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XP will not install on new build

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May 15, 2012 3:00:49 PM

Hello, I put together a new build with all new components and want to dual boot Win7 & XP. I read that I’m supposed to install XP first. After the XP disk loads misc components, it fails to boot into Windows to start the installation. Blue screen, stop message that indicates virus or driver or HDD problem. I tried two brand new Hitachi 7000K 2TB HDDs. I tried SATA2 and SATA3 connectors. I tried a different, known reliable DVD drive. I tried a different XP OS disk (I have three from builds I did 8-10 years ago). I searched Microsoft support and Googled the issue: my problem might be XP(SP2) doesn't include SATA drivers? My MB is ASRock Z77 Extreme6, has no IDE connections but does have a floppy connection(!). I can go look in my garage for a floppy drive and floppy disks, test to see if they still work, and try this fix. Does anyone have any better ideas? Do I need to format the new HDDs before starting the installation? I thought that would be the first thing the XP installation would have me do (partition new HDD, quick format…), but it doesn’t get to that point before the BSOD. Thanks for all suggestions!

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May 15, 2012 3:19:08 PM

As a test for your hardware (since it's a new build, it could be a bad component somewhere), try installing windows 7 and see if it works (you don't need to activate it or anything, just make sure you can get to desktop).

If that works then you at least know XP is the problem. Early windows XP disks did not ship with large disk support (I believe they started in SP2). If this is the problem you can try partitioning up your XP drive with your windows 7 installer, or build a slipstream install disk with SP3. There may be other ways around the issue, try googling around a bit :) 

Alternatively, if you have windows 7 Professional or Ultimate, these versions ship with a license for XP to be run in a virtual machine, it's not as fast, but it may be sufficient for your needs. You can also use a program like virtual box to create a windows XP virtual machine with your windows XP install disk.

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May 15, 2012 3:24:53 PM

Not much help, I just got curious (famous last words) and rebooted my rig (i7 3770 / P8z77-V) with XP SP2... it loaded all the drivers, stalled for a few seconds, and blue-screened on me, heh.
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May 15, 2012 3:43:06 PM

Thanks pdxalex, that helps, it tells me it probably isn't a hardware problem.
Wolfshadw, I had seen slipstream advice in my "research", but was unsure. Due to your comment and link, I will try it tonight.
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May 15, 2012 3:47:04 PM

Don't know this will help.i posted a thread about this but got no response.
I found this in specification of the motherboards.May be there might be same for XP. i couldnt find it.

*6: Due to Intel® chipset limitation, P8Z77, P8H77 and P8B75 series motherboards do not support Windows® Vista operating system.


Here is the link: see the note section at the bottom of the page.

http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/I [...] ifications
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May 15, 2012 4:09:23 PM

djscribbles said:
As a test for your hardware (since it's a new build, it could be a bad component somewhere), try installing windows 7 and see if it works (you don't need to activate it or anything, just make sure you can get to desktop).

If that works then you at least know XP is the problem. Early windows XP disks did not ship with large disk support (I believe they started in SP2). If this is the problem you can try partitioning up your XP drive with your windows 7 installer, or build a slipstream install disk with SP3. There may be other ways around the issue, try googling around a bit :) 

Alternatively, if you have windows 7 Professional or Ultimate, these versions ship with a license for XP to be run in a virtual machine, it's not as fast, but it may be sufficient for your needs. You can also use a program like virtual box to create a windows XP virtual machine with your windows XP install disk.


Thanks Dj, good advice. I'll try slipstream of SP3. If that doesn't work, I'll give up and just install Win7. I don't have Professional or Ultimate. I planned to use the virtual XP feature of Win7, but bought the Home version before I discovered it didn't include that feature!
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May 16, 2012 1:50:19 PM

reader3800 said:
Thanks Dj, good advice. I'll try slipstream of SP3. If that doesn't work, I'll give up and just install Win7. I don't have Professional or Ultimate. I planned to use the virtual XP feature of Win7, but bought the Home version before I discovered it didn't include that feature!


You can use the copy of windows XP that you own and install it in a traditional virtual machine client like "Oracle VirtualBox" (which is free). It's basically the same as what would have come with Windows 7 ult/pro; the big difference is that the Ult/Pro versions actually give you a license for Windows XP (which is nice if you don't have a copy anymore), it still just runs Windows XP inside of a microsoft built VM.
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May 23, 2012 3:32:41 PM

Solved. Thanks Dj and Josh for the advice to slipstream SP3 into WinXP. I used nLite. But first I made some errors. Error #1: I installed WinXP (before I built the slipstream disk) using a floppy for the SATA drivers. It installed, but then would never restart. Error #2: I installed Win7, then finally got the slipstream disk working and installed WinXP. The dual boot doesn't work if you do it in this order (Win7 before XP). So I reinstalled Win7 without wiping the partition clean. Same result. I was very frustrated. Then I read that a clean reinstall required that I wipe the partition of all traces of Win7 first. Did it in command prompt window ("diskpart", I think), then installed Win7. Since the working XP was already in place, and Win7 thought it was installing for the first time, it all worked fine, and I get that nice black boot choice screen everytime I turn on the computer. Success! Error #3: I first tried to slipstream with ImgBurn, but it was too complicated for my low-tech mind. I then found nLite, a very nice program for building boot disks such as for slipstreaming SP3 into XP, but the various instructions I found were for earlier versions of nLite so I had to experiment and fail several times before I figured it out.
Conclusion: I am happy, and I learned a lot from the experience. If I did it all again, it would take probably an hour, instead of three days!
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