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Hyper 212P Cooler Master and Dell435MT motherboard

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August 21, 2012 9:42:41 PM

Hello all,

I have recently purchased the CoolerMaster Hyper 212P CPU cooler. I'm trying to replace my stock CPU cooler that came with my Dell 435mt which now resides in a new Rosewill Challenger case. I'm assuming that fit won't be a problem. After I removed the motherboard, I noticed that the back plate from my stock CPU cooler appears to be rigidly attached (glued on?) to the back of my stock motherboard. The CoolerMaster came with a back plate that they recommend installing. Before I go forcing off the original back plate that seems to be very firmly glued on(?) I wanted to know if I can just use my old CPU cooler back panel without installing the cooler master one? I will attach a picture, just to show what my current one looks like. Thank you very much!
a c 219 à CPUs
a c 180 V Motherboard
August 21, 2012 9:58:39 PM

If it's glued on then I wouldn't try getting it off , if you can install the Hyper 212 with the old back plate then do so , the important thing is if the heatsink can be attached firmly and not move at all.
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August 21, 2012 10:40:50 PM

-This is the older backpanel, it seems to sit very tightly and is firmly attached with something to the mobo. I tried to lift it up gently with a tip of a knife and can't as it seems to be firmly attached (glued on possibly?)
http://desmond.imageshack.us/Himg196/scaled.php?server=...

-The "starshaped" attachments seem to be holding it in place +/- glue(?), and I'm not sure if I can easily lift off the old backplate from the or not. Well gently picking it up, as per previous comment didn't work.
http://desmond.imageshack.us/Himg69/scaled.php?server=6...

-Overall, the older (right) and newer mounts (left) have to be significantly different, since the space between them and back of the motherboard where CPU chip is sitting are significantly different, with the newer backpanel having more airflow between it and the back of the mobo
http://desmond.imageshack.us/Himg211/scaled.php?server=...

-As inzone mentioned if it's glued on, it may not be worth tempering with, but I'm not 100% sure what is holding it in place. Would trying to forcefully removing it and possibly providing better "airflow" to the backplate with the CoolerMaster bracket or is the risk of damaging the motherboard too much? Thanks for your help, again
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a c 219 à CPUs
a c 180 V Motherboard
August 21, 2012 10:51:30 PM

I am going to say it's not woth the risk of removing the plate as it may damage the motherboard.
The thing is that Dell gets to order thier own motherboards from certian otherboard companies because the can order in bulk amounts. By doing this they can also have the motherboard designed to thier specifications and these are boards that you won't see in any store because of this. The plate you show looks similar to what is on most motherboards but in a small sqyare shape and it is part of the board. Because of Dells ordering capabilities they may have a combo design that incorporates the bracket and the usual small square plate into one unit. If this is the case then this bracket cannot be removed without damaging the board.
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a c 219 à CPUs
a c 180 V Motherboard
August 21, 2012 11:01:56 PM





This is the back of a regular motherboard and as you can see it is a square plate like I had said previously and this plate does not come off.
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a c 138 à CPUs
a c 85 V Motherboard
August 21, 2012 11:03:04 PM

If the 212's stand-offs threading is compatible with Dell's plate, you can simply screw the stand-offs into the board and install the HSF normally. You might want to use a cardboard spacer between the standoffs and the PCB so they do not scratch the PCB as you screw them in. This is not a problem with the 212's bracket since the stand-off threads are ground on one side so the flat edge of the backplate slot prevents the stand-offs from turning as nuts get tightened from behind.

If the threads are not compatible, you'll have to either give up or get inventive with a way to get Dell's plate off without breaking the PCB.
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August 21, 2012 11:14:11 PM

The problem may or may not be proprietary parts.

There is a good chance that Dell created a motherboard that will not hold any heatsink except their own. And there is an equally good chance that the heatsink that you took off will not be designed to work with any other motherboard.

