slide copying

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Silly question I know.
I have just made a Heath Robinson gadget that fits on the front of my
Minolta Z10 so I can copy my many hundreds of 35mm colour slides on to my
hard drive and then on to CDs.
To my surprise it works perfect as the Z10 in macro will focus down to .5"
Only problem is that I need some diffuser material to place between the
slide and my light source which is the sky.
I am using it with a piece cut out of an ice cream carton and the results
are good but there is grainy stuff showing because of the impurity of the
plastic.
My question is what is the correct material that is used in the slide zoom
copiers.
What is it called and can it be bought. Would a Kokin diffuser filter do the
job.
(Yes I did wash the ice cream out first)
Any suggestion welcome.
Cheers.
Jim
19 answers Last reply
More about slide copying
  1. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Jim wrote:
    > Silly question I know.
    > I have just made a Heath Robinson gadget that fits on the front of
    > my
    > Minolta Z10 so I can copy my many hundreds of 35mm colour slides on
    > to my hard drive and then on to CDs.
    > To my surprise it works perfect as the Z10 in macro will focus down
    > to .5" Only problem is that I need some diffuser material to place
    > between the slide and my light source which is the sky.
    > I am using it with a piece cut out of an ice cream carton and the
    > results are good but there is grainy stuff showing because of the
    > impurity of the plastic.
    > My question is what is the correct material that is used in the
    > slide
    > zoom copiers.
    > What is it called and can it be bought. Would a Kokin diffuser
    > filter
    > do the job.
    > (Yes I did wash the ice cream out first)
    > Any suggestion welcome.
    > Cheers.
    > Jim

    Can you apply a little distance between the subject and the diffuser?
    Faster shutter and wider f/stop to reduce depth of field?

    --
    Frank ess
  2. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Jim wrote:
    > Silly question I know.
    > I have just made a Heath Robinson gadget that fits on the front of my
    > Minolta Z10 so I can copy my many hundreds of 35mm colour slides on to my
    > hard drive and then on to CDs.
    > To my surprise it works perfect as the Z10 in macro will focus down to .5"
    > Only problem is that I need some diffuser material to place between the
    > slide and my light source which is the sky.
    > I am using it with a piece cut out of an ice cream carton and the results
    > are good but there is grainy stuff showing because of the impurity of the
    > plastic.
    > My question is what is the correct material that is used in the slide zoom
    > copiers.
    > What is it called and can it be bought. Would a Kokin diffuser filter do the
    > job.
    > (Yes I did wash the ice cream out first)
    > Any suggestion welcome.
    > Cheers.
    > Jim
    >
    >

    Do not use the sky as your light source. It is way too blue.
    Place a piece of White Foamboard or a piece of plywood painted with PURE
    WHITE Flat Paint in direct sunlight. Set up your camera a few feet from
    the white surface and use the reflected light as your light source.
    That matches the color temperature of sunlight very closely. It also
    provides a nice, even, diffused light source for your slide copier.
    Bob Williams
  3. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Jim" <Jimac3remove@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    news:3iqs87FmoldoU1@individual.net...

    > My question is what is the correct material that is used in the slide zoom
    > copiers.
    > What is it called and can it be bought. Would a Kokin diffuser filter do
    the
    > job.
    > (Yes I did wash the ice cream out first)
    > Any suggestion welcome.
    > Cheers.
    > Jim

    If you're in the UK, I'd suggest getting a Jessops slide viewer and using
    the plastic diffuser off that. (It pulls off on my copy.) Afraid it will
    cost about twice that of your ice-cream.
    (If you do go down this route, I'd like to know whether the slide is focused
    correctly. Mine isn't - the lens isn't quite enough, so I'm about to do
    some surgery aided with epoxy.)
    --
    M Stewart
    Milton Keynes, UK
    http://www.megalith.freeserve.co.uk/oddimage.htm
  4. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Malcolm Stewart wrote:

