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Is 74*c to high for a GPU

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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March 9, 2012 6:15:28 AM

I've recently bought a MSI GTX 560 Ti 1024MB DDR5 TWIN FROZR II OC Edition Dual DVI Mini HDMI PCI-E Graphics Card and Corsair 600W CX Series V2 PSU - 6x SATA 2x PCI-E.

I've BEEN PLAYING SWTOR and BF3 while running the msi afterburner and it tells me my GPU temp is at 74*c and GPU usage is at 99%. is this normal or is a fan not working somewhere. I haven't overclocked either.

More about : high gpu

March 9, 2012 6:26:30 AM

Hi,

Your video card is overclocked, well it's the overclock edition from MSI.

74 degrees, I wouldn't worry too much. If it hits 80 then I would start to get nervous.
March 9, 2012 6:34:41 AM

well it did peak at 82*c. ive got the core clock on 880 mhz
shader clock 1760 mhz
memory clock 2100
fan speed 43%

are these settings to high or is there a problem with my cooling?
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a c 84 U Graphics card
March 9, 2012 6:35:19 AM

that temperature is fine with that type of card.:) 
a c 84 U Graphics card
March 9, 2012 6:37:27 AM

increase fan speed to 55% to 60%
March 9, 2012 6:48:48 AM

increased the fan speed to 57% and after 5ins of playing SWTOR it went up to 86*. Is there a way to manually test the fans?
a c 84 U Graphics card
March 9, 2012 6:51:45 AM

did you have a good air flow on your case if no then open it and then try to play and check and tell me.
a b U Graphics card
March 9, 2012 6:51:57 AM

74c under full load like that is actually really cool. I have 2 of these in sli and they've hit over 95c in some cases. Max operating temp is 105c if i'm not mistaken, so your measly 74c is gravy :) 
March 9, 2012 7:02:40 AM

I have the Asus GTX 560 ti Directcu ii TOP overclocked.

Im getting full load at around 60 degrees celcius @ 900Mhz core clock
a c 84 U Graphics card
March 9, 2012 7:11:01 AM

mat2155 what settings did you apply tell him so that i think it would work with him
March 9, 2012 7:22:31 AM

sunnk said:
did you have a good air flow on your case if no then open it and then try to play and check and tell me.


running it with the side of and on the floor it was running at 65-72*c. with the side on it was around 75-86*c.
a c 84 U Graphics card
March 9, 2012 7:26:14 AM

so run it where it runs cool and one more thing that the max temp of gtx 560ti is 99c and the 86 is not a good sign.

and the temp are mostly depends on the game like in more gpu dependent games which uses more gpu in that games the gpu runs littlebit hotter.:) 
a c 291 U Graphics card
March 9, 2012 7:56:24 AM

Make the fan automatic. You'll get the best results.
March 9, 2012 8:20:57 AM

I have the same card and I have 65 max on the card. Usually it can stay on 60 under full load.

Suppose your airflow isn't the best. I have the side panel cooler sucking air into it. If you can, maybe try something like that
March 9, 2012 11:37:49 AM

Nightwish said:
increased the fan speed to 57% and after 5ins of playing SWTOR it went up to 86*. Is there a way to manually test the fans?


Using MSI Afterburner you can set up a fan curve to set up a sweet spot to let your GPU temperature top out at without your fan being too loud. It comes with Kombuster to stress your video card while u monitor the temperature. 74* Is perfectly fine. I don't like letting mine get above 80*, it tops out around 77* usually. Realistically it can go above 100* and be perfectly fine... just being above the boiling point scares me a little.

Here is a download to MSI Afterburner, which can also be used to OC the card, but it works just for fan and temperature monitoring as well. Just take a few minutes and get to know your way around the program.

MSI Afterburner: http://event.msi.com/vga/afterburner/download.htm
March 9, 2012 7:18:00 PM

After having a closer look in my case i think my problems is very poor cooling, its not a gamer case so everything is compacted in. The GFX and PSU fans are facing each other at about 5 inches apart, so there probably sucking in each others heat. and my case doesn't have front or rear fans. Im gonna get a fan for the back to suck the heat out if that doesn't work then its a new case.

Thank you all for your time and advice.
a c 291 U Graphics card
March 9, 2012 7:36:04 PM

Nightwish said:
After having a closer look in my case i think my problems is very poor cooling, its not a gamer case so everything is compacted in. The GFX and PSU fans are facing each other at about 5 inches apart, so there probably sucking in each others heat. and my case doesn't have front or rear fans. Im gonna get a fan for the back to suck the heat out if that doesn't work then its a new case.

Thank you all for your time and advice.


Wait a second, that cannot be. The PSU fan has to be pointed down! Hot air rises up, and if you try to suck it down it will only make the matters worse.
March 9, 2012 7:55:56 PM

Nightwish said:
After having a closer look in my case i think my problems is very poor cooling, its not a gamer case so everything is compacted in. The GFX and PSU fans are facing each other at about 5 inches apart, so there probably sucking in each others heat. and my case doesn't have front or rear fans. Im gonna get a fan for the back to suck the heat out if that doesn't work then its a new case.

Thank you all for your time and advice.


A case does help improve cooling, if you want to spend the money. But honestly you should be able to set the fan speed to a place where your card isnt overheating, and make sure you have cable management allowing airflow.
March 9, 2012 8:32:19 PM

Sunius said:
Wait a second, that cannot be. The PSU fan has to be pointed down! Hot air rises up, and if you try to suck it down it will only make the matters worse.



The PSU fan is pointed down but the GFX fans are pointed up at the PSU fan
a c 217 U Graphics card
March 9, 2012 9:05:27 PM

Sunius said:
Wait a second, that cannot be. The PSU fan has to be pointed down! Hot air rises up, and if you try to suck it down it will only make the matters worse.


The PSU fan generally only has 1 orientation that works for any given case. You don't get to choose. Top mounted PSU's generally have the fan down and on bottom mounted cases, the fan points up. In either case, the fan is sucking air in, and blows outside the case.
March 10, 2012 12:50:06 AM

sunnk said:
mat2155 what settings did you apply tell him so that i think it would work with him


The ASUS version (the one I have) has better cooling than the MSI GTX 560 ti.

So, my settings won't help him because my settings are even higher than what his are.
a c 84 U Graphics card
March 10, 2012 4:37:30 AM

matt2155 said:
The ASUS version (the one I have) has better cooling than the MSI GTX 560 ti.

So, my settings won't help him because my settings are even higher than what his are.


fine.:) 
a c 291 U Graphics card
March 10, 2012 8:29:48 AM

bystander said:
The PSU fan generally only has 1 orientation that works for any given case. You don't get to choose. Top mounted PSU's generally have the fan down and on bottom mounted cases, the fan points up. In either case, the fan is sucking air in, and blows outside the case.


You're wrong. They both have to be pointing down. @OP: How does the gpu fan point up :pt1cable: 

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/cooling-airflow-heatsink,...
a c 217 U Graphics card
March 10, 2012 2:00:21 PM

Sunius said:
You're wrong. They both have to be pointing down. @OP: How does the gpu fan point up :pt1cable: 

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/cooling-airflow-heatsink,...


That may be preferred, but most enclosures do not give you a choice. The screw hole alignments are fixed, and many do not have openings at the bottom for intake. If there is no opening for intake and you put the bottom mounted PSU with the fan faced down, you are likely going to cause your PSU to overheat.

What you can take from this is to buy a case that is designed to have the PSU intake at the bottom.
!