Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

What is better

Tags:
  • CPUs
  • Core
  • Intel
  • Product
Last response: in CPUs
Share
September 4, 2012 5:29:55 AM

1. Intel BX80637I33220 Core i3-3220 Processor
2. Intel Core i3-2120 Sandy Bridge

I was wondering which one should i get? which one is better?

More about : question

a c 283 à CPUs
a b å Intel
September 4, 2012 5:38:56 AM

Since they're the exact same speed otherwise, but Ivy Bridge is around 5% faster, the 3220.

As far as which one you should actually get, it doesn't really matter. The Ivy i3's don't really bring much more to the table than the Sandy i3's did (5% faster overall and a faster iGPU, but no PCIe 3.0).
m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b å Intel
September 4, 2012 5:52:29 AM

Yeah, that board will be fine with a 2120, and 1600 RAM will be fine, as well (a 2500K only officially supports up to 1333 RAM too, but as you can see, I'm using 1600 RAM as I type).
m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b å Intel
September 4, 2012 6:15:51 AM

If you're talking about the RAM, it'll default to 1333 when first installed, but you'll just need to enable the X.M.P. profile (or set the timings and speed manually) and you'll be good to go.
m
0
l
September 4, 2012 6:16:20 AM

Oh ok cool will I have to do anything to make it work
m
0
l
September 4, 2012 6:31:35 AM

Lol sorry to ask but how do I do that
m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b å Intel
September 4, 2012 6:35:08 AM

In the OC Tweaker section of the BIOS, go to DRAM Timing Configuration -> Load XMP Setting and select Profile 1.
m
0
l
September 4, 2012 6:49:25 AM

And after changing what will it help do like make it quicker?
m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b å Intel
September 4, 2012 6:56:35 AM

Honestly, it'll be slightly faster, but I doubt you would notice it unless you benchmarked it (it's not like the difference from 1066 to 1600 would be). But if you're gonna have 1600 RAM, you might as well use it that way.
m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b å Intel
September 4, 2012 7:04:17 AM

Looks good, but you don't really need the V6 GT, since you can't OC a 2120 (or any SB or IB i3) anyway (well, you can by like 100Mhz, but 100Mhz isn't enough to need an aftermarket cooler).
m
0
l
September 4, 2012 7:42:01 AM

Seems to me that the main difference in performance between sandy and ivy clock for
clock is based on the small increase afforded to ivy by its memory controller supporting
ddr3 1600 vs sandy with ddr3 1333 support. If you are getting a z75 mobo and ddr3
1600, you should go ivy(gets you 5%+ extra performance over sandy versus a less than
5% increase in price ie 130 over 125).

The other poster is running ddr3 1600 ram with a sandy bridge i5, but they don't say it
is running at 1600 speed. That 1600 ram is most likely running in 1333 mode.

And yeah, you can totally just use the intel boxed cooler with the i3. Since i3s have no
turbo and raising the base clock from 100mhz by more than a few mhz can create
havok for other components, you won't be overclocking and do not need an aftermarket
heatsink fan.

m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b å Intel
September 4, 2012 7:52:02 AM

jtenorj said:
The other poster is running ddr3 1600 ram with a sandy bridge i5, but they don't say it
is running at 1600 speed. That 1600 ram is most likely running in 1333 mode..


Not true. Check my CPU-Z Validation.
m
0
l
September 4, 2012 8:35:40 AM

So which i3 do you two reccomend
m
0
l
September 4, 2012 11:22:32 AM

DJDeCiBeL said:
Not true. Check my CPU-Z Validation.


I don't understand. If the sandy bridge i5 2500k's integrated memory controller only
supports memory speeds of up to 1333mhz, how can your ddr3 1600 be running at
1600? Is it not a hardware limitation but something that can be upgraded via a
microcode update in a new mobo bios or something?

Or wait! maybe it is because you have an unlocked k series processor with more
memory options? Like the i7 920 only supporting up to ddr3 1066 vs. an i7 965x with
higher memory multiplier options? If that is the case, then maybe you can run your
ram at 1600 on your i5 2500k but the OP may not be able to run their ram faster
than 1333 on a i3 2120? And didn't you say that i3 3220 was better(somewhat
small increase in performance worth the even smaller increase in price)?

Maybe it may be worth it to the OP to just spend 5 bucks more to get the
guaranteed performance increase from the ram. not like it makes sense to
drop the ram from 1600 to 1333(they are both dirt cheap).

mikeyboyy, I would get the i3 3220 if I were you.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_Intel_graphi...
According to wikipedia, the i3 3220's igp is actually slower than the igp in
i3 2120(both start at 650mhz, but the i3 2120 boosts up to 1250 while the
i3 3220 boosts up to only 1150 and both have 6 functional units). This is not
a big deal if you plan to use a more powerful pci express graphics card. It is
not a big difference if you use the igp, but the i3 2120 is a little faster.

Actually, the lower memory bandwidth on the i3 2120 might bottleneck any
performance increase compared to i3 3220/ the i3 3220 igp may not be fast
enough to make full use of the 1600mhz memory, so performance on that
standpoint is likely a wash.

However, if you plan to transcode any video(like taking dvds, blu rays or
captured internet flash video and convert it to a smaller resolution and/or
a different wrapper so you can play it back on a smaller mobile screen like
a phone or media player)the version of quicksync in the ivy bridge i3 will get
the job done much faster that the older quicksync version in the sandy i3.