    > "Jim" <Jimac3remove@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    > news:3iqs87FmoldoU1@individual.net...
    >
    >
    >>My question is what is the correct material that is used in the slide zoom
    >>copiers.
    >>What is it called and can it be bought. Would a Kokin diffuser filter do
    >
    > the
    >
    >>job.
    >>(Yes I did wash the ice cream out first)
    >>Any suggestion welcome.
    >>Cheers.
    >>Jim
    >
    >
    > If you're in the UK, I'd suggest getting a Jessops slide viewer and using
    > the plastic diffuser off that. (It pulls off on my copy.) Afraid it will
    > cost about twice that of your ice-cream.
    > (If you do go down this route, I'd like to know whether the slide is focused
    > correctly. Mine isn't - the lens isn't quite enough, so I'm about to do
    > some surgery aided with epoxy.)

    Hi...

    Or if you're in Canada just buy yourself a 4 litre jug of
    milk :)

    After the youngsters finish up the milk cut the neck off
    nice and square with an xacto knife and you'll have the
    nicest light tent you could want.

    Take care.

    Ken
  5. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    I'm in the UK Ken.
    Your idea sounds good. There must be a lot of us Heath Robinsons around.
    Saves a lot of money doesn't it.
    Regards
    Jim


    "Ken Weitzel" <kweitzel@shaw.ca> wrote in message
    news:EeYxe.152308$El.27115@pd7tw1no...
    >
    >
    > Malcolm Stewart wrote:
    >
    >> "Jim" <Jimac3remove@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    >> news:3iqs87FmoldoU1@individual.net...
    >>
    >>
    >>>My question is what is the correct material that is used in the slide
    >>>zoom
    >>>copiers.
    >>>What is it called and can it be bought. Would a Kokin diffuser filter do
    >>
    >> the
    >>
    >>>job.
    >>>(Yes I did wash the ice cream out first)
    >>>Any suggestion welcome.
    >>>Cheers.
    >>>Jim
    >>
    >>
    >> If you're in the UK, I'd suggest getting a Jessops slide viewer and using
    >> the plastic diffuser off that. (It pulls off on my copy.) Afraid it
    >> will
    >> cost about twice that of your ice-cream.
    >> (If you do go down this route, I'd like to know whether the slide is
    >> focused
    >> correctly. Mine isn't - the lens isn't quite enough, so I'm about to do
    >> some surgery aided with epoxy.)
    >
    > Hi...
    >
    > Or if you're in Canada just buy yourself a 4 litre jug of
    > milk :)
    >
    > After the youngsters finish up the milk cut the neck off
    > nice and square with an xacto knife and you'll have the
    > nicest light tent you could want.
    >
    > Take care.
    >
    > Ken
    >
  6. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Sun, 3 Jul 2005 21:58:19 +0100, "Jim" <Jimac3remove@ntlworld.com>
    wrote:

    >I'm in the UK Ken.
    >Your idea sounds good. There must be a lot of us Heath Robinsons around.
    >Saves a lot of money doesn't it.

    OK. I'm a "yank." So who/what is "Heath Robinson?" In the USA, we
    used to have a company that sold Heathkits. Way back when, I built
    several Heathkit radios. Good way to develop soldering skills.
  7. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    You can get a milky mylar sheet at any art supply house. This has a
    specific name but right at the moment I'm having a senior moment as to what
    it is. Be sure to set it far enough away from the plane of focus (the slide
    you are duping) that any grain to it will not show up - consequently you
    will need a lot more that 1 by 1.5 inches of the stuff. Last time I bought
    it a 16x20 sheet was a few dollars. It can also be used to diffuse a point
    light source for many shots, but you have to keep it away from any bulbs.

