD
5. DVD/CD/Floppy Drive
6. RAM
7. CPU
8. GPU

Installing these in any other order can result in utter frustration with the wiring or installation of other components (Such as the motherboard before the power supply).
May 2, 2012 6:55:03 PM

Virtu allows you to use the integrated GPU for certain programs and the discrete GPU for others. If you are just using the computer for gaming and general use you don't need it. If you do video editing it might be useful depending on the software you are using.
May 2, 2012 7:15:21 PM

iRS said:
virtu it's something that eat up to 20% of your gaming performance in exchange of an imaginary power saving. tested by me...


:lol: 
May 2, 2012 7:16:20 PM

akopp21 said:
Virtu allows you to use the integrated GPU for certain programs and the discrete GPU for others. If you are just using the computer for gaming and general use you don't need it. If you do video editing it might be useful depending on the software you are using.


Ah, thank you. Yeah, I will not be doing any video editing... no wonder I had not heard of it!
May 2, 2012 7:27:09 PM

Northwestern said:
Components in order of installation:

1. Chassis/Case (Of Course)
2. Power Supply
3. Motherboard
4. HDD/SSD
5. DVD/CD/Floppy Drive
6. RAM
7. CPU
8. GPU

Installing these in any other order can result in utter frustration with the wiring or installation of other components (Such as the motherboard before the power supply).


I read this installation guide here at Tom's Hardware, and it seems to differ a bit from your suggestions. Here's a quick summary of what it says, cut from the article:

Step One: Choosing your components:
Step Two: Prepare your case:
Step Three: Install components on motherboard (outside of case):
Step Four: Install Motherboard into case:
Step Five: Connect System Wires:
Step Six: Install Video Card(s):
Step Seven: Connect Power Supply:
Step Eight: Boot System for First Time:
Step Nine: Install Operating System / Drivers:
Step Ten: Test System and Have FUN!!

Step Two here includes installing the PSU in the case and planning cable layout.

I have noticed quite a few videos that showed builders doing Step Three in the manner this guide suggests, including installing the CPU, CPU-cooler, and RAM on the motherboard before installing the motherboard in the case.

Anyways... sorry for the long response, but I am wondering if you would be willing to explain why your assembly order is different? What benefits will result from it.

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May 2, 2012 7:50:18 PM
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The main benefit to assembling the motherboard, CPU, and RAM outside the case is that you can test that it works before you go through all of the work of putting it in the case. And if it suddenly stops working once in the case, you probably have the case touching something it shouldn't and shorting out the system.
May 9, 2012 9:06:57 AM

Best answer selected by puddlegoo.
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