Long story short you can try and make it work but dont force things too much or you will just end up ruining good equipment.
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August 21, 2012 11:24:22 PM

InvalidError said:
If the 212's stand-offs threading is compatible with Dell's plate, you can simply screw the stand-offs into the board and install the HSF normally. You might want to use a cardboard spacer between the standoffs and the PCB so they do not scratch the PCB as you screw them in. This is not a problem with the 212's bracket since the stand-off threads are ground on one side so the flat edge of the backplate slot prevents the stand-offs from turning as nuts get tightened from behind.

If the threads are not compatible, you'll have to either give up or get inventive with a way to get Dell's plate off without breaking the PCB.


The stand-offs are too wide, and they will not fit into the "incorporated" DELL CPU cooler backplate. Any suggestions on how I can go about getting appropriate size standoffs? Thanks
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a c 219 à CPUs
a c 180 V Motherboard
August 21, 2012 11:36:41 PM

Because of the differences in a Dell motherboard and regular ones you may have to call Dell's cutomer service and give them you service tag for the computer that you have so they can tell you whether or not you can use that heatsink. One thing to keep in mind is that Dell does not like thier computers overclocked.
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August 21, 2012 11:49:18 PM

It never hurts to ask (by that i mean call dell) but don't be surprised if you run into walls quickly.

time to build your own?
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August 22, 2012 3:37:00 PM

j2j663 said:
It never hurts to ask (by that i mean call dell) but don't be surprised if you run into walls quickly.

time to build your own?


Called Dell this AM, my PC is no longer under warranty, and I was offered to either pay a "small fee" for advanced support, or go online to find "tons of free troubleshooting information". I think for the price of signing up for support, I may as well add a few bucks and upgrade my system to a decent motherboard and CPU.

I found some extra standoffs that were provided with my Rosewill Challenger. It actually fits into the motherboard and the other side accepts the screw that holds the 212P in place. The only difference is that the CoolerMaster standoff (silver) has some insulation lining and appears to be 0.5-1 mm taller, vs the Rosewilll standoff (gold), otherwise everything fits. I think I'm onto something here, if I can just find the appropriate size standoff, the issue will be solved! I'm hesitant to use the short standoff for now, as I'm assuming that the smaller standoff may cause more pressure on the CPU cooling plate. I will venture into the local hardware/PC stores to find the appropriate size, if anyone can tell me where I can find the standoff as tall as the CoolerMaster, but with the screw with a smaller diameter I would greatly appreciate it! Also will the new standoff have to have the "insulation" padding?

BTW nevermind the longer screw on the silver CoolerMaster standoff, as I'm not going to need it that long, since I already have "build in" nonproprietory backplate on my native dell motherboard.

http://img841.imageshack.us/img841/5241/photovff.jpg

THanks!



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a c 219 à CPUs
a c 180 V Motherboard
August 22, 2012 3:44:17 PM

If you spend enough time at the hardware store you can usually find what your looking for. I recently went to my local hardware store to look for a certin specific screw and I was there for about an hour or so and found what I needed.
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August 23, 2012 1:41:19 AM

Most OEM boards are like that, which I found out recently with your exact same problem.

Time for new motherboard for me.
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a c 138 à CPUs
a c 85 V Motherboard
August 23, 2012 6:18:43 AM

dennisdliu said:
Also will the new standoff have to have the "insulation" padding?

Stand-offs rarely come with "pre-applied" washers but computer case kits often include some loose cardboard washers soaked in some form of flame-retardant resin. You will need to find/make your own nylon/cardboard washers.
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August 30, 2012 1:21:23 PM

I figured it out!

After talking to a local PC store owner, he explained the a company will NEVER apply glue to a piece of metal with a large surface area, due to risk of shorting/burning the motherboard. The backplate posterior to the CPU "holding bracket" was attached to the CPU socket with some screws. By undoing the screws and some wiggling, the backplate came off. I was ultimately able to install the CoolerMaster 212H backplate, and everything else that came with the board. The only thing I had to sub for were screws that held the bracket of the CPU chip to the motherboard. Now I have the new cooler installed, and the temps are 10-15C lower under load (50's), which is not ideal, but still a little better then my stock cooler.

