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I5-2500k worth it?

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August 16, 2012 5:00:58 PM

Sup guys. I've got two questions.

The i5-3570k is unlockable right? Is it worth getting over the i5-2500k?

Also, I have a junky motherboard right now, an Asus P8H61-M LE. What's a better motherboard you guys recommend to go along with the 3570k or the 2500k, if you guys think it's worth it over the 3570k... they're about the same price though, and supposedly the 3570k gets a 10% performance increase, so I don't see why the 2500k would be better.. but... yeah.

For the motherboard, dual PCI slots would be nice because as soon as my xbox 360 craps out, im switching over to PC for good. It's not if lol, it's when.

More about : 2500k worth

August 16, 2012 5:29:50 PM

Well, there are a few differences between the 2500K and 3570K

The difference between the i5 2500K, and 3570K, the 2500K is based on the older Sandy Bridge architecture which is slighty hotter at stock speeds, uses slightly more power, and is slightly slower per clock. The 3570K is based on the newer Ivy Bridge architecture which is slightly cooler at stock speeds, uses less power and faster per clock (5% - 15% faster per MHz). However the Sandy Bridge chips are better overclockers.

The Sandy Bridge chips all support a maximum of PCI-E 2.1, whereas Ivy Bridge chips support PCI-E 3.0, as long as the motherboard has PCI-E 3.0 slots. There really isn't any kind of major performance difference between the 2.1 or 3.0 yet, but maybe by the time there's Radeon HD 9990s and GTX 890s it might matter lol.

If you aren't planning on doing much overclocking, but want to leave the option open for later on, get a i5 3570K and Cooler Master Hyper 212+ CPU Cooler. If you really don't want to overclock just get the 3570K and buy a better cooler later on. If you are intent on maximum overclocking, the 2500K is the superior choice.

As far as motherboards, when you say dual PCI slots, you mean PCI-E for Video Cards right? Here's a good mobo http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Hope this helps :) 
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August 16, 2012 5:47:34 PM

Quote:
The i5-3570k is unlockable right? Is it worth getting over the i5-2500k?

My opinion is no. But yes, they're both overclockable via the multiplier. The lower power usage of the 3570K is probably its biggest selling point as of today (barring native USB 3.0, and PCI-E 3.0, which really aren't relevant today). The problem with the lower power consumption is what it translates in terms of your electric bill is, you'll be running your computer 24/7 for at least a year to break even on what the 3570K typically costs in relation to the 2500K.
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August 16, 2012 5:55:14 PM

stant1rm said:
Well, there are a few differences between the 2500K and 3570K

The difference between the i5 2500K, and 3570K, the 2500K is based on the older Sandy Bridge architecture which is slighty hotter at stock speeds, uses slightly more power, and is slightly slower per clock. The 3570K is based on the newer Ivy Bridge architecture which is slightly cooler at stock speeds, uses less power and faster per clock (5% - 15% faster per MHz). However the Sandy Bridge chips are better overclockers.

The Sandy Bridge chips all support a maximum of PCI-E 2.1, whereas Ivy Bridge chips support PCI-E 3.0, as long as the motherboard has PCI-E 3.0 slots. There really isn't any kind of major performance difference between the 2.1 or 3.0 yet, but maybe by the time there's Radeon HD 9990s and GTX 890s it might matter lol.

If you aren't planning on doing much overclocking, but want to leave the option open for later on, get a i5 3570K and Cooler Master Hyper 212+ CPU Cooler. If you really don't want to overclock just get the 3570K and buy a better cooler later on. If you are intent on maximum overclocking, the 2500K is the superior choice.

As far as motherboards, when you say dual PCI slots, you mean PCI-E for Video Cards right? Here's a good mobo http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Hope this helps :) 


Thanks for the reply bro, it definitely does help.

Say I want to skip the whole graphics card thing, and I just want to setup a super fast computer, and use it for heavy computing, programming, and overclocking. Would you suggest I go with a normal Mid-Tower case just for the sole fact that for overclocking I would need sufficient cooling? I really want a nice slim tower kind of setup, but heat issues have me worried since overclocking coems in to play. And if I wasn't to use this rig for gaming at all, and I was just setting it up solely based on computing speed, and to utilize the HyperThreading technology, which processor would you suggest then? Still the 3570k, the 2500k, or something from the i7 series?

And now in the situation I mentioned above, what motherboard would you recommend, since the gaming factor is out.


Here's a case I was looking at.. any suggestions? It still has that small form factor look to it, but allows for a large amount of fans, and if necessary, liquid cooling: http://www.directron.com/fdcaarcminibl.html
August 16, 2012 6:37:03 PM

If you aren't gaming, but are doing programming and CAD work with overclocking, the motherboard I showed was good. For maximum overclocking, a Core i7 2600K is a good choice.

