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A bigger PSU means saving more on bills?

Last response: in Components
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August 20, 2012 1:15:13 AM

hi all

A lot of friends told me A bigger PSU means saving more on bills.

The reason behind is the PSU will be always under usage, thus lesser heat created on the PSU or CPU


I just got a 650W 80+ gold PSU. and I dont play games, only watch some HD videos


Please comments
Regards
a c 76 ) Power supply
August 20, 2012 1:24:15 AM

Nah, it can actually be the opposite, if you go WAY above and beyond what you need because PSU's are less efficient when they're under 20% load, but a good 80+ Gold PSU is still pretty efficient under 20%, anyway.

Nothing to worry about either way, really, since you got a 80+ Gold PSU. It just won't be more efficient.
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a c 151 ) Power supply
August 20, 2012 1:52:40 AM

The average gaming PC idles at about the same power usage as a 100W light bulb. (incadescent) During heavy gameplay... well, it all depends on what ya got inside the box.
If you're not a gamer, buy the most high-efficient PSU you can afford if kilowatt-hour$ is of major importance.
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Related resources
a b ) Power supply
August 20, 2012 2:06:03 AM

bronze 80+ is around the level where price and efficiency and quality starts to unfold. each certification up increases the lifespan due to less heat being generated from the psu. though the amount of electricity saved is negligible on paying more for a higher certification, unless the computer is on load for most of the day or on 24hr/365days
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Anonymous
August 20, 2012 2:38:03 AM

This makes no sense. Your friends are making unrealistic assumptions based on their own fancy.



If you look up almost any PSU efficiency chart the trend will be that it starts least efficient, increases to be most efficient near moderate-heavy useage, and then tapers off to be somewhat less efficient as it is nearing maximum stress.

Surprise. Designers design PSUs to be used.

It's likely your friends have been tricked into buying expensive PSU units and are trying to justify it.
+1 for the marketing folks.
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a c 158 ) Power supply
August 20, 2012 11:56:02 AM

If you don't have a discrete graphics card in your PC, then a 650W PSU is WAY overkill. A good quality 250-300W PSU would be more than enough for a system using integrated graphics for basic multimedia usage. While it is true that light loads cause less heat to be generated because the PSU does not have to work hard to supply the power, there is a limit to how far that logic goes. A 650W 80+ Gold PSU in a multi-media system without a discrete graphics card runs over Granny while it blows past that limit.
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a b ) Power supply
August 20, 2012 12:05:22 PM

Nope, your friend was wrong and you wasted your money buying that PSU.
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August 20, 2012 2:12:13 PM

oh man, i have already made my purchase. then I think i will need to use lesser computer to save on bills then

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a c 243 ) Power supply
August 20, 2012 2:44:32 PM

dudewitbow said:
bronze 80+ is around the level where price and efficiency and quality starts to unfold. each certification up increases the lifespan due to less heat being generated from the psu. though the amount of electricity saved is negligible on paying more for a higher certification, unless the computer is on load for most of the day or on 24hr/365days

EA650 80+
http://www.plugloadsolutions.com/psu_reports/ANTEC-EA-6...
84.5% at half load

TP650 80+ Bronze
http://www.plugloadsolutions.com/psu_reports/SP696_ANTE...
86.5%

No Silver rated 650 from Antec, if there was one i think by looking at the rest of the numbers we could probably call it 88+% and not be far off

HCP650 80+ Gold
http://www.plugloadsolutions.com/psu_reports/ANTEC%20IN...
90.76%

Ea650 Platinum
http://www.plugloadsolutions.com/psu_reports/ANTEC_EA-6...
92%

1 - 2 % actual difference between each rating amounts to pretty much nothing as far as longevity of the unit is concerned
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August 20, 2012 2:50:53 PM

This makes no sense. Your friends are making unrealistic assumptions based on their own fancy.
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a b ) Power supply
August 20, 2012 2:59:20 PM

delluser1 said:
EA650 80+
http://www.plugloadsolutions.com/psu_reports/ANTEC-EA-6...
84.5% at half load

TP650 80+ Bronze
http://www.plugloadsolutions.com/psu_reports/SP696_ANTE...
86.5%

No Silver rated 650 from Antec, if there was one i think by looking at the rest of the numbers we could probably call it 88+% and not be far off

HCP650 80+ Gold
http://www.plugloadsolutions.com/psu_reports/ANTEC%20IN...
90.76%

Ea650 Platinum
http://www.plugloadsolutions.com/psu_reports/ANTEC_EA-6...
92%

1 - 2 % actual difference between each rating amounts to pretty much nothing as far as longevity of the unit is concerned



hence being negligible past bronze. after bronze, its more or less quality of parts and wattage you are paying for.
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a b ) Power supply
August 20, 2012 3:00:33 PM

Without knowing the workload of the machine (and the hardware itself) it hard to tells..

Most of PSU will work at it best efficiency at 40% - 70% workload, so keeping it constant at those workload will save money on bills...

but it was so small some people will neglect and it not justify to buy pricyer PSU...

In other hand on global scale saving 1W each person multyply with number of computer user can have good impact on global scale (now i'm sound like environtmetalist... :D )

going to better efficiency PSU not a bad thing if u got money to spare (as long as keeping the 50% workload in mind)...
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August 20, 2012 3:02:15 PM

longyagh said:
This makes no sense. Your friends are making unrealistic assumptions based on their own fancy. http://www.forexchartingsoftware.info/iPhone.gif


Actually their friends might have something right in their minds.

You have two ways to get a bigger efficiency and spend less money on electric bill:

1- A higher rating 80Plus PSU are more efficient and have less losses.

2- Usually PSUs have this efficiency curve below. This means that if you use a PSU at 50% load you will get the better efficiency possible.
Is this enough to justify buying a bigger PSU? I don't know, I think the answer is no.

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a c 76 ) Power supply
August 20, 2012 3:04:41 PM

The final word on this should be that a higher wattage PSU isn't the answer, but a more efficient (read 80+ Bronze or better), lower wattage unit is.

Edit: Although, like I alluded to my first reply to this thread, assuming that the PSU in the OP is as efficient as a 80+ Gold unit should be, it still shouldn't be extremely inefficient, even at the low loads it'll be under.
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