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Think I was robbed of my Win 7 retail version

Last response: in Windows 7
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January 20, 2012 4:31:36 AM

I went to staples and paid 199.00 for Win 7 home prem. I then had some issues installing it so I took my rig to a computer shop. I left it there with my Win 7 disc, went back, paid for the service and exited. Before I left the store I verified the install of Win 7, which it worked and seemed to be correct. I just looked at my system and see that the Win 7 product ID is xxxx-OEM-xxxx ect ect. But this is not a OEM version and no where on my disk package or product key does it state OEM. So, before I go in tomorrow and confront this guy with the issues (and because I am a Police Officer and his store is in my jurisdiction) I want to make sure this isn't common. Before I go in a charge this individual with larceny of private property, i want to ensure I am not doing so incorrectly.


January 20, 2012 5:07:47 AM

I don't know about charging the guy, but you might at least go back and ask why the numbers do not match. Also, most OEM copies are $99. It is the retail version(includes manual and bigger packaging, etc.) that cost $199.
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January 20, 2012 5:08:31 AM

They may have just put a OEM version on there because it was faster taking you for a lack of better word "Fool". Now, sometimes they have images sitting around and use a program to install the image to your HDD, I believe norton used to do that, and rather then going though the process with your disc, they just used it instead, as they were used to it. I'd go back in an ask who did the instillation and did they have trouble with it as well, then you'll at least have a name and if they say they never had any issues when you bring up the OEM version they can't deny what happened to troubles installing. Then do your thing!
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a b $ Windows 7
January 20, 2012 5:31:18 AM

ppmp1230 said:
I went to staples and paid 199.00 for Win 7 home prem. I then had some issues installing it so I took my rig to a computer shop. I left it there with my Win 7 disc, went back, paid for the service and exited. Before I left the store I verified the install of Win 7, which it worked and seemed to be correct. I just looked at my system and see that the Win 7 product ID is xxxx-OEM-xxxx ect ect. But this is not a OEM version and no where on my disk package or product key does it state OEM. So, before I go in tomorrow and confront this guy with the issues (and because I am a Police Officer and his store is in my jurisdiction) I want to make sure this isn't common. Before I go in a charge this individual with larceny of private property, i want to ensure I am not doing so incorrectly.



Try this program http://www.magicaljellybean.com/keyfinder/ It will find your product key on the system. See if it matches the product key on your retail copy. Good evidence to have with you. I wonder where the OEM license came from.

Quick question, did you leave the entire package of window 7 home with them or just the disc?


As dorman said, they might have put an OEM copy on there for one reason or another but not to be malicious (possibly even a mistake). I would get your paid copy key activated as soon as possible to verify that it's still useable.


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January 20, 2012 5:52:53 AM

I left the entire package and got everything back to include both 64bit, 32 bit disc along with key and container. The key is the same key I had prior to going in.

thanks, ill activate the paid key tomorrow or call microsoft and have them cancel that key and send me another one.

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a b $ Windows 7
January 20, 2012 5:55:31 AM

ppmp1230 said:
I left the entire package and got everything back to include both 64bit, 32 bit disc along with key and container. The key is the same key I had prior to going in.

thanks, ill activate the paid key tomorrow or call microsoft and have them cancel that key and send me another one.



Sounds good, make sure if you use that program I listed to record the OEM key that the employee possibly put on there. Better yet take a screen shot of it (use the snipping tool built into windows). I'm sure staples would like to know where the employee got that OEM key if indeed they did put one on there.

Good luck.
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January 20, 2012 10:45:58 AM

Oh it wasn't staples, it was a small computer repair shop. I wish it would have been at Staples because I would then get some free ram or something with my complaint lol, but this is just a small shop. Like what has been said, it could have been a mistake or he could have just thought I would not have caught the OEM product ID. He mentioned to me when I asked him about restoring the system that it was just a OEM version but I figured he misspoke, but now I see he didn't.

Thanks for the reply guys!
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a b $ Windows 7
January 20, 2012 10:53:33 AM

Hi :) 

I own Computer shops in the UK...... and we reload windows 7 a LOT... we dont give away 7 keys for any reason...ignoring the fact its illegal, it would cost US money as 7 keys (genuine ones) are like gold dust...

We use the customers key (always) , if its rubbed off (bottom of laptop as example) we make the customer buy another disc and key...

I would be careful about accusing them of something they may not have done assuming there are libel or slander laws in the country wherever you are based...

I cannot see any reason they would put in a different key as its not in their financial interest....

All the best Brett :) 
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January 20, 2012 11:04:19 AM

typical
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a b $ Windows 7
January 20, 2012 2:27:48 PM

Brett928S2 said:
I cannot see any reason they would put in a different key as its not in their financial interest...


Easy, assuming this is an individual that is or has done this before their financial interest equation would look like the this. They would buy the OEM key for $100. Swap OEM for Retail key for free. Sell Retail key for $170. = $70 profit.
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