    --
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    A sample chapter from "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html

    "Jim" <Jimac3remove@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    news:3iqs87FmoldoU1@individual.net...
    > Silly question I know.
    > I have just made a Heath Robinson gadget that fits on the front of my
    > Minolta Z10 so I can copy my many hundreds of 35mm colour slides on to my
    > hard drive and then on to CDs.
    > To my surprise it works perfect as the Z10 in macro will focus down to .5"
    > Only problem is that I need some diffuser material to place between the
    > slide and my light source which is the sky.
    > I am using it with a piece cut out of an ice cream carton and the results
    > are good but there is grainy stuff showing because of the impurity of the
    > plastic.
    > My question is what is the correct material that is used in the slide zoom
    > copiers.
    > What is it called and can it be bought. Would a Kokin diffuser filter do
    the
    > job.
    > (Yes I did wash the ice cream out first)
    > Any suggestion welcome.
    > Cheers.
    > Jim
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Father Kodak" <dont_bother@IDontCare.COM> wrote in message
    news:ujihc155ut6lnnqvts7pk3r5upl4via6pb@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 3 Jul 2005 21:58:19 +0100, "Jim" <Jimac3remove@ntlworld.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I'm in the UK Ken.
    >>Your idea sounds good. There must be a lot of us Heath Robinsons around.
    >>Saves a lot of money doesn't it.
    >
    > OK. I'm a "yank." So who/what is "Heath Robinson?" In the USA, we
    > used to have a company that sold Heathkits. Way back when, I built
    > several Heathkit radios. Good way to develop soldering skills.


    Heath Robinson was a artist and cartoonist (1872-1944)
    He specialised in drawing cartoons of crazy inventions with his vivid
    imagination.
    So any gadgets that are made up of bits & pieces etc are described as Heath
    Robinson.
    Type Heath Robinson in Google to see what I mean.
    Cheers.
    Jim.
  9. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Mon, 4 Jul 2005 11:38:12 +0100, Jim wrote:

    > Heath Robinson was a artist and cartoonist (1872-1944)
    > He specialised in drawing cartoons of crazy inventions with his vivid
    > imagination.
    > So any gadgets that are made up of bits & pieces etc are described as Heath
    > Robinson.


    The equivalent in the USA would be the convoluted devices drawn by
    the famous cartoonist (at least here) Rube Goldberg. He was a
    contemporary of Heath Robinson but slightly younger, and didn't
    start drawing his odd devices until fairly late in his life.

    > Rube Goldberg
    > (4/7/1883 - 7/12/1970, USA)
    >
    > http://www.lambiek.net/goldberg_r.htm
  10. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Tony" <tspadaro@nc.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:Qc2ye.98913$XQ.1736901@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > You can get a milky mylar sheet at any art supply house. This has a
    > specific name but right at the moment I'm having a senior moment as to
    > what
    > it is. Be sure to set it far enough away from the plane of focus (the
    > slide
    > you are duping) that any grain to it will not show up - consequently you
    > will need a lot more that 1 by 1.5 inches of the stuff. Last time I bought
    > it a 16x20 sheet was a few dollars. It can also be used to diffuse a point
    > light source for many shots, but you have to keep it away from any bulbs.
    >
    > --
    > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    > home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    > The Improved Links Pages are at
    > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    > A sample chapter from "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html
    >
    > "Jim" <Jimac3remove@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    > news:3iqs87FmoldoU1@individual.net...
    >> Silly question I know.
    >> I have just made a Heath Robinson gadget that fits on the front of my
    >> Minolta Z10 so I can copy my many hundreds of 35mm colour slides on to my
    >> hard drive and then on to CDs.
    >> To my surprise it works perfect as the Z10 in macro will focus down to
    >> .5"
    >> Only problem is that I need some diffuser material to place between the
    >> slide and my light source which is the sky.
    >> I am using it with a piece cut out of an ice cream carton and the results
    >> are good but there is grainy stuff showing because of the impurity of the
    >> plastic.
    >> My question is what is the correct material that is used in the slide
    >> zoom
    >> copiers.
    >> What is it called and can it be bought. Would a Kokin diffuser filter do
    > the
    >> job.
    >> (Yes I did wash the ice cream out first)
    >> Any suggestion welcome.
    >> Cheers.
    >> Jim
    >>
    >>
    > Thanks to all who replied and I am trying various suggestions at the
    > moment.
    Seem to be getting best results by not using a diffuser at all and pointing
    the camera at a white painted board some two feet in front of the lens. The
    board is facing and reflecting the daylight.
    Black & white negs come out pretty good but colour slides are very
    contrasty.
    This was always a fault when I used to copy 35mm transparences using a zoom
    copier on the front of a SLR film camera.
    However, I think the results are now good enough to put them all into a
    slide show and copy to CD.
    Funny how they look much better when viewed from a few feet away instead of
    when working close up to the monitor.
    Thanks again for all the help.
    Regards.
    Jim.
    >
  11. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Have you tried Kodak slide duping film? The ISO is about 10 but speed is not
    too important. What you are doing is essentially the same as using the mylar
    but probably 2 to 3 stops slower.
    By the way, you can have a lot of fun (and even get an occasional usable
    shot) by shining flashlights with coloured gels over them on the board so
    some areas gain a "tint". I used to do this a lot when making slides from
    B/W originals - which also involved an inter-positive, and were consequently
    a real PITA.

