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7000 series or wait for kepler

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March 8, 2012 3:18:10 AM

ive got a 5870 , should i upgrade to a 7000 series or wait for nvidia kepler,im just itchin to do somthing

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a c 1406 U Graphics card
a c 160 Î Nvidia
March 8, 2012 11:28:28 AM

It is up to you but at this point in time I would wait and see what kepler brings.
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a c 214 U Graphics card
a b Î Nvidia
March 8, 2012 11:31:09 AM

Why don't you get another for crossfire? The 5870 is still a powerful card.Anyway I would suggest waiting as I believe the prices may drop or fluxuate once the Nvidia cards are on the market.
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a b U Graphics card
March 8, 2012 11:45:52 AM

5870 has terrible crossfire scalling, I was going to do that exact thing, the 7870 looks like a fantastic deal based on latest reviews, I'd bet that in crossfire down the road would be a smart long term plan.
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a b U Graphics card
a b Î Nvidia
March 8, 2012 11:46:23 AM

Yep, Wait for Kepler. Just to tell you guys what kind of a performance Kepler will bring....

http://www.geforce.com/News/articles/epic-shows-samarit...

If you read that article. It will say...

Last year at the Game Developers Conference, Epic Games unveiled the jaw-dropping Samaritan demo, a look at the next generation of videogame graphics. Created in a dark, futuristic setting, the demo utilized a host of advanced rendering techniques that smoothly tessellated and morphed facial features, created realistic street scenes using point light reflections, and replicated the work of the best movie directors through the use of fine-tuned out of focus bokeh filters. The only downside was that it took three GeForce GTX 580s to run the demo in real-time.

Today GDC 2012 is upon us, and once again Epic has shown the Samaritan demo, but this time with a twist - instead of three GeForce GTX 580s, the demo was shown running on a single next generation NVIDIA graphics card.

At the conclusion of the demo the card in question was revealed to be our much-anticipated ‘Kepler’ GPU, the follow-up to our current-generation Fermi card. Although no further information on Kepler was given, the demo sent a clear message: the graphics in Samaritan, generally regarded as a glimpse of the gaming industry’s far-off future, will in fact be possible in the near future on PC systems running a single next-generation graphics card.

But it wasn't just the Kepler graphics card that made the demo possible. As important was the addition of Fast Approximate Anti-Aliasing (FXAA), an NVIDIA-developed anti-aliasing technique aiming to improve upon the established success of Multisample Anti-Aliasing (MSAA), the form of anti-aliasing most commonly seen in today’s games. Used to smooth out jagged edges and improve visual fidelity, anti-aliasing is key to creating the incredible sights of Samaritan.

Despite MSAA's popularity, "it is relatively costly in the demo because Samaritan uses deferred shading," explains Ignacio Llamas, a Senior Research Scientist at NVIDIA who worked with Epic on the FXAA implementation. By writing pixel attributes to off-screen render targets prior to final shading, deferred shading enables complex, realistic lighting effects that would be otherwise impossible using forward rendering, a lighting technique commonly used in many game engines. There are a couple of downsides to this: first the render targets require four times the memory since they must hold the information of four samples per pixel; and second, the deferred shading work is also multiplied by four in areas with numerous pieces of intersecting geometry.

"Without anti-aliasing, Samaritan’s lighting pass uses about 120MB of GPU memory. Enabling 4x MSAA consumes close to 500MB, or a third of what's available on the GTX 580. This increased memory pressure makes it more challenging to fit the demo’s highly detailed textures into the GPU’s available VRAM, and led to increased paging and GPU memory thrashing, which can sometimes decrease framerates.”

"FXAA is a shader-based anti-aliasing technique,” however, and as such “doesn't require additional memory so it's much more performance friendly for deferred renderers such as Samaritan." By freeing up this additional memory developers will have the option of reinvesting it in additional textures or other niceties, increasing graphical fidelity even further.

FXAA can also produce gradients smoother than those of 4x MSAA, as is particularly evident in the Samaritan demo, shown below in our interactive comparison images contrasting the anti-aliasing quality of MSAA and FXAA 3.
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a c 1406 U Graphics card
a c 160 Î Nvidia
March 8, 2012 11:48:37 AM

Rockdpm said:
Yep, Wait for Kepler. Just to tell you guys what kind of a performance Kepler will bring....

http://www.geforce.com/News/articles/epic-shows-samarit...