Thanks for the replies everyone, if you're interested, I can post the pictures of the things I was talking about!
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January 7, 2013 8:57:17 PM

dennisdliu said:
I figured it out!

After talking to a local PC store owner, he explained the a company will NEVER apply glue to a piece of metal with a large surface area, due to risk of shorting/burning the motherboard. The backplate posterior to the CPU "holding bracket" was attached to the CPU socket with some screws. By undoing the screws and some wiggling, the backplate came off. I was ultimately able to install the CoolerMaster 212H backplate, and everything else that came with the board. The only thing I had to sub for were screws that held the bracket of the CPU chip to the motherboard. Now I have the new cooler installed, and the temps are 10-15C lower under load (50's), which is not ideal, but still a little better then my stock cooler.

Thanks for the replies everyone, if you're interested, I can post the pictures of the things I was talking about!



Yes please post pictures. I am about to do the same thing. I have purchased a new Rosewill Blackhawk case and new PSU. Cooling on the the stock XPS9000/435T case is not good at all. I will also be installing a Cooler Master 212 EVO.

Also interested in the way you attached the CPU socket back onto the motherboard.

Thanks for the help.
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January 24, 2013 7:53:01 PM

TigerJay,

I don't have access to my PC right now, but I plan on getting it back in the next month or so. If I end up getting it earlier, I will def post pics.
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January 24, 2013 8:11:33 PM

I wound up getting it to work. I did have to remove the the sink but did not have to remove any screws from the socket.

I went with a Rosewill Blackhawk Mid Tower case. Rosewill Hive 750 PSU and the Coooler master Hyper 212 Evo.
I took the XPS 9000 motherboard, HDD and AMD 5870 video card from the old machine and put it in the new case.
The Heat sink was close but the door and fan does fit with the heatsink pushing air from front to back. Runs much much cooler and very satisfied.

Got the case for $89.99, PSU for $89.99 and Cooler Master for $29..99 all from newegg.com and all with free shipping. So for around $200 or so I did pretty satisfied and would definitely do it again

I also moved the IO shield, no issues and it snapped right in. Also the connections for the HDD, Power led and switch were the biggest challenge. I found a pinout on the web through some other links and no issues.

If there is anyone else out there considering it because they have a XPS 434T/9000 due to heat issues. Do it.

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January 24, 2013 8:13:52 PM

Meant XPS 435T/9000. iPhone typing is not the best
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January 24, 2013 8:36:42 PM

TigerJay said:
I wound up getting it to work. I did have to remove the the sink but did not have to remove any screws from the socket.

I went with a Rosewill Blackhawk Mid Tower case. Rosewill Hive 750 PSU and the Coooler master Hyper 212 Evo.
I took the XPS 9000 motherboard, HDD and AMD 5870 video card from the old machine and put it in the new case.
The Heat sink was close but the door and fan does fit with the heatsink pushing air from front to back. Runs much much cooler and very satisfied.

Got the case for $89.99, PSU for $89.99 and Cooler Master for $29..99 all from newegg.com and all with free shipping. So for around $200 or so I did pretty satisfied and would definitely do it again

I also moved the IO shield, no issues and it snapped right in. Also the connections for the HDD, Power led and switch were the biggest challenge. I found a pinout on the web through some other links and no issues.

If there is anyone else out there considering it because they have a XPS 434T/9000 due to heat issues. Do it.


Congrats on the successful task completion TigerJay!

I did something very similar. The challenge of swapping the components had me occupied for a few days, but it all worked out. My CPU temps dropped from 60's to 45's C under load (things that for some reason tear through my CPU like Counter Strike Global Offensive). But most importantly the new case allowed me GPU card temps to drop by 30C or so. Again, congrats on the job well done. Hopefully you're being able to put your PC to good stressful use now!
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