    --
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    A sample chapter from "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html

    "Jim" <Jimac3remove@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    news:3iv6euFnbb4iU1@individual.net...
    >
    > "Tony" <tspadaro@nc.rr.com> wrote in message
    > news:Qc2ye.98913$XQ.1736901@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > > You can get a milky mylar sheet at any art supply house. This has a
    > > specific name but right at the moment I'm having a senior moment as to
    > > what
    > > it is. Be sure to set it far enough away from the plane of focus (the
    > > slide
    > > you are duping) that any grain to it will not show up - consequently you
    > > will need a lot more that 1 by 1.5 inches of the stuff. Last time I
    bought
    > > it a 16x20 sheet was a few dollars. It can also be used to diffuse a
    point
    > > light source for many shots, but you have to keep it away from any
    bulbs.
    > >
    > > --
    > > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    > > home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    > > The Improved Links Pages are at
    > > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    > > A sample chapter from "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    > > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html
    > >
    > > "Jim" <Jimac3remove@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    > > news:3iqs87FmoldoU1@individual.net...
    > >> Silly question I know.
    > >> I have just made a Heath Robinson gadget that fits on the front of my
    > >> Minolta Z10 so I can copy my many hundreds of 35mm colour slides on to
    my
    > >> hard drive and then on to CDs.
    > >> To my surprise it works perfect as the Z10 in macro will focus down to
    > >> .5"
    > >> Only problem is that I need some diffuser material to place between the
    > >> slide and my light source which is the sky.
    > >> I am using it with a piece cut out of an ice cream carton and the
    results
    > >> are good but there is grainy stuff showing because of the impurity of
    the
    > >> plastic.
    > >> My question is what is the correct material that is used in the slide
    > >> zoom
    > >> copiers.
    > >> What is it called and can it be bought. Would a Kokin diffuser filter
    do
    > > the
    > >> job.
    > >> (Yes I did wash the ice cream out first)
    > >> Any suggestion welcome.
    > >> Cheers.
    > >> Jim
    > >>
    > >>
    > > Thanks to all who replied and I am trying various suggestions at the
    > > moment.
    > Seem to be getting best results by not using a diffuser at all and
    pointing
    > the camera at a white painted board some two feet in front of the lens.
    The
    > board is facing and reflecting the daylight.
    > Black & white negs come out pretty good but colour slides are very
    > contrasty.
    > This was always a fault when I used to copy 35mm transparences using a
    zoom
    > copier on the front of a SLR film camera.
    > However, I think the results are now good enough to put them all into a
    > slide show and copy to CD.
    > Funny how they look much better when viewed from a few feet away instead
    of
    > when working close up to the monitor.
    > Thanks again for all the help.
    > Regards.
    > Jim.
    > >
    >
    >
  12. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Hi Tony,
    Grateful for your suggestion but my original question is about copying all
    my old 35mm colour slides on to my digital camera and then on to CDs.
    I was just comparing the contrasty results I'm getting now, with the same
    results I used to get when copying these slides with a SLR film camera.
    Sorry if I misled you but I'm not using film any more. Only digital.
    Tried making a slide show last night using my copied transparencies and it
    was quite acceptable.
    Thanks again.
    Cheers.
    Jim


