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CPU for gaming [i5 vs i7]

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  • CPUs
  • Intel i7
  • Intel
  • Intel i5
Last response: in CPUs
August 27, 2012 3:40:19 PM

I about to buy Intel Core i5-2500K or Intel Core i7-2600... I already decided to buy EVGA Geforce GTX570 HD SC DDR5 1.2GB.. So which processor will be better for this graphic card?

Some questions:
1) I heard that you can overclock the K series. Do i need a specific motherboard for this? Will it make 2500k better than 2600?
2) I also read somewhere that for gaming i5 its have not big difference with i7. Is it true?
3) Can i play whatever game on max settings with one of this cpu and my selected video card??

More about : cpu gaming

August 27, 2012 3:49:02 PM

There is not much of a difference between and i5 or an i7, unless you want to take advantage of the i7's hyper threading(not really necessary when gaming). I would recommend the i5-2500K, and like you said, it is possible to overclock this processor. If you are willing to spend a bit more money, i also suggest the i5-3570K. And answering your last question, yes, you should be able to max most games out.
August 27, 2012 3:56:30 PM

ganoly3 said:
There is not much of a difference between and i5 or an i7, unless you want to take advantage of the i7's hyper threading(not really necessary when gaming). I would recommend the i5-2500K, and like you said, it is possible to overclock this processor. If you are willing to spend a bit more money, i also suggest the i5-3570K. And answering your last question, yes, you should be able to max most games out.


Thank you for your answer.... Do i need any specific motherboard to make overclock or its not matter?
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a c 117 à CPUs
August 27, 2012 3:58:31 PM

Most boards will let you overclock but just double check before you buy one.
August 27, 2012 4:04:23 PM

jay_nar2012 said:
Most boards will let you overclock but just double check before you buy one.


How to check it? What should be written in the specification?

Edit: bwrlane answered my question
a b à CPUs
August 27, 2012 4:06:11 PM

Any Z68 or Z77 motherboard will do. For games, an i5 is as good as the i7 for less money. i7 shines in other areas, making it worth the extra for some people, but not for gamers.

Btw I would consider the GTX 670, the AMD 7970 or the 7950. They are significantly better than the 570. To be honest, with almost any card on the market, you do have to compromise on some settings to get completely fluid frame rates. The only (single card) exception is perhaps the 690. As an example, I found that with everything turned up to max, my 680 was struggling in Witcher 2, so I bought another. Both of them DO deliver a consistently smooth experience, but it isn't really a mainstream option.
a c 639 à CPUs
a c 205 å Intel
August 27, 2012 4:43:14 PM

I would generally recommend an Ivy Bridge CPU (i5-3570k) over a Sandy Bridge CPU (i5-2500k) due a little better average performance of 5% (i.e. more efficient) assuming same clock speeds. Also Ivy Bridge consumes a little less power of about 15w - 20w under full load. However, the main complaint about IB CPUs is that they do not overclock as high as SB CPUs because of heat. However, this is offset a bit by the increase in performance efficiency.

I would look for a motherboard with a Z77 chipset which allows you to overclock any "K" model Ivy Bridge or Sandy Bridge CPU. Choosing an IB CPU also allow you to take full advantage of PCI-e 3.0 bandwidth (2x that of PCI-e 2.0). However, graphic cards are not likely to need the bandwidth of PCI-e 3.0 at least for another 2 more generations (i.e. Radeon "HD 9xxx" and GeForce "GTX 8xx" series) and only for the high end cards priced at $500+.

Sticking a SB CPU in a Z77 motherboard means that the PCI-e 3.0 slot will operate like a PCI-e 2.0 slot.

If the primary purpose of the PC is to play games, then avoid paying extra $$$ for an Intel CPU with Hyper Threading (HT) tech (i.e. i7-2600k , i7-3770k). Games do not make use of HT, in fact over the years benchmarks have shown an average of 1% - 2% decrease in game performance when HT is being used. It's great for other things though like video encoding.
August 27, 2012 4:59:15 PM

As the other have said, most motherboards support overclocking, so that should not be much of an issue.