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Sound loop and crash

im not really sure where to put this.
sorry if i leave something out. i have told this story way too many times.

i posted this on another forum and we never really found an answer.

about 2 months ago we had a bad thunder storm. the power dimmed a few times. and then the power turned off.
ever since then my computer has been acting funny.
my computer randomly crashes/freezes and if i had any sound playing, it would loop.

things i have tried since then.
update bios
run memtest
cleared my cmos
reinstalled windows

after 10+ hours messing with ram combinations and prime95. i found out that if i run my computer with 2 ram sticks, it is fine. and that is with any 2 sticks in any 2 slots. if i put 4 sticks of ram in, it fails prime95(blend) within 20 minutes. this happens in both windows and linux

i have emailed gigabyte, and they said it can be my ram, cpu(memory controller), gpu, or psu. well without buying a new computer, there isnt really a way for me to test this. i have also emailed intel. they havent responded yet.


specs.
cpu: intel core i5 2500k
motherboard: gigabyte ga-z68x-ud3h-b3 rev1.0
ram: kingston hyperx 2x(2x2gb) 1600mhz 9-9-9-27 (KHX1600C9D3K2/4GX)x2 (made sure both kits are from the same batch)
psu: corsair 750tx v1
gpu: sparkle gtx 560ti
case: antec P280

here is the thread on the other forum. not meaning to advertise, just for info. :??:
http://www.overclock.net/t/1296442/sound-loop-and-computer-crash

so i guess my question is. has anyone seen this before? or maybe have a suggestion?
6 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about sound loop crash
  1. Your post suggests that the problem could be either a bad mobo, or you simply need to increase voltage to your DIMM slots. I haven't read through your other post yet, so If you've already tried increasing your DRAM voltage, forgive me.

    Edit: OK. Read your oc.net thread, and they've covered the same diagnostic theories (timing, voltage, frequency).

    Questions:

    1. Before the power failure event, were you using more then two RAM sticks at a time?
    2. Before the power failure event, what kind of load did you put on your system?
    3. Have you tested the PSU to see if the voltages are still within acceptable tolerances?
  2. for the first 2 questions, im not sure if you mean right before. or in general.
    1. i have been running 4 sticks of ram, for about a year.
    2. im pretty sure i was playing a game right before the power went out. so maybe 50% load.
    3. how could i test my psu? i have looked at the voltages in the bios. but im not sure if thats enough.

    these voltages are from the bios and with the ram at 1333.
    Vcore 1.224v
    DDR15v 1.512v
    +12v 12.073v
    Vcc3 3.344v
    Vcc 5.062v
    Vtt 1.076v

    and here is a screen shot of hwmonitor. and the ram is at 1600

    http://img253.imageshack.us/img253/553/hwmonitor.png
  3. Best answer
    In regards to the RAM questions, I wanted to know if you were using all 4 DIMMs prior to the power outage because I wanted to rule out defective DIMM slots, but since you were using 4 DIMMs prior to the power outage, this isn't the case.

    Your temps and voltages look fine for your CPU and RAM.

    To test the PSU (but honestly, I don't think this is the problem) you should use a digital multimeter. With the DMM, you'd connect the black lead to either a bare metal spot on the chassis, or to any one of the black wires at the back of the P1 connector (the 24-pin connector). The red lead would be touched to the following wires, to achieve the following results:

    Yellow = +12V
    Orange = +3.3V
    Red = +5v
    Blue = -12V
    Green = +5V
    Purple = +5V
    Brown = +3.3V

    Note: These values have approximately 10% tolerance.

    I suspect, though, that your mobo has a problem. All of that P95 testing you did seems pretty conclusive that your mobo doesn't handle the load of all 4 DIMMs being occupied. According to Intel, you shouldn't set your DRAM voltage higher than 1.65V, or you'll risk damaging the CPU; however, when occupying 4 DIMM slots, you often need to increase the DRAM voltage to retain stability. That said, if you feel like trying, you can experiment by:

    1. increasing your DRAM voltage by ~.02; or
    2, reducing your DRAM frequency to 1333, but keep the voltage at 1.65
  4. T_T said:
    In regards to the RAM questions, I wanted to know if you were using all 4 DIMMs prior to the power outage because I wanted to rule out defective DIMM slots, but since you were using 4 DIMMs prior to the power outage, this isn't the case.

    Your temps and voltages look fine for your CPU and RAM.

    To test the PSU (but honestly, I don't think this is the problem) you should use a digital multimeter. With the DMM, you'd connect the black lead to either a bare metal spot on the chassis, or to any one of the black wires at the back of the P1 connector (the 24-pin connector). The red lead would be touched to the following wires, to achieve the following results:

    Yellow = +12V
    Orange = +3.3V
    Red = +5v
    Blue = -12V
    Green = +5V
    Purple = +5V
    Brown = +3.3V

    Note: These values have approximately 10% tolerance.

    I suspect, though, that your mobo has a problem. All of that P95 testing you did seems pretty conclusive that your mobo doesn't handle the load of all 4 DIMMs being occupied. According to Intel, you shouldn't set your DRAM voltage higher than 1.65V, or you'll risk damaging the CPU; however, when occupying 4 DIMM slots, you often need to increase the DRAM voltage to retain stability. That said, if you feel like trying, you can experiment by:

    1. increasing your DRAM voltage by ~.02; or
    2, reducing your DRAM frequency to 1333, but keep the voltage at 1.65


    ok sorry it has been so long. but i ended up dropping the speed to 1333 while keeping the voltage at 1.65. and it was stable for over 4 hours, running p95 blend. do you know what would cause this?

    thank you for all the help
  5. Best answer selected by tappeddarkman.
  6. If prior to the power outage you were using RAM at 1600 MHz, and it was stable, then the only theory I can come up with is that a small power surge may have happened, and the power supply and/or motherboard may have taken a hit.
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