    "Tony" <tspadaro@nc.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:DaEye.123567$XQ.1972206@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > Have you tried Kodak slide duping film? The ISO is about 10 but speed is
    > not
    > too important. What you are doing is essentially the same as using the
    > mylar
    > but probably 2 to 3 stops slower.
    > By the way, you can have a lot of fun (and even get an occasional usable
    > shot) by shining flashlights with coloured gels over them on the board so
    > some areas gain a "tint". I used to do this a lot when making slides from
    > B/W originals - which also involved an inter-positive, and were
    > consequently
    > a real PITA.
    >
    > --
    > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    > home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    > The Improved Links Pages are at
    > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    > A sample chapter from "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html
    >
    > "Jim" <Jimac3remove@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    > news:3iv6euFnbb4iU1@individual.net...
    >>
    >> "Tony" <tspadaro@nc.rr.com> wrote in message
    >>>> >
    >> > --
    >> >>> >> Silly question I know.
    >> >> I have just made a Heath Robinson gadget that fits on the front of my
    >> >> Minolta Z10 so I can copy my many hundreds of 35mm colour slides on to
    > my
    >> >> hard drive and then on to CDs.
    >> >> To my surprise it works perfect as the Z10 in macro will focus down to
    >> >> .5"
    >> >> Only problem is that I need some diffuser material to place between
    >> >> the
    >> >> slide and my light source which is the sky.
    >> >> I am using it with a piece cut out of an ice cream carton and the
    > results
    >> >> are good but there is grainy stuff showing because of the impurity of
    > the
    >> >> plastic.
    >> >> My question is what is the correct material that is used in the slide
    >> >> zoom
    >> >> copiers.
    >> >> What is it called and can it be bought. Would a Kokin diffuser filter
    > do
    >> > the
    >> >> job.
    >> >> (Yes I did wash the ice cream out first)
    >> >> Any suggestion welcome.
    >> >> Cheers.
    >> >> Jim
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> > Thanks to all who replied and I am trying various suggestions at the
    >> > moment.
    >> Seem to be getting best results by not using a diffuser at all and
    > pointing
    >> the camera at a white painted board some two feet in front of the lens.
    > The
    >> board is facing and reflecting the daylight.
    >> Black & white negs come out pretty good but colour slides are very
    >> contrasty.
    >> This was always a fault when I used to copy 35mm transparences using a
    > zoom
    >> copier on the front of a SLR film camera.
    >> However, I think the results are now good enough to put them all into a
    >> slide show and copy to CD.
    >> Funny how they look much better when viewed from a few feet away instead
    > of
    >> when working close up to the monitor.
    >> Thanks again for all the help.
    >> Regards.
    >> Jim.
    >> >
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Jim wrote:
    > Hi Tony,
    > Grateful for your suggestion but my original question is about
    > copying all my old 35mm colour slides on to my digital camera and
    > then on to CDs. I was just comparing the contrasty results I'm
    > getting now, with the
    > same results I used to get when copying these slides with a SLR film
    > camera. Sorry if I misled you but I'm not using film any more. Only
    > digital. Tried making a slide show last night using my copied
    > transparencies and it was quite acceptable.
    > Thanks again.
    > Cheers.
    > Jim
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Tony" <tspadaro@nc.rr.com> wrote in message
    > news:DaEye.123567$XQ.1972206@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    >> Have you tried Kodak slide duping film?

