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BSOD after new hardware install

Last response: in Systems
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May 13, 2012 4:12:25 AM

Hello, I've recently run into some bsod while running games after installing some new hardwares.

These logs are the recent bsod's I've had,

Problem signature:
Problem Event Name: BlueScreen
OS Version: 6.1.7601.2.1.0.768.3
Locale ID: 1033

Additional information about the problem:
BCCode: a
BCP1: 0000000000000000
BCP2: 0000000000000002
BCP3: 0000000000000001
BCP4: FFFFF80002CD4A5C
OS Version: 6_1_7601
Service Pack: 1_0
Product: 768_1

Files that help describe the problem:
C:\Windows\Minidump\051212-38079-01.dmp
C:\Users\VDoom\AppData\Local\Temp\WER-50169-0.sysdata.xml

Read our privacy statement online:
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=104288&clcid=0x0...

If the online privacy statement is not available, please read our privacy statement offline:
C:\Windows\system32\en-US\erofflps.txt


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Problem signature:
Problem Event Name: BlueScreen
OS Version: 6.1.7601.2.1.0.768.3
Locale ID: 1033

Additional information about the problem:
BCCode: d1
BCP1: 0000000000000096
BCP2: 0000000000000002
BCP3: 0000000000000001
BCP4: FFFFF8800170379F
OS Version: 6_1_7601
Service Pack: 1_0
Product: 768_1

Files that help describe the problem:
C:\Windows\Minidump\051212-39327-01.dmp
C:\Users\VDoom\AppData\Local\Temp\WER-273984-0.sysdata.xml

Read our privacy statement online:
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=104288&clcid=0x0...

If the online privacy statement is not available, please read our privacy statement offline:
C:\Windows\system32\en-US\erofflps.txt


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Problem signature:
Problem Event Name: BlueScreen
OS Version: 6.1.7601.2.1.0.768.3
Locale ID: 1033

Additional information about the problem:
BCCode: 50
BCP1: FFFFFFFFFFFFFFE8
BCP2: 0000000000000000
BCP3: FFFFF880014337BB
BCP4: 0000000000000000
OS Version: 6_1_7601
Service Pack: 1_0
Product: 768_1

Files that help describe the problem:
C:\Windows\Minidump\051212-42385-01.dmp
C:\Users\VDoom\AppData\Local\Temp\WER-62072-0.sysdata.xml

Read our privacy statement online:
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=104288&clcid=0x0...

If the online privacy statement is not available, please read our privacy statement offline:
C:\Windows\system32\en-US\erofflps.txt

The last and most recent BSOD I had was during a blend prime95 test within 45 mins.



The specs of my pc is,

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c02...

HP P6510f
Windows 7 SP1
AMD Athlon II X4 630
12GB PC3-10600 Ram, 4GB from factory and 2 x 4GB from Cosair XM3
750GB,and 1TB at 7200rpm
XFX Radeon HD 6850
Seasonic M12II 520W PSU

Started happening after installing the Radeon HD6850, Corsair XM3 8GB, and the Seasonic 520W PSU.
It only occurs during gaming, however doing some research and running the prime95 on blend it didn't even last 45 mins before it BSOD again. I've ran the HP diagnostics and the Windows memory diagnostics, and it all came back without any issues.
The game I have most issues with is Starcraft II. On LOL (league of legends), I could go a couple 40 games without having it occur. I've manually updated the AMD drivers, but still having the same problems.

I've also used speccy to monitor the temp, and here's an average I got during normal operating.
CPU - high 40 to 50c
Mobo - mid 40s
GPU - 50s

I'm not an expert on pc's so I just searched and tried some methods but with no success, if anyone has a suggestion please help! Thanks.

More about : bsod hardware install

a c 136 B Homebuilt system
May 13, 2012 4:25:41 AM

is that win 7 64 bit ?

If its not then remove the RAM you added . Its doing nothing but taking space .
See if that solves the problem
May 13, 2012 4:30:35 AM

Sorry I forgot to state, it is running on 64bit.
Related resources
a c 136 B Homebuilt system
May 13, 2012 4:40:11 AM

Then still try removing the RAM and seing if the problem persists .

RAM timing and voltage issues are common causes of BSOD's . That will very simply confirm if its the problem
May 13, 2012 4:54:02 AM

Outlander_04 said:
Then still try removing the RAM and seing if the problem persists .

RAM timing and voltage issues are common causes of BSOD's . That will very simply confirm if its the problem


Here's CPU-Z reading of the voltage for Corsair & Factory,

Corsair:


Factory:


Speccy getting the timing from ram:



From my understanding, under neweggs specs for the Cosair XM3's the timing should be at 9-9-9-24, 1.5V – 1.65V. So the only thing I see off is the 8-8-8-20 I'm getting from Speccy, is that unusual? If so, can I just remove the factory RAM and keep the Corsairs and expect the timing to go where it should? Thanks!
a c 136 B Homebuilt system
May 13, 2012 5:20:40 AM

Take out the corsair RAM and see if the problem persists .

You cannot solve a problem without first identifying what that problem is
May 13, 2012 5:36:24 AM

Outlander_04 said:
Take out the corsair RAM and see if the problem persists .

