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Make A New Computer Or Upgrade Current?

Last response: in Systems
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May 6, 2012 7:08:01 PM

Hey guys, I have a computer right now, but it is a dinosaur.
Specs:
Spoiler
Operating System: Windows XP Home Edition (5.1, Build 2600) Service Pack 3 (2600.xpsp_sp3_gdr.111025-1629)
Language: English (Regional Setting: English)
System Manufacturer: MICRO-STAR INTERNATIONAL CO., LTD
System Model: MS-7253
BIOS: )Phoenix - Award WorkstationBIOS v6.00PG
Processor: AMD Processor model unknown, MMX, 3DNow (2 CPUs), ~2.5GHz
Memory: 2046MB RAM
Page File: 483MB used, 3455MB available
Windows Dir: C:\WINDOWS
DirectX Version: DirectX 9.0c (4.09.0000.0904)
DX Setup Parameters: Not found
DxDiag Version: 5.03.2600.5512 32bit Unicode
Card Name: Radeon HD 4850 not sure about mobo yet.

I am wanting to get a new computer for gaming, but my budget is about 500 bucks, so I wondered if I could get away with upgrading this with expensive hardware (only necessary parts like RAM, Processor, Graphics, Power Supply) and still stay in the 500 dollar range. If I got a new computer it wouldn't be very great considering that my budget is fairly low. So with that being said, here are the things I am thinking about adding to my current computer:

Intel i5-2500k 3.3Ghz Quad Core (BZ80623 For 200 bucks)

Sapphire Radeon HD 6870 (100314-3L) 1GB DDR5 Oxide Express 2.1 x16 (For 177 bucks)

CORSAIR Vengenace 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240Pin DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) (Model: CML8GX3M2A1600C9B for 55 bucks)

Antec EarthWatts Green EA-430D Green 430W Continuous power ATX12V v2.3 / EPS 12V 80 (for 40 bucks)

(If Necessary, Probably Is): ASRock Z75 Pro3 LGA 1155 Intel Z75 HDMI SATA 6GB/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel (for 100 bucks)

If I don't need the motherboard, which I will check soon, I can get away with spending $472. Now I would rather do that than spend 500 on a whole entire new computer, because more than likely the new computer wouldn't be that great. And keeping the hardware I just listed, and adding everything necessary to making a new computer, it would come in at 750 bucks. I have a good feeling the motherboard would be compatible considering that I have been using a Radeon card. So guys, please help me out and maybe, if possible, give me a nice build that can play games such as Battlefield 3, Skyrim, and etc on Ultra/High at maybe 40 fps.


May 6, 2012 7:21:45 PM

Shoot, forgot to mention the monitor resolution, it is an LG Flatron EW224 and I am using 1152x864 resolution.
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May 6, 2012 7:24:40 PM

you will need the new motherboard for this intel cpu your amd board wont take intel cpu
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May 6, 2012 7:36:18 PM

scout_03 said:
you will need the new motherboard for this intel cpu your amd board wont take intel cpu

I knew it was too good to be true :p  I can shell out the extra 100 I suppose, but would everything else be compatible? Or do you know of an AMD processor as good as the Intel one I have chosen so I dont have to pay that extra hundred?
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May 6, 2012 8:08:18 PM

There are no AMD processors as good as the i5-2500k. The motherboard you have is socket AM2, so with a BIOS update it could support AM2+ or AM3 processors (but they won't run as fast as they would on a newer motherboard). If you're trying to save money, there are options, like the Phenom II x4 965 BE ($120), but with a budget of 500-600, I would say this is the time to get a whole new MB/CPU/RAM core. The other parts you have are all compatible, but if you're replacing everything, you won't be able to reuse the Windows license that came with that computer.
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May 6, 2012 8:12:06 PM

scout_03 said:
confirm that is you board http://www.msi.com/product/mb/K9VGM-V.html#/?div=CPUSup... adding you will also need a new psu for hd 6870 this for the requirements http://www.amd.com/us/products/desktop/graphics/amd-rad...

It is saying that 500 watts is recommended, not required. Or is PSU not Power Supply. I am a fail at computer hardware. Anyways here is one that should have enough wattage: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
I really don't want to check the motherboard, but I am pretty sure that is mine, however, I guess I can check. Is there an easy way to check or do I need to dismantle my computer and look?
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May 6, 2012 9:17:56 PM

scout_03 said:
this is the list of that amd got for psu on the hd 6870 http://support.amd.com/us/certified/power-supplies/Page... run this you should get all the specs of your system without opening the case and it's free http://www.hwinfo.com/ choose the 32 if your os is a 32 bits one