    <snip>

    Can you arrange to let a little light touch the near surface of the
    color slides when you make your exposures? In viewing slides it
    changes the character of what you see a bit, to improvement of the
    experience. Maybe reduce the contrast that way.

    --
    Frank ess
  14. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Process is the same on film or digital so I guess I just slipped into
    film mode without thinking. Don't have any suggestions for reducing contrast
    for digital but wonder if combining 2 or more exposures in photoshop might
    be the answer? I really don't know and am just throwing that out as a
    possibility.

    --
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    A sample chapter from "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html

    "Jim" <Jimac3remove@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    news:3j1iubFnjeiiU1@individual.net...
    > Hi Tony,
    > Grateful for your suggestion but my original question is about copying all
    > my old 35mm colour slides on to my digital camera and then on to CDs.
    > I was just comparing the contrasty results I'm getting now, with the same
    > results I used to get when copying these slides with a SLR film camera.
    > Sorry if I misled you but I'm not using film any more. Only digital.
    > Tried making a slide show last night using my copied transparencies and it
    > was quite acceptable.
    > Thanks again.
    > Cheers.
    > Jim
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Tony" <tspadaro@nc.rr.com> wrote in message
    > news:DaEye.123567$XQ.1972206@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > > Have you tried Kodak slide duping film? The ISO is about 10 but speed is
    > > not
    > > too important. What you are doing is essentially the same as using the
    > > mylar
    > > but probably 2 to 3 stops slower.
    > > By the way, you can have a lot of fun (and even get an occasional
    usable
    > > shot) by shining flashlights with coloured gels over them on the board
    so
    > > some areas gain a "tint". I used to do this a lot when making slides
    from
    > > B/W originals - which also involved an inter-positive, and were
    > > consequently
    > > a real PITA.
    > >
    > > --
    > > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    > > home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    > > The Improved Links Pages are at
    > > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    > > A sample chapter from "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    > > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html
    > >
    > > "Jim" <Jimac3remove@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    > > news:3iv6euFnbb4iU1@individual.net...
    > >>
    > >> "Tony" <tspadaro@nc.rr.com> wrote in message
    > >>>> >
    > >> > --
    > >> >>> >> Silly question I know.
    > >> >> I have just made a Heath Robinson gadget that fits on the front of
    my
    > >> >> Minolta Z10 so I can copy my many hundreds of 35mm colour slides on
    to
    > > my
    > >> >> hard drive and then on to CDs.
    > >> >> To my surprise it works perfect as the Z10 in macro will focus down
    to
    > >> >> .5"
    > >> >> Only problem is that I need some diffuser material to place between
    > >> >> the
    > >> >> slide and my light source which is the sky.
    > >> >> I am using it with a piece cut out of an ice cream carton and the
    > > results
    > >> >> are good but there is grainy stuff showing because of the impurity
    of
    > > the
    > >> >> plastic.
    > >> >> My question is what is the correct material that is used in the
    slide
    > >> >> zoom
    > >> >> copiers.
    > >> >> What is it called and can it be bought. Would a Kokin diffuser
    filter
    > > do
    > >> > the
    > >> >> job.
    > >> >> (Yes I did wash the ice cream out first)
    > >> >> Any suggestion welcome.
    > >> >> Cheers.
    > >> >> Jim
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >> > Thanks to all who replied and I am trying various suggestions at the
    > >> > moment.
    > >> Seem to be getting best results by not using a diffuser at all and
    > > pointing
    > >> the camera at a white painted board some two feet in front of the lens.
    > > The
    > >> board is facing and reflecting the daylight.
    > >> Black & white negs come out pretty good but colour slides are very
    > >> contrasty.
    > >> This was always a fault when I used to copy 35mm transparences using a
    > > zoom
    > >> copier on the front of a SLR film camera.
    > >> However, I think the results are now good enough to put them all into a
    > >> slide show and copy to CD.
    > >> Funny how they look much better when viewed from a few feet away
    instead
    > > of
    > >> when working close up to the monitor.
    > >> Thanks again for all the help.
    > >> Regards.
    > >> Jim.
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  15. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Jim" <Jimac3remove@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    news:3iqs87FmoldoU1@individual.net...
    > Silly question I know.
    > I have just made a Heath Robinson gadget that fits on the front of my
    > Minolta Z10 so I can copy my many hundreds of 35mm colour slides on to my
    > hard drive and then on to CDs.
    > To my surprise it works perfect as the Z10 in macro will focus down to .5"
    > Only problem is that I need some diffuser material to place between the
    > slide and my light source which is the sky.
    > I am using it with a piece cut out of an ice cream carton and the results
    > are good but there is grainy stuff showing because of the impurity of the
    > plastic.
    > My question is what is the correct material that is used in the slide zoom
    > copiers.
    > What is it called and can it be bought. Would a Kokin diffuser filter do
    > the job.
    > (Yes I did wash the ice cream out first)
    > Any suggestion welcome.
    > Cheers.
    > Jim


