Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

'mini clean room' to change lenses in dusty environments

Tags:
Last response: in Digital Camera
Share
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 2:05:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

http://tinyurl.com/d55ba

Kinetronics has a plastic bag that inflates but allows you to put your arms
in it with your camera to change lenses. Looks like they use those blowers
for air mattresses but with "a special dual air filter system." Not now on
sale, unfortunately: "Available Early Fall 2005."

I'm going by the photos, and it looks like you leave the blower on while
changing lenses to keep the bag inflated (it has to leak like a sieve
around your arms), but this keeps the interior in an overpressure
situation, preventing dust from coming in, I'd expect. Not a bad idea, but
of course, you have to keep the interior of the bag free of dust between
lens changes. :-> Not always easy at Burning Man, for example.

Something like this could be rigged with those clear plastic storage bags
and an air mattress pump. Just have to figure a way to filter the dust
without straining the motor to the point of exhaustion.
--
Phil Stripling | email to the replyto address is presumed
The Civilized Explorer | spam and read later. email from this URL
http://www.cieux.com/ | http://www.civex.com/ is read daily.
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 2:52:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Phil Stripling wrote:

> http://tinyurl.com/d55ba

tinyurl.com had a (brief) purpose a few years ago. But these days, the
internet is not as friendly as it was, and only the clueless click on
them as one never knows where they will end up.

> Kinetronics has a plastic bag that inflates but allows you to put your arms
> in it with your camera to change lenses.

Fools and their money, etc.
July 7, 2005 7:05:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

eawckyegcy@yahoo.com wrote:

> Phil Stripling wrote:
>
>> http://tinyurl.com/d55ba
>
> tinyurl.com had a (brief) purpose a few years ago. But these days, the
> internet is not as friendly as it was, and only the clueless click on
> them as one never knows where they will end up.
>

Only the TOTALLY clueless use an OS or a web browser that can get attacked
by simply clicking on a web link or opening an e-mail.
--

Stacey
Related resources
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 7:05:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> >> http://tinyurl.com/d55ba
> >
> > tinyurl.com had a (brief) purpose a few years ago. But these days, the
> > internet is not as friendly as it was, and only the clueless click on
> > them as one never knows where they will end up.
> >
>
> Only the TOTALLY clueless use an OS or a web browser that can get
attacked
> by simply clicking on a web link or opening an e-mail.

Even if they use a more secure OS and application, that doesn't make them
immune to being redirected to, say, the "goatce" picture, and *most* people
don't really care to see that.

steve
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 10:15:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Phil Stripling <phil_stripling@cieux.zzn.com> writes:

>Something like this could be rigged with those clear plastic storage bags
>and an air mattress pump. Just have to figure a way to filter the dust
>without straining the motor to the point of exhaustion.

Look at the filters used on industrial respirators worn by people
working in dusty areas. The N100 rated filters capture all particles
down to some extremely small size (they're rated for use by people
handling asbestos) yet they don't restrict breathing significantly.
One or two of those should allow enough airflow to inflate a bag.

Different manufacturers provide different systems to mount the filters
on the mask, but some of them use a relatively small diameter interface
that shouldn't be too difficult to adapt to plastic plumbing fittings.

Another idea: just use the air you exhale to inflate the bag. It's high
in humidity, so not a good idea if the camera is cold. But it *is*
clean, having already been filtered by your lungs.

Dave
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 10:15:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

davem@cs.ubc.ca (Dave Martindale) wrote:

> Another idea: just use the air you exhale to inflate the bag.
> It's high in humidity, so not a good idea if the camera is cold.
> But it *is* clean, having already been filtered by your lungs.

Did you ever smell the exhalation of someone who has smoked in the last
five minutes or so? The lungs do not filter the air. Sure, some
particulate matter may stick to the lining of your lungs, until you
cough up crud, but it's still far from filtered air.

Guy
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 10:15:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

davem@cs.ubc.ca (Dave Martindale) writes:

> Another idea: just use the air you exhale to inflate the bag. It's high
> in humidity, so not a good idea if the camera is cold. But it *is*
> clean, having already been filtered by your lungs.