I'm having troubles understanding you, is all of my stuff incompatible or are you just recommending that I check out some AMD boards. I don't really want an AMD board and I will spend the money for the ASRock Z75 Mobo. I was just wondering on compatibility, that's really it. I think that my power supply might be a little bit cheap, I saw a few for 45 bucks that were 520 watts. I might get one of those.
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May 6, 2012 9:21:11 PM

erikalikesfire said:
There are no AMD processors as good as the i5-2500k. The motherboard you have is socket AM2, so with a BIOS update it could support AM2+ or AM3 processors (but they won't run as fast as they would on a newer motherboard). If you're trying to save money, there are options, like the Phenom II x4 965 BE ($120), but with a budget of 500-600, I would say this is the time to get a whole new MB/CPU/RAM core. The other parts you have are all compatible, but if you're replacing everything, you won't be able to reuse the Windows license that came with that computer.
Thanks for responding. Do you think I may need a better Power Supply? Sorry I just noticed yours too, I was mostly looking for scout_03 so thats why I must have skipped over yours.
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May 6, 2012 9:24:09 PM

all parts for the intell system you chose are good, but the power supply wont make the graphic card work chose one from the list that amd tell you it will make your card work or you will have to buy another to make the graphic card work
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May 6, 2012 10:11:01 PM

scout_03 said:
all parts for the intell system you chose are good, but the power supply wont make the graphic card work chose one from the list that amd tell you it will make your card work or you will have to buy another to make the graphic card work
Is it not powerful enough or is it that it just isn't compatible? Most of the ones on the AMD list are either out of stock or like 100 bucks. I really don't want to pay that much. I also looked to see if all the stuff was compatible and within the 5 minutes of putting the question up on Yahoo Answers (I know not always reliable) everyone said yeah, but one guy said the supply might not be powerful enough. I might be willing to take the risk of using the power supply.
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Best solution

May 6, 2012 11:51:23 PM

Don't worry about the "recommended power supply list." If you look at the specs of a PSU on newegg, you'll see a line labelled output that says something like

+12V1@18A, +12V2@18A
or
+12V@35A

This may be more information than you can deal with but... Watts = Volts * Amps
The CPU and GPU are the two single largest power guzzlers in a computer, by an overwhelming margin. Both of those parts get all of their power from the 12 volt rail; for this reason quality power supplies get most of their power from the 12V rail, while a cheap PSU might proclaim "500 watts!" while only providing 300 watts on the 12V rail. In the examples above, the first PSU has two 12 volt rails, each capable of delivering 18 amps. The second one has a single rail, which delivers 35 amps.

The HD 6870 only needs like 150 watts (~13 amps), but the box for the HD 6870 says "Requires a 500 watt power supply" because ATI doesn't know if you have a good 400 watt power supply that supplies 28A on the 12V rail, more than enough, or a cheapo PSU that pumped up its wattage for marketing by providing lots of useless power on the 3V and 5V rails.

The i5-2500k and HD 6870 require about 21 amps at max load (without overclocking), and this represents the vast majority of the system's power usage. Therefore, the power supply you chose, which has two rails capable of 18 amps each, is sufficient. I actually like this 450W PSU better because it has better reviews, is 80+ certified (is more efficient and wastes less power) and has a single 12V rail (so you won't have to balance the load yourself when building).
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May 7, 2012 12:36:02 AM

Best answer selected by Taznar.
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May 7, 2012 12:37:56 AM

erikalikesfire said:
Don't worry about the "recommended power supply list." If you look at the specs of a PSU on newegg, you'll see a line labelled output that says something like

+12V1@18A, +12V2@18A
or
+12V@35A

This may be more information than you can deal with but... Watts = Volts * Amps
The CPU and GPU are the two single largest power guzzlers in a computer, by an overwhelming margin. Both of those parts get all of their power from the 12 volt rail; for this reason quality power supplies get most of their power from the 12V rail, while a cheap PSU might proclaim "500 watts!" while only providing 300 watts on the 12V rail. In the examples above, the first PSU has two 12 volt rails, each capable of delivering 18 amps. The second one has a single rail, which delivers 35 amps.

The HD 6870 only needs like 150 watts (~13 amps), but the box for the HD 6870 says "Requires a 500 watt power supply" because ATI doesn't know if you have a good 400 watt power supply that supplies 28A on the 12V rail, more than enough, or a cheapo PSU that pumped up its wattage for marketing by providing lots of useless power on the 3V and 5V rails.

The i5-2500k and HD 6870 require about 21 amps at max load (without overclocking), and this represents the vast majority of the system's power usage. Therefore, the power supply you chose, which has two rails capable of 18 amps each, is sufficient. I actually like this 450W PSU better because it has better reviews, is 80+ certified (is more efficient and wastes less power) and has a single 12V rail (so you won't have to balance the load yourself when building).
Thanks for answering, I was really hoping someone would put that sort of time and effort into the answer. It really helped me out. I actually had a 600w one already chose since I thought that this thread was dead, but now that I saw this you just saved me about 30 bucks. Thank you so much.
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