    I have been admiring all the e-mails, suggestions and sensible replies to my
    original posting (above). and thank everyone of you.
    This is surely what newsgroups were designed for, to help each other.
    Sometimes when I read other newsgroups I dismay at the rediculous rantings
    and filthy language that are heaped on the OP who is simply asking advice.
    Please keep up the good work, and you have all been very helpful to me an
    oldie not very computer savvy.
    Jim.

    >
    >
  16. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    In article <eOidnW9LgsGVjFHfRVn-2Q@giganews.com>, Frank ess
    <frank@fshe2fs.com> writes
    >Jim wrote:
    >> Hi Tony,
    >> Grateful for your suggestion but my original question is about
    >> copying all my old 35mm colour slides on to my digital camera and
    >> then on to CDs. I was just comparing the contrasty results I'm
    >>getting now, with the
    >> same results I used to get when copying these slides with a SLR film
    >> camera. Sorry if I misled you but I'm not using film any more. Only
    >> digital. Tried making a slide show last night using my copied
    >> transparencies and it was quite acceptable.
    >> Thanks again.
    >> Cheers.
    >> Jim
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Tony" <tspadaro@nc.rr.com> wrote in message
    >> news:DaEye.123567$XQ.1972206@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    >>> Have you tried Kodak slide duping film?
    >
    ><snip>
    >
    >Can you arrange to let a little light touch the near surface of the
    >color slides when you make your exposures? In viewing slides it
    >changes the character of what you see a bit, to improvement of the
    >experience. Maybe reduce the contrast that way.
    >
    Frank,

    This is similar to the idea used in the Bowens Illumitran 3S slide
    copier (that's "illumitran" - capital i looks very like l on text-only
    readers!).

    Jim,

    If you have a ^lot^ of slides to copy and want to reduce the contrast -
    and find it does not work to do the reduction in software - then you
    could do worse than to look for one of these. They consist of a small
    copy stand, with a base unit with built in flash, a small column and a
    bellows unit at the top to put your camera on. Put your camera at the
    top (it will work with a DSLR as well as with a film camera) and an
    enlarger lens at the base of the bellows.

    The clever bit with the 3S is that there is a contrast control unit.
    Some of the flash light (or it may be a separate flash tube, I'm not
    about to take mine apart to see!) is diverted via a glass plate fixed at
    45 degrees between the main flash unit in the base and the
    lens/bellows/camera unit. By adjusting a dial the brightness of this
    subsidiary flash is controlled relative to the main flash; more of
    course will reduce the contrast, less will increase it.

