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How to bond two seperate DSL connections to create one faster internet

Last response: in Networking
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May 24, 2011 2:38:29 AM

Hello and I hope you are having a good day. I am trying to figure out if it is possible to combine two sepearate DSl modems and bond them to create one faster internet connection. I live in a place where I can only receive DSL from one provider (Windstream) and the fastest speed I can buy is 3mbps download and .5 mbps upload. I live between my father-in-law and my brother-in-law and both of them have their own sepearate internet connection.

I connect to my father-in-law via about a 330ft cat5e direct burial cable that is in the ground. I do acheive full connection speeds of 3mbps and .5mbps using this setup. I can also connect via wifi although if this was the chosen route for bonding I would need to buy an outdoor antenna (like the one below) to increase the signal.
http://www.amazon.com/Alfa-Hi-Gain-Omni-Directional-Out...

I can connect to my brother-in-laws internet via wifi although I would need to buy an outdoor antenna to acheive better signal.

My current hardware
Dir-655 with Rosewill 3x5dbi antenna attached (I use this antenna to get better signal outside to my metal storage building, I can get decent signal inside even with the storage building door shut using this setup)
I also have a couple Gigabyte switches and plenty of ethernet cable.
Father-in-law has a windstream modem with wifi. It is a 2wire 2701HG.
Brother-in-law has an identical winstream modem-2wire 2701HG.

What would I need to purhcase in order to bond these two internet connections to create one faster (hopefully 6/1mbps) internet connection?
I believe I would need a router with a dual WAN but am unsure which one to buy. Also where I would connect to my brother-in-law's internet I would need to buy a access point and outdoor antenna so I can send the signal to the 2 wan router, correct?

My father-in-law is about 300 feet away from where I would probably put an outdoor antenna although I could put the antenna on the otherside of my house and make it about 250 feet.
My brother-in-law is about 200 feet in the other direction away from me.
If my directions in my mind are correct my father in law is about due south of my house and my brother in law is about due west of my house.

Is this too much work to get involved in or way too complicated or too costly? I'm willing to spend a few hundred dollars on it but if it is going to cost alot I probably will just deal with it. I have a basic understanding of networking just not alot, but I would really like to get a faster internet connection due to the fact I work on computers from time to time and I download large files and would really like it to be faster.

I am not really too interested in setting up a sever unless it is necessary as I believe there is a router that can handle all that for me. However if this is necessary I already have a computer I can use plus I believe I can get access to windows sever installation and product key (I have a technet subscription).

After this setup I would probably send the bonded signal out so that both my father and brother in law could have access to faster internet. Any ideas on the best way to do this?

If I missed this and this has already been answered I'm sorry but I did not see anything that was a few years old and that completly answered my quesitons. Please also let me know any additional info that you may need. Thanks for your help, sjonesy.
December 9, 2011 7:46:03 PM

Hey sjonesy,

I noticed that nobody seemed to get back to you even though this post is a bit old. However, I've been doing some research and you actually can combine multiple Internet lines (eg including a cable modem) to make a faster and more reliable one. The Internet lines can be different technologies and can come from different providers, and it is not necessary to have special software (e.g. MLPPP) or hardware at the provider premises - they don't even have to know you are bonding their line to another (it is done at layer 4).

For example, you could bond together four ADSL lines at 6Mbps down/ 768k up to create a 24Mbps down/ 3Mbps up connection, even for a single file transfer or a streaming video source. This is a lot cheaper than a bonded T1 line.

I'm sure if you google search for "broadband bonding" you'll find what you're looking for.

Hope this helps your search.
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December 19, 2011 11:00:34 PM

Thanks for the reply, ztz. I actually researched it out and figured it was going to cost more than I was willing to attempt for something I was not 100% sure it would work. If I was 100% sure it would work I might be interested in doing it. I did talk to the Zyxel people and they said that the ISP would have to allow bonding also. The particular model I was asking about is the P663H-51 it is a zyxel adsl2+ bonded 4 port router, just going off my memory and a quick google search. The fastest internet I can get here is a adsl 3mbps down and .5mbps up (through windstream, this is really the only option I have here unless I went with satellite, I can not get cable where I live) and this is the only reason why I was considering doing anything.

I have researched broadband bonding and this led me to the zyxel, which from what I could tell and remember that was going to be the best option for me.

