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Am I Receiving Gigabit speeds?

Last response: in Networking
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May 16, 2011 1:36:31 PM

I'm asking this because me and a friend of mine both bought HP ProLiant Microservers at the same time. We both have the same setup which is PC and Server both connected to a Gigabit switch.

He can receive speeds of over 90MB/s when transferring from PC to Server using default windows file copying. I can get no higher than 35MB/second using Windows file copy or by using TeraCopy.

I have tried copying from different sources ie. Different hard drives in my PC (I have a Seagate 320GB 7200rpm) and from a laptop which has a gigabit port too but still no faster speeds.

We both have the same hard drives within our servers.

I thought it could have been a driver issue on the server however we checked side by side the driver and the advanced configuration of the NIC however still no joy!

I have attached HIS screenshots of the speeds he receives. We also did a netperf test. his throughput is 377.33 while mines is 170 - 177.

According to netperf if the throughput is not what you expect for your type of connection then it's a NIC issue or driver issue or NIC settings issue. But i've tried now from 2 different sources yet still no joy and i've also tried different cables and also direct connection via crossover.

PULLING MY HAIR OUT OVER THIS!



May 16, 2011 2:59:14 PM

keep in mind that its 1000 mega bits.. not mega bytes.. b = bits B- Bytes.

1000 / 8 (8 bits in a byte) = 125 Mega Bytes - that is your max in a Perfect enviroment. Since you dont have this. (router + Authentication + network usage + decaying signal str+ acts of god) 90MB is pretty good.

A real world usage on a network is 75 to 115MB.
May 16, 2011 3:25:21 PM

c911darkwolf said:
keep in mind that its 1000 mega bits.. not mega bytes.. b = bits B- Bytes.

1000 / 8 (8 bits in a byte) = 125 Mega Bytes - that is your max in a Perfect enviroment. Since you dont have this. (router + Authentication + network usage + decaying signal str+ acts of god) 90MB is pretty good.

A real world usage on a network is 75 to 115MB.


hi, not sure if i made it clear. the screenshots are of my friends performance. That is the performance I need to get. I am only on the 35MB/second mark.
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May 17, 2011 7:55:39 PM

Which NICs do you have? Realtek 8111 series seem to be quite popular these days, and often crap out under load. Getting an Intel PCIe NIC could potentially help.

It could also just be protocol or configuration issues. It's hard to say.
May 18, 2011 8:28:08 AM

Ok can you explain your network topology please, namely the type of switch and the grade of cabling being used.

Are you trying to benchmark the connections using Windows SMB (file transfer) from a real HDD to another real HDD? If so please don't do this as there are multiple issues to deal with. First and foremost is that SMB is a TCP protocol that is notorious for being chatty and inefficient. Benchmark using FTP if at all possible. Next is that real spinning HDD's have a limit to their read / write speeds, that limit is way under the 1Gbps limit. A platter HDD will give you 20~50 MBps sustained transfer depending on location of data and platter speed. 1Gbps = 125MBps maximum, honestly you'll be lucky to get 90% of this. My suggestion is to use ImDisk on both the server and the client and transfer the file to and from the RAM Disks. This will remove the HDD as being a bottle neck. My final suggestion is to look at the cabling, not all cables are created equal. Check for loose fitted ends, you might want to repunch the heads to ensure a proper fit. Make sure your cable isn't going near any power lines, definitely not running parallel with them. I see this with OCD guys zip tieing all their cables (including the power) into one single bundle.

The NIC / driver could be an issue but looking at what your trying to do it should have no issue with approaching 90%+ of transfer speed. The quality of the NIC chip / driver really comes into play when your pushing massive amounts of packets instead of raw file transfers.

ImDisk
http://www.ltr-data.se/opencode.html/

May 19, 2011 1:40:37 AM

I have an integrated Intel NIC in my Dell motherboard. I swear by it.

It has built in diagnostics. It will tell you if and what is wrong with your cable. It will tell you if it has a break in the cable and how far down the cable it is. It runs a full ~5min test on the cable and card to check for signalling issues.

Not only that, it supports offloading of IPv4/6+TCP/UDP. iperf gives me 946mbit (118MB/sec) unidirectional and 1.5gb/sec (187MB/sec) bidirectional. Win7 transfer from computer to computer over SMB2+IPv6+Jumbo and 114MB/sec is only ~0.75% cpu usage on my stock i7-920. Also, I used a hi-res timer ping utility. 0.001ms pings to my wife's comp(who has the same model Dell) and 0.005ms pings from my Netgear 3700 router.

All of this from their low-end integrated NIC on a $800 Dell from 2.5 years ago.

If you really want a good file server, Intel pro nics are awesome.
May 22, 2011 2:01:58 PM

Silly question, but what kind of cabling are you using?
August 18, 2011 8:26:14 PM

also, are you testing the transfer speed using the same file on both servers?

Also, is your network speed setting set to autonegotiate or did you set up at 1gig? if you set it up at 1gig, all the remaining network connections should be the same speed...dont mix and match autonegotiate and set other network cards at 1 gig..they are need to be the same to work properly...

!