    These units used to be available easily second hand for £300 or so a few
    years ago, but I guess the price will have dropped substantially as for
    most things designed for film use. Be aware, though, that some
    Illumitran units were sold without the contrast control unit, make sure
    you get one with it.

    If you are not able to find one for a price you are prepared to pay,
    then you could use a lash-up, as Frank suggests, maybe using the same
    idea.

    I suspect, though, that you should be able to do the contrast reduction
    satisfactorily in software, either on the RAW files using whatever
    handles your RAW output, or on the processed files in Photoshop. In the
    latter case you could produce in a couple of minutes a batch file
    ("action" IIRC) to do a whole lot at once.

    David
    --
    David Littlewood
  17. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 11:41:34 +0100, Jim wrote:

    ---------------------------------cut------------------------------------
    >>> I have just made a Heath Robinson gadget that fits on the front of
    my
    >>> Minolta Z10 so I can copy my many hundreds of 35mm colour slides on to my
    >>> hard drive and then on to CDs.
    >>> To my surprise it works perfect as the Z10 in macro will focus down to
    >>> .5"
    -------------------------------cut-------------------------------------

    I just joined this tread, but also thinking of somehow digitalizing all
    (or some) of my thousands slides, all nicely in place in carusels.

    What is a Heath Robinson gadget?

    Is this something holding the slide in front of the camera and use a
    "macro"{ setting?

    Is this better/faster than using a scanner?

    TIA

    Peter
    --

    Peter Kerekes
  18. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Thu, 7 Jul 2005 20:03:59 -0400, Peter Kerekes wrote:

    > I just joined this tread, but also thinking of . . .
    >
    > What is a Heath Robinson gadget?

    40tude_Dialog is a capable newsreader, so you should be able to
    read the earlier parts of this not-very-old thread and all will be
    revealed. Or search the web. Or think Rube Goldberg.
  19. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Peter Kerekes" <pkerekes@ca.inter.net> wrote in message
    news:t4ct02t5ucit.1wt38ucqy3moh$.dlg@40tude.net...
    > On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 11:41:34 +0100, Jim wrote:
    >
    > ---------------------------------cut------------------------------------
    >>>> I have just made a Heath Robinson gadget that fits on the front of
    > my
    >>>> Minolta Z10 so I can copy my many hundreds of 35mm colour slides on to
    >>>> my
    >>>> hard drive and then on to CDs.
    >>>> To my surprise it works perfect as the Z10 in macro will focus down to
    >>>> .5"
    > -------------------------------cut-------------------------------------
    >
    > I just joined this tread, but also thinking of somehow digitalizing all
    > (or some) of my thousands slides, all nicely in place in carusels.
    >
    > What is a Heath Robinson gadget?
    >
    > Is this something holding the slide in front of the camera and use a
    > "macro"{ setting?
    >
    > Is this better/faster than using a scanner?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Peter
    > --
    >
    > Peter Kerekes


    Hello Peter.
    I have never tried using a scanner to copy slides so I can't comment on how
    good they are in comparison to other methods.
    I have quite a few hundred I want to copy but don't feel I can justify
    spending a lot of money on the project as once I have finished them, I won't
    need to do any ever again.
    Simple gadget I made was a 43mm to 52mm step ring that fits on to my camera.
    Then I simply cut layers and layers of cardboard with a suitable sized hole
    cut in the middle and leaving slots for the mounted slide to drop in to.
    Glued it all on to the front of the step ring and a piece of white diffusing
    material on the very front of that.
    My camera will focus down to half an inch in macro. Hey presto it works.
    I have been just pointing the whole thing at the sky to take the shots but
    they were very contrasty so I have tried the various methods given to me by
    these great guys in this newsgroup.
    The quality of the finished copies are not as good as the originals so I am
    editing each one in Photosuite 7. When I view them as a slide show, they
    look pretty good when viewing them from about 3 or 4 feet away.
    Cheers
    Jim
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