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File System

Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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January 2, 2002 8:45:41 AM

HI there, hope this hasnt been asked before, i did make an effort to find a previous post.

What i want to know is what is the best file system to install Linux on, FAT32 or the Linux file system (forget the name). I want to dual boot of one disk with Win98 and Linux. From what i understand if i use the Linux file system i can still access files in Fat32 from Linux but will i be able to move a file from Win98 Fat32 to the Linux partition if it isnt Fat32. etc etc.

Also what i would like to know is, is there a speed diff. when it comes to the 2 file systems when running Linux on them, faster is better......

Thanks Ahead.

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Anonymous
January 3, 2002 3:12:05 AM

Which distribution are you using? This will affect the choices available for the Linux fs.

I've been using reiserfs for some time and it seems to work great. I think ext2 (the default linux fs) has seen it's day, with the newer journalling fs available. ext3 looks good, but i've not tried it. SGI's XFS should be good, but I've never been able to get it working 100% reliably.

You can move a file from FAT32 to Linux no problem using Linux, but not from within Win98, unless you use FAT32 or UMSDOS for the Linux fs. My understanding is that UMSDOS is slower than the Linux fs.

I would go with one of the Linux filesystems.
January 3, 2002 9:31:13 AM

I'll use RedHat7.2. i have used 7 before but i didnt see any other options than Fat and ext2. Is there more availible in 7.2?
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January 3, 2002 2:00:36 PM

Well if you go with Redhat 7.2 then you will use the new ext3 file system. You can't install Linux on a fat32 partition. The best thing to do is install win98 on fat32 partition but leave at least 5GB's free for Linux. When I installed Redhat from the 2 downloaded ISO's I needed at least 3 GB's for the entire install. It has to be free space and not formatted in a windows file system. Once you start the redhat cd you can then have it setup your partitions for Linux. It will create 3 partitions. Boot, EXT3 and swap. And like the previous post you can move files from Windows to Linux and vice versa with no problems at all. Not sure about the speed difference. I did see an increase in speed for Quake3 under Linux.

Are you the friend who works on computers? :cool:
January 4, 2002 8:23:36 AM

A while ago I had probs on my linux router and wiped it, during the install I chose to keep fat and it ran very slow compared to when it was installed onto an ext2 partition. bear in mind though this is a P60 with 48 meg of ram, on a fast system it probably wont be (as) noticable but I certainly noticed it.


Next time you wave - use all your fingers
January 4, 2002 3:37:31 PM

Journalized File Systems are definately the way to go.
I have tried reiserfs, ext3, and xfs. I thought that xfs was propbably the fastest, but it had trouble booting with LILO, being declared as the root partition. ext3 was probabl next fastest, and reiserfs was probably the slowest.

"If you teach a child to read, then he or her will be able to pass a literacy test" - George W.
January 4, 2002 8:27:36 PM

OK, so it looks like its going in the ext3 direction for Linux and Fat32 for Winbloted

All i need now is my new HD to install it all on.

Thanks for the advice guys.
!