You cannot solve a problem without first identifying what that problem is


Will do, after I removed the Corsair's the timing went back to 9-9-9-24 @ 666mhz compared to 8-8-8-20 @ 533mhz.
Here's a pic,



I will report back after running Starcraft II.
May 15, 2012 2:21:52 AM

Sorry for late report. Ever since I removed the ram it hasn't given me any problems, and I switch back to just the Corsairs and it hasn't caused a problem yet. The timing of them went back to 9-9-9-24. Is there a reason why the factory Micron Technology isn't compliant with the Corsairs? I don't have Ai tweaker in my BIOS, I don't know any other way to adjust the timing for them. Any suggestions? Thanks.
a c 136 B Homebuilt system
May 15, 2012 2:34:46 AM

Some motherboard chipsets run at a higher speed if only two RAM sticks are installed . If all 4 slots are full then it throttles back the RAM frequency . I assume this is to stop the controller over heating .

The BSOD will have been the result of voltages being too low , or timings being to tight [ low] .
You have isolated the problem so you may now be able to use all the RAM again if you can manually set the voltage and timing in BIOS .
Take note of what it is now , then install the rest of the RAM . Then manually set it .
It might not work , but it probably will
a b B Homebuilt system
May 15, 2012 2:42:18 AM

It sounds like you're using two different kinds of memory with mismatched timings. Yeah, that can cause problems. Most of the time the system will be smart enough to just downgrade the faster pair to match the slower pair ... except when it isn't.

With an HP machine, it's entirely possible that this is what's going on. More than likely it's a cheap motherboard with a BIOS only designed with specific HP factory configurations in mind, and apart from that, you're on your own. So it sees a type of unknown memory with timings and voltage that don't match the original pair, and everything gets all irfed up.

Also completely possible that it doesn't know how to compensate for having all four memory slots filled. Sometimes doing that means all four sticks will need a slight bump in voltage (maybe 0.02-0.04V) or you'll get these crashes. Some motherboards can handle that with their "auto" setting, some can't. And if that's your machine and if it's an HP, you're out of luck. I would actually say this is more likely than the timing problem.

The fact that it would crash during a Prime95 blend test really also points to the RAM as well. If you want, you could run memtest86+ to make sure you didn't get a bad stick in the new set. But your explanation is probably in one of the two scenarios above.
May 15, 2012 2:52:05 AM

capt_taco said:
It sounds like you're using two different kinds of memory with mismatched timings. Yeah, that can cause problems. Most of the time the system will be smart enough to just downgrade the faster pair to match the slower pair ... except when it isn't.

With an HP machine, it's entirely possible that this is what's going on. More than likely it's a cheap motherboard with a BIOS only designed with specific HP factory configurations in mind, and apart from that, you're on your own. So it sees a type of unknown memory with timings and voltage that don't match the original pair, and everything gets all irfed up.

Also completely possible that it doesn't know how to compensate for having all four memory slots filled. Sometimes doing that means all four sticks will need a slight bump in voltage (maybe 0.02-0.04V) or you'll get these crashes. Some motherboards can handle that with their "auto" setting, some can't. And if that's your machine and if it's an HP, you're out of luck. I would actually say this is more likely than the timing problem.

The fact that it would crash during a Prime95 blend test really also points to the RAM as well. If you want, you could run memtest86+ to make sure you didn't get a bad stick in the new set. But your explanation is probably in one of the two scenarios above.


Thanks for the advice. I was wondering if the timing were mismatched, how come when I switched back to the factory ram, it went back to 9-9-9-24 which the Corsairs were rated at? It seems to be a hassle just to get the factories to work, I think I'll settle for the Corsair 8GBs I'm currently running. I'll be running prime95 again then the memtest just to see how the corsairs are doing. If they were bad, what signs should I be looking for? They haven't failed from gaming for few hours since I took the factories out. Thanks again.
a b B Homebuilt system
May 15, 2012 2:54:41 AM

Well, if they're working in gaming and they weren't before, that's a good sign.

When you run Memtest, it basically goes through and tests each sector of the RAM and lets you know if it encounters any errors. Even one error is a sign that the stick has a problem. Ideally, you'll run multiple passes, and test only one stick at a time to eliminate any extra variables.
May 16, 2012 6:12:38 AM

capt_taco said:
Well, if they're working in gaming and they weren't before, that's a good sign.

When you run Memtest, it basically goes through and tests each sector of the RAM and lets you know if it encounters any errors. Even one error is a sign that the stick has a problem. Ideally, you'll run multiple passes, and test only one stick at a time to eliminate any extra variables.



After numerous hours of memtest and prime95, it withstood it without any issues. I guess I'll just have to settle with just the corsair 8gbs. Thanks for all the help! :D 
a b B Homebuilt system
May 16, 2012 6:41:15 AM

selcareh said:
After numerous hours of memtest and prime95, it withstood it without any issues. I guess I'll just have to settle with just the corsair 8gbs. Thanks for all the help! :D 


My honest guess would be that all four sticks of memory are OK, and the issue is that the motherboard can't handle the voltage for all four slots. You can probably pick up a few bucks by selling the old RAM off.

Did the timings and speed ever get back to anything like what they're supposed to be? DDR3 PC-10600 RAM ought to be running at 1333 MHz, and it sounds like it's running at about half of that.
May 18, 2012 3:27:59 AM

capt_taco said:
My honest guess would be that all four sticks of memory are OK, and the issue is that the motherboard can't handle the voltage for all four slots. You can probably pick up a few bucks by selling the old RAM off.

Did the timings and speed ever get back to anything like what they're supposed to be? DDR3 PC-10600 RAM ought to be running at 1333 MHz, and it sounds like it's running at about half of that.


With the Corsairs 2 x 4GBs I'm currently using, the timing of them is 9-9-9-24. DRAM frequency is around 666mhz. Is that normal? I assumed it was since it was at 533mhz before.

Here's a pic from CPU-Z,

!