However you might want to try a Socket LGA 2011 Motherboard + CPU. In which case I recommend this motherboard. Specifically because of the case you picked being a minitower case this MicroATX motherboard from ASRock has tons of features, good quality and a decent price.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The Core i7 3820 is very overclockable, and a good jumping off point for the X79 platform. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

And I recommend this video card as a good beginner card for CAD work. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Are you looking to do a simple water-cooling loop or a DIY custom setup?
August 16, 2012 6:57:30 PM

Well tbh, I almost certainly won't be doing any CAD work with this computer at all.

And for purely budgetary purposes, I think I might just go with the i5-2500k, because the i7-2600k is $120 more then the i5. How large a step up in performance is the i7-2600k compared to the i5-2500k when considering overclocking, and will the i5-2500k still be a super fast processor?

And now, since I am going with that case I linked to, what mATX motherboard would you recommend? It has to be LGA 1155 for sure, since I am almost certainly going to go with the i5-2500k. I will be doing overclocking for sure, so I would need a motherboard that would work.

As for the liquid cooling, most likely, if it's necessary, I would go with a simple water-cooling/radiator setup for sure. Nothing too crazy. Still, do you think it would be necessary to use liquid cooling when that case can utilize 7 fans? Haha that's a crazy amount.
August 16, 2012 7:10:14 PM

The Motherboard you picked is fine. For basic overclocking, a Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO is a good choice and well priced. If you want to dabble in water cooling, the Antec Kuhler 620 is a very starting point. Quiet, dependable, and good cooling. If you want a good, well priced gaming card that doesn't draw a lot of power or generate a lot of heat, look at a GTX 670.
August 16, 2012 7:17:22 PM

stant1rm said:
The Motherboard you picked is fine. For basic overclocking, a Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO is a good choice and well priced. If you want to dabble in water cooling, the Antec Kuhler 620 is a very starting point. Quiet, dependable, and good cooling. If you want a good, well priced gaming card that doesn't draw a lot of power or generate a lot of heat, look at a GTX 670.


You're kidding right? GTX 670? That thing is a fortune lolol. Most likely, if I do even bother with graphics cards, it will be something like a cheap 550 Ti, and then maybe I will run an SLI in the future. I'm not exactly too interested in the gaming aspect of this build. I'm really just trying to go for speed and performance.

I'll definitely check out the Antec Kuhler though if I decide to try out water cooling.

Also, the ASRock H77 Mobo I linked to, can I overclock with that mobo? Also, here's a question I didn't ask. My current motherboard, the Asus P8H61-M LE, could I overclock the i5-2500k with that motherboard? I remember someone telling me a while back that I couldn't, but I think they were referring to the i3-2120 which has a locked multiplier. Not sure though..
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August 16, 2012 8:13:39 PM

Quote:
Also, the ASRock H77 Mobo I linked to, can I overclock with that mobo?

No. Intel chipsets with an H or B prefix do not support overclocking. You need a P or Z prefix (like Z77, Z68, Z75, P67, etc)


And yes, i3s have locked multipliers. K at the end of Intel model numbers denote unlocked.


550 TIs are meh for gaming cards, if you want to game (believe me, I'm getting rid of mine soon), put more money into the graphics. You don't have to go as balls to the wall as a GTX 670. But a 7850, 7870 or the new 660 TI would be good options.
August 16, 2012 8:21:35 PM

I think it's always good to have the latest tech given they are at similar price-points. Whats not to love? pcie 3.0, native usb 3, less power, etc.. I give my vote for IB.

I like the Asus mobos, good for overclocking, better looking bios imo, and they pack a good amount of features. The P8Z77-V LK are well priced too.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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August 16, 2012 8:29:16 PM

^ Passmark is junk for benchmarks. Seriously, you broke one of the Cardinal rules of benchmark posting by linking it.
August 16, 2012 9:06:23 PM

odiervr said:
http://www.videocardbenchmark.net/high_end_gpus.html

Benchmark for performance and cost of different GPU's.

z77 & 3570k for overclocking.


You posted a benchmark showing a stock GTX 670 beating a stock GTX 680, and you still think it's credible? Also, 3570K over a 2500K for overclocking? Really?
August 17, 2012 4:23:39 AM

lol, some nice face mashing going on haha, I love it. From what I've read, evidence seems to back up stant1rm in that the i5-2500k is still the best for high overclocking, so I'm still going with that.

550 Ti is out. I don't really care about graphics so much, so I'll just look in to a gpu when the time comes, or money permits. Maybe I'll just wind up buying another 6870.. :p 

Motherboard, still haven't decided, but thank you nekulturny for that little lesson. Will make it easier for me to decide which mATX mobo to get. Much appreciated.
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