So basically, the i3 3220 is a better value for the money than i3 2120.
m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b å Intel
September 4, 2012 1:46:32 PM

jtenorj said:
I don't understand. If the sandy bridge i5 2500k's integrated memory controller only
supports memory speeds of up to 1333mhz, how can your ddr3 1600 be running at
1600? Is it not a hardware limitation but something that can be upgraded via a
microcode update in a new mobo bios or something?


Because it's not a a CPU based limitation.

If the motherboard supports it, it'll work. You can use any speed RAM you want as long as the board will let you.

@mikeyboyy You can go with whichever one you want, but I promise you that 1600 RAM will work with the 2120 because that board supports it (and much faster as well).

My honest opinion is as I said before, the 3220 doesn't add much. Yes, it's ~5% faster and Quick Sync may be faster, but those two things alone don't make it so much better than a 2120 to make it a "no-brainer" buy. The only thing in it's favor, as far as I'm concerned, is the fact that the 3220 is newer. Not that that means much in this case.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
September 4, 2012 3:02:16 PM

As long as the Ivy chip isn't significantly more expensive I'd get it.
m
0
l
September 4, 2012 6:35:21 PM

DJDeCiBeL said:
Because it's not a a CPU based limitation.

If the motherboard supports it, it'll work. You can use any speed RAM you want as long as the board will let you.

@mikeyboyy You can go with whichever one you want, but I promise you that 1600 RAM will work with the 2120 because that board supports it (and much faster as well).

Did you read my entire post?

Can you back that up with a link to some evidence of a sandy i3 running ram at 1600?

The motherboard may support higher speeds, but only if the processor supports them
as well. That is why on z7x mobos(ideally mated with ivy bridge processors) you see
1600 and below as normal and above 1600 as oc(like with a k processor). Again, the
default max speed with sandy's internal memory controller is 1333 while a k series
sandy will let you go higher. Ivy memory controllers have a default max speed of 1600
with higher speeds available on OC capable k series i5 or i7 chips. Prove me wrong.

@OP:
As for quicksync, i looked up a couple performance comparisons in reviews both here
and at anandtech. It seems that internal plumbing tweaks in ivy's EUs(graphic cores)
generally push performance higher than expected vs sandy based on number of units
and clockspeed alone. It would also appear that the amount of performance difference
is also based on what software you use to transcode.
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ivy-bridge-benchmar...
http://www.anandtech.com/show/5626/ivy-bridge-preview-c...
http://www.anandtech.com/show/5771/the-intel-ivy-bridge...
http://www.anandtech.com/show/5871/intel-core-i5-3470-r...
Still, given the 5%+ boost clock per clock going from sandy to ivy versus the less than
5% cost increase(sandy @125, ivy @130), you might as well go with ivy. This is
especially true if you will use transcode software that will make the most use of ivy's
refined graphics pipelines.
m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b å Intel
September 4, 2012 6:45:17 PM

jtenorj said:
Did you read my entire post?

Can you back that up with a link to some evidence of a sandy i3 running ram at 1600?

The motherboard may support higher speeds, but only if the processor supports them
as well. That is why on z7x mobos(ideally mated with ivy bridge processors) you see
1600 and below as normal and above 1600 as oc(like with a k processor). Again, the
default max speed with sandy's internal memory controller is 1333 while a k series
sandy will let you go higher. Ivy memory controllers have a default max speed of 1600
with higher speeds available on OC capable k series i5 or i7 chips. Prove me wrong.


http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/334423-28-core-2120-d...

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/342611-31-2120-ddr3-1...

http://www.3dgameman.com/forum/hardware/core-i3-ddr-160...



Unless those people are crazy (like you apparently think I am), it'll work just fine.

Besides those, I'm positive that I've seen people here on Tom's that run 1600 RAM with their i3's. Since he's using a Z75 board (that you can OC the RAM with) it'll work.

Also, having a "K" CPU has nothing to do with it. Literally all that means is that the multiplier of the CPU itself is unlocked. It doesn't change anything else.
m
0
l
September 4, 2012 7:02:34 PM

DJDeCiBeL said:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/334423-28-core-2120-d...

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/342611-31-2120-ddr3-1...

http://www.3dgameman.com/forum/hardware/core-i3-ddr-160...



Unless those people are crazy (like you apparently think I am), it'll work just fine.

Besides those, I'm positive that I've seen people here on Tom's that run 1600 RAM with their i3's. Since he's using a Z75 board (that you can OC the RAM with) it'll work.

Also, having a "K" CPU has nothing to do with it. Literally all that means is that the multiplier of the CPU itself is unlocked. It doesn't change anything else.


Again, no hard evidence. Your links and the posts in them mean nothing to me.
m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b å Intel
September 4, 2012 7:06:18 PM

jtenorj said:
Again, no hard evidence. Your links and the posts in them mean nothing to me.


OK, believe what you want. It doesn't affect you anyway, but I know I'm right here...
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
September 4, 2012 7:10:30 PM

The memory can run at whatever arbitrary speeds the motherboard supports. Intel's guarantee only applies to 1333 MHz 1.5 V.
m
0
l
!