That's a thought. The issue seems to me to be keeping the air flowing to
keep the bag inflated as air leaks out around your arms and to maintain the
overpressure in the bag that keeps dust from drifting in as you move around
in the bag, making it bellow. :-> Maybe a bagpipe?

--
Phil Stripling | email to the replyto address is presumed
The Civilized Explorer | spam and read later. email from this URL
http://www.cieux.com/ | http://www.civex.com/ is read daily.
July 8, 2005 5:26:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> five minutes or so? The lungs do not filter the air. Sure, some
> particulate matter may stick to the lining of your lungs, until you
> cough up crud, but it's still far from filtered air.

It is filtered, but you are on the dirty side of the filter, not the
clean side. Therefore, you are smelling dirty air.

I could look at the lining of my shop vac and claim the same thing, yet
the air jet out the top is relatively clean.
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 10:47:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Phil Stripling <phil_stripling@cieux.zzn.com> writes:

>That's a thought. The issue seems to me to be keeping the air flowing to
>keep the bag inflated as air leaks out around your arms and to maintain the
>overpressure in the bag that keeps dust from drifting in as you move around
>in the bag, making it bellow. :-> Maybe a bagpipe?

I can just see the TV commercial: Its a changing bag! It's a bagpipe!
It's both! Just 30 payments of $14.95 each from K-Tel! Operators are
standing by.

Dave
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 12:47:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Phil Stripling <phil_stripling@cieux.zzn.com> wrote:
: davem@cs.ubc.ca (Dave Martindale) writes:

: > Another idea: just use the air you exhale to inflate the bag. It's high
: > in humidity, so not a good idea if the camera is cold. But it *is*
: > clean, having already been filtered by your lungs.

: That's a thought. The issue seems to me to be keeping the air flowing to
: keep the bag inflated as air leaks out around your arms and to maintain the
: overpressure in the bag that keeps dust from drifting in as you move around
: in the bag, making it bellow. :-> Maybe a bagpipe?

I can see a way around this. Use a large ziplock bag, place the lens and
the camera in the bag, and seal it closed. Then manipulate the lenses and
camera body through the bag material. When everything is sealed up again,
you can unseal the bag and remove all the pieces. And as a side benefit,
you can carry several new sealed bags in your kit, and when one bag
becomes damaged or contaminated, you can simply discard it for a new one.

I just thought of one more use, it can be used as an inexpensive rain
cover. In fact, if you cut or tear a hole in one side, just large enough
for the end of your lens, and a rubber band to seal the bag around the
barrel of the lens. Now you can use the camera in fairly wet situations
without damaging the camera. The only part of the camera exposed to the
elements is the front element of the lens, and if you are like many of us,
this will be a UV/haze (or similar) filter. :) 

A large box of 5 to 10 gal, clear ziplock bags has to be much less
expansive than any manufactured product. And without pumps and filters it
has to be more portable.

Randy

==========
Randy Berbaum
Champaign, IL
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 12:47:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Randy Berbaum" <rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org> wrote in message
news:D alei6$erk$1@wildfire.prairienet.org...
> Phil Stripling <phil_stripling@cieux.zzn.com> wrote:
> : davem@cs.ubc.ca (Dave Martindale) writes:
>
> : > Another idea: just use the air you exhale to inflate the bag. It's
> high
> : > in humidity, so not a good idea if the camera is cold. But it *is*
> : > clean, having already been filtered by your lungs.
>
> : That's a thought. The issue seems to me to be keeping the air flowing to
> : keep the bag inflated as air leaks out around your arms and to maintain
> the
> : overpressure in the bag that keeps dust from drifting in as you move
> around
> : in the bag, making it bellow. :-> Maybe a bagpipe?
>
> I can see a way around this. Use a large ziplock bag, place the lens and
> the camera in the bag, and seal it closed. Then manipulate the lenses and
> camera body through the bag material. When everything is sealed up again,
> you can unseal the bag and remove all the pieces. And as a side benefit,
> you can carry several new sealed bags in your kit, and when one bag
> becomes damaged or contaminated, you can simply discard it for a new one.