If you happen to know of a cheaper way or a way for sure that I would not have to contact the ISP I still would be interested. A particular model would be very handy or a general direction. The best I was able to come up with was the zyxel.

Thanks for you help and response, sjonesy2.
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Related resources
December 29, 2011 12:39:04 AM

flash619 said:
Check this out...
http://www.octopusplus.com/


Have you ever tried this yourself? Do you know anybody who has?
I looked at this website originally but it looks cheaply designed and not sure if it is for real or not and I ruled it out. I would be grateful to hear any actual experiences with it.
Thanks for the response, sjonesy
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January 10, 2012 3:47:31 PM

Hey sjonesy,

As far as a particular model/company that could handle bonding for you, I would highly recommend mushroom networks. I've had some great interaction with them as far as bonding and reliability of products. I have experienced bonding with their products without communication with the ISP and I have actually told some friends/clients about their services. For personal use, it might be a little more pricy, but I feel like you should still look into it. If you give them a call or email, I'm sure they could explain it much better than I can.

Hope this helps!
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January 12, 2012 8:47:39 PM

ztz said:
Hey sjonesy,

As far as a particular model/company that could handle bonding for you, I would highly recommend mushroom networks. I've had some great interaction with them as far as bonding and reliability of products. I have experienced bonding with their products without communication with the ISP and I have actually told some friends/clients about their services. For personal use, it might be a little more pricy, but I feel like you should still look into it. If you give them a call or email, I'm sure they could explain it much better than I can.

Hope this helps!



Thanks for the suggestion but I do remember looking at Mushroom networks and they were too pricy for just my little home set up. If it were a buisness or something I probably would consider it, but considering I would have to foot the cost myself I would like to go fairly cheaply if I could. If I do decide to spend the money then I will consider them. Thanks alot, sjonesy2
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March 20, 2012 9:57:18 PM

If you want to bond and not just load balance, check out http://ww.vUnity.com for bonded DSL options.

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January 19, 2013 5:33:19 AM

"ADSL bonding" is a term, not just a combination of words. In order to bond two ADSL (or any other type of DSL) lines, yes, your provider must enable that feature for both of your lines. And not all providers have the service, and hopefully your lines are from the same provider. If not, then it is impossible.
Other thing: you can join your networks, connect the LAN ports of two ADSL modems to the same WAN combining router, for example SonicWall, but those devices are expensive, starting from $300. And remember, if you use WAN combining routers, e.g. "TP-LINK TL-R480T", your Internet connections MUST be from different providers.
My advice, as a telecommunications engineer, get another line from another provider if your provider cannot provide more than you get now.
Funny thing: on eHow.com I found this line for bonding DSL: "For DSL bonding to occur, the provider must be running PPPoE" - really funny :) 
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January 24, 2013 1:44:46 AM

Try Windows Server 2012 I believe any edition has it, but double check. 2012 has somethign called TEAMING. In Teaming you can connect upto 36 different connections and windows will internally turn the adapters into a single TEAM and aggregate the bandwidth between them.

I am using 2012 DataCenter edition with a similar setup and everything was working. I say was because I have been messing with everything and tweaking the crap out it before I reinstall and set everything exactly as I want.

Both my internet connections are via cable modem and it worked just fine.

http://blogs.technet.com/b/privatecloud/archive/2012/06...


NIC teaming, also known as Load Balancing/Failover (LBFO), allows multiple network adapters to be placed into a team for the purposes of bandwidth aggregation, and/or traffic failover to maintain connectivity in the event of a network component failure. This guide describes how to deploy and manage NIC Teaming with Windows Server 2012.

http://www.microsoft.com/en-hk/download/details.aspx?id...

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March 30, 2013 3:41:41 PM

Look up dual wan routers. it wont "combine" for faster speeds, but will distribute the requests across the two connections (but you may get speed increases on single files if you configure your download managers to do sections). it seems to be the simplest way to go about it.

I havnt done it so i cant say what devices will work. So im not sure if ones with the external WAN port will combine with the internal DSL WAN port. The ones that advertise 3G connectivity seem to be failsafe ones.

more to research:
aggregate bandwidth
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_Load_Balancing
"Road Runner Guide to the Internet", "simple round-robin load equalization", et al (for dd-wrt)

You may experience problems with torrents (trackers tracking one IP address) and newsgroups allowing a connection from one IP address (probably a fix to the router firmware to use one connection for that domain/port could fix that)
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