Cpu for gaming rig?

looking to build a gaming rig in a few weeks.

last time i looked into parts 1366 just came out and was the shizznitt but that is like dinosoure crap now i guess so help me out.

is the 1155 ivy bridge i7 3770 a good gaming cpu or is there one better in the 300 dollar range give or take a few bucks.

and can it handle sli in like 2 or so years when i upgrade and prices of the gpu i buy now come down for a second one?
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  1. muddmonky said:
    looking to build a gaming rig in a few weeks.

    last time i looked into parts 1366 just came out and was the shizznitt but that is like dinosoure crap now i guess so help me out.

    is the 1155 ivy bridge i7 3770 a good gaming cpu or is there one better in the 300 dollar range give or take a few bucks.

    and can it handle sli in like 2 or so years when i upgrade and prices of the gpu i buy now come down for a second one?


    There is no need to get an I7 for gaming. You are paying 100 more dollars for hyperthreading and extra memory cache two things that games don't make use of right now. I would go with a Sandy Bridge I5 or Ivy Bridge I5, are you going to be overclocking?
  2. rds1220 said:
    There is no need to get an I7 for gaming. You are paying 100 more dollars for hyperthreading and extra memory cache two things that games don't make use of right now. I would go with a Sandy Bridge I5 or Ivy Bridge I5, are you going to be overclocking?

    +1

    If you're gaming and wanting to OC, i5-3570k is the way to go. However, if you're on a budget/don't need to OC, I would recommend an i5-3450.
  3. If he was going to be ovrclocking than I would go with the Sandy Bridges I5. With Ivy Bridges Intel decided to use thermal paste to “glue” the IHS to the CPU chip instead of fluxless solder. Because of this Ivy Bridges runs a little hotter than Sandy Bridges. The point is you can tweak just a little more out of Sandy Bridges CPU’s than Ivy Bridges.
  4. rds1220 said:
    If he was going to be ovrclocking than I would go with the Sandy Bridges I5. With Ivy Bridges Intel decided to use thermal paste to “glue” the IHS to the CPU chip instead of fluxless solder. Because of this Ivy Bridges runs a little hotter than Sandy Bridges. The point is you can tweak just a little more out of Sandy Bridges CPU’s than Ivy Bridges.


    True, however, this doesn't mean the i5 IB chips can't overclock well. I've seen on average a 4.6Ghz-4.7Ghz OC on the i5 3570k; the i7 3770k on the other hand, total different story :lol:
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