I don't think that works, because dust-contaminated air flies right into the
bag as you're opening it.
The key to the OP's bag is the filter, which continually **replaces** the
dirty air that enters the bag with filtered air.
Any other time you open a plain bag, it fills with whatever dirty air you
are surrounded by. Sensor dust problems come mainly from particles that are
suspended in air, rather than just falling crud (which can of course be a
problem for careless folk...). And...falling crud will fall into the bag
surface...which then gets moved around as you manipulate the bag. -You're
hose again... :( 

> I just thought of one more use, it can be used as an inexpensive rain
> cover. In fact, if you cut or tear a hole in one side, just large enough
> for the end of your lens, and a rubber band to seal the bag around the
> barrel of the lens. Now you can use the camera in fairly wet situations
> without damaging the camera. The only part of the camera exposed to the
> elements is the front element of the lens, and if you are like many of us,
> this will be a UV/haze (or similar) filter. :) 

I find that the most effective cheapy device for this is the kind of duty
are the free shower caps you find in many hotel rooms. They are usually
thin, clear plastic, with an elastic opening, and they just happen to the
perfect size for a DSLR and normal lens/medium extension zoom. The fact
that they are so thin (and a bit loose) means you can not only see your
controls through it but you can also manipulate those controls right through
it as well. Best of all, they compact into the tiny little match-book-size
box you find them in, which means you can always have it in your bag. It's
saved my camera many times...
:) 

> A large box of 5 to 10 gal, clear ziplock bags has to be much less
> expansive than any manufactured product. And without pumps and filters it
> has to be more portable.

It would be quite portable...just not effective.

But don't throw out the zip-lock idea yet...since they are great to have on
hand for times where you have to take your camera inside a warm room from a
cold exterior. It prevents condensation on internal parts while your camera
warms to the inside temperature.
:) 

-Mark
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 2:32:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <3qslyqlf6t.fsf@shell4.tdl.com>,
Phil Stripling <phil_stripling@cieux.zzn.com> wrote:
>http://tinyurl.com/d55ba
>
>Kinetronics has a plastic bag that inflates but allows you to put your arms
>in it with your camera to change lenses. Looks like they use those blowers
>for air mattresses but with "a special dual air filter system." Not now on
>sale, unfortunately: "Available Early Fall 2005."

Hmm, wonder if that would help with the dust problem when loading large
format film.
Anonymous
July 9, 2005 12:15:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <3qslyqlf6t.fsf@shell4.tdl.com>,
Phil Stripling <phil_stripling@cieux.zzn.com> wrote:

> http://tinyurl.com/d55ba
>
> Kinetronics has a plastic bag that inflates but allows you to put your arms
> in it with your camera to change lenses. Looks like they use those blowers
> for air mattresses but with "a special dual air filter system." Not now on
> sale, unfortunately: "Available Early Fall 2005."
>
> I'm going by the photos, and it looks like you leave the blower on while
> changing lenses to keep the bag inflated (it has to leak like a sieve
> around your arms), but this keeps the interior in an overpressure
> situation, preventing dust from coming in, I'd expect. Not a bad idea, but
> of course, you have to keep the interior of the bag free of dust between
> lens changes. :-> Not always easy at Burning Man, for example.
>
> Something like this could be rigged with those clear plastic storage bags
> and an air mattress pump. Just have to figure a way to filter the dust
> without straining the motor to the point of exhaustion.

A pillow bag, mattress pump, and filter for $90? Bite me.
Anonymous
July 9, 2005 10:54:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Kevin McMurtrie <mcmurtri@dslextreme.com> writes:

> A pillow bag, mattress pump, and filter for $90? Bite me.

I think we've got an article for Make Magazine!
--
Phil Stripling | email to the replyto address is presumed
The Civilized Explorer | spam and read later. email from this URL
http://www.cieux.com/ | http://www.civex.com/ is read daily.
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 1:50:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 07 Jul 2005 10:05:30 -0700, Phil Stripling
<phil_stripling@cieux.zzn.com> wrote:

Not a bad idea, but
>of course, you have to keep the interior of the bag free of dust between
>lens changes. :-> Not always easy at Burning Man, for example.

Large potato chip bag clips on the cufs of the bag?
!