If you read that article. It will say...

Last year at the Game Developers Conference, Epic Games unveiled the jaw-dropping Samaritan demo, a look at the next generation of videogame graphics. Created in a dark, futuristic setting, the demo utilized a host of advanced rendering techniques that smoothly tessellated and morphed facial features, created realistic street scenes using point light reflections, and replicated the work of the best movie directors through the use of fine-tuned out of focus bokeh filters. The only downside was that it took three GeForce GTX 580s to run the demo in real-time.

Today GDC 2012 is upon us, and once again Epic has shown the Samaritan demo, but this time with a twist - instead of three GeForce GTX 580s, the demo was shown running on a single next generation NVIDIA graphics card.

At the conclusion of the demo the card in question was revealed to be our much-anticipated ‘Kepler’ GPU, the follow-up to our current-generation Fermi card. Although no further information on Kepler was given, the demo sent a clear message: the graphics in Samaritan, generally regarded as a glimpse of the gaming industry’s far-off future, will in fact be possible in the near future on PC systems running a single next-generation graphics card.

But it wasn't just the Kepler graphics card that made the demo possible. As important was the addition of Fast Approximate Anti-Aliasing (FXAA), an NVIDIA-developed anti-aliasing technique aiming to improve upon the established success of Multisample Anti-Aliasing (MSAA), the form of anti-aliasing most commonly seen in today’s games. Used to smooth out jagged edges and improve visual fidelity, anti-aliasing is key to creating the incredible sights of Samaritan.

Despite MSAA's popularity, "it is relatively costly in the demo because Samaritan uses deferred shading," explains Ignacio Llamas, a Senior Research Scientist at NVIDIA who worked with Epic on the FXAA implementation. By writing pixel attributes to off-screen render targets prior to final shading, deferred shading enables complex, realistic lighting effects that would be otherwise impossible using forward rendering, a lighting technique commonly used in many game engines. There are a couple of downsides to this: first the render targets require four times the memory since they must hold the information of four samples per pixel; and second, the deferred shading work is also multiplied by four in areas with numerous pieces of intersecting geometry.

"Without anti-aliasing, Samaritan’s lighting pass uses about 120MB of GPU memory. Enabling 4x MSAA consumes close to 500MB, or a third of what's available on the GTX 580. This increased memory pressure makes it more challenging to fit the demo’s highly detailed textures into the GPU’s available VRAM, and led to increased paging and GPU memory thrashing, which can sometimes decrease framerates.”

"FXAA is a shader-based anti-aliasing technique,” however, and as such “doesn't require additional memory so it's much more performance friendly for deferred renderers such as Samaritan." By freeing up this additional memory developers will have the option of reinvesting it in additional textures or other niceties, increasing graphical fidelity even further.

FXAA can also produce gradients smoother than those of 4x MSAA, as is particularly evident in the Samaritan demo, shown below in our interactive comparison images contrasting the anti-aliasing quality of MSAA and FXAA 3.

I will believe when I see reviews from third party hardware sites, nvidia for sure has nothing bad to say about their cards!
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March 8, 2012 11:52:46 AM

In other news, Nvidia says Nvidia's card is good.

The best info we currently says that the GTX 680 will be somewhere between trading blows with a 7970 and being 10% faster - hardly impressive for a launch 3 months later.

http://www.techpowerup.com/161972/GeForce-GTX-680-Featu...

That said, we're so close to Kepler launch that there's really no reason at this point not to wait and see.
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March 8, 2012 11:59:29 AM

Wait for Kepler, so you can get a better deal, regardless of which brand you choose.
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March 8, 2012 12:06:19 PM

if you are happy now, wait for Kepler, from what I am seeing from the 7870 you wont be disapointed with it, and it could be several more months before the $ 350 600s card is released (670?)

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March 8, 2012 11:19:39 PM

thanks guys i was thinking to wait but just wanted to get a sec opinion, like i said im itchin to do something with my build and the gpu is all have to do something with.

thanks again
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March 8, 2012 11:19:55 PM

Best answer selected by momazboy.
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