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Help! Need to resize jpeg dimensions for screen & printer

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Anonymous
July 7, 2005 11:00:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,comp.compression,alt.graphics.photoshop (More info?)

Hi you specialists, I have used PCs for years but am a newbie when it
comes to resizing jpegs. I'd welcome some help in understanding how
to compress and resize a jpeg so it can be sent by email to be viewed
and printed easily by everyone.

My worry is that some email programs may open a jpeg automatically
and I guess it's possible that the software may not have the
capability to shrink jpegs which have been created to display at a
large size.

I suspect the result could be an extreme close up of some detail in
the picture. With a limited email application I suspect it's even
possible the user may not be able to zoom out!

In this case the jpeg may get printed out to 8" x 10".

----

This is my case: I started with a photo taken by a photographer on
his digital camera. This is the data for that photo:

Size: 1960 x 3008 Pixels (5.90 MPixels)
Print Size: 69.1 x 106.1 cm; 27.2 x 41.8 inches
Original Colors: 16.7 Millions (24 BitsPerPixel)
File Size: 944.30 KB (966,959 Bytes)
Uncompressed Size 16.9 MB
Compression Ratio: 18.3

The print size looks huge. At 944 KB it is a little too big to send
by email so I compressed it down to 299.7 KB by saving it in ACDsee
and applying some compression.

The weird thing to me is that the Size (above) and Print Size have
stayed the same although the Compression Ratio is now 57.6.

Is this jpeg still going to display on a screen and print on a
printer as if it were 27 x 42 inches?

What do I need to do? I have access to both PhotoShop or Paint Shop
Pro.

Sue
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 11:00:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,comp.compression,alt.graphics.photoshop (More info?)

"Susan P" <Susan_P@nomail.com> wrote in message
news:968CC14F75B2272A58@204.153.244.156...
> Hi you specialists, I have used PCs for years but am a newbie when it
> comes to resizing jpegs. I'd welcome some help in understanding how
> to compress and resize a jpeg so it can be sent by email to be viewed
> and printed easily by everyone.
>
> My worry is that some email programs may open a jpeg automatically
> and I guess it's possible that the software may not have the
> capability to shrink jpegs which have been created to display at a
> large size.
>
> I suspect the result could be an extreme close up of some detail in
> the picture. With a limited email application I suspect it's even
> possible the user may not be able to zoom out!
>
> In this case the jpeg may get printed out to 8" x 10".
>
> ----
>
> This is my case: I started with a photo taken by a photographer on
> his digital camera. This is the data for that photo:
>
> Size: 1960 x 3008 Pixels (5.90 MPixels)
> Print Size: 69.1 x 106.1 cm; 27.2 x 41.8 inches
> Original Colors: 16.7 Millions (24 BitsPerPixel)
> File Size: 944.30 KB (966,959 Bytes)
> Uncompressed Size 16.9 MB
> Compression Ratio: 18.3
>
> The print size looks huge. At 944 KB it is a little too big to send
> by email so I compressed it down to 299.7 KB by saving it in ACDsee
> and applying some compression.
>
> The weird thing to me is that the Size (above) and Print Size have
> stayed the same although the Compression Ratio is now 57.6.
>
> Is this jpeg still going to display on a screen and print on a
> printer as if it were 27 x 42 inches?
>
> What do I need to do? I have access to both PhotoShop or Paint Shop
> Pro.
>
> Sue


Either one will do.

For emailing, re size the image to 800 or less pixels wide (this depends on
how large you want it displayed on the screen) and save it as a .jpg

Print via the 1960 x 3008 original file. It will be a stretch to get a 24 X
42 inch print out of a 1960 X 3008 image. In photo shop set your document
size to 80dpi to achieve 24 X 42 (or set the width to 24" and PS will do the
rest) Try cahnging the Doc with resample on and off and see which print you
like best..

Good luck
July 7, 2005 11:00:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,comp.compression,alt.graphics.photoshop (More info?)

Hi Sue. i use a program call irfan view is free and works for me.
http://www.irfanview.com/

Vince


"Susan P" <Susan_P@nomail.com> wrote in message
news:968CC14F75B2272A58@204.153.244.156...
Hi you specialists, I have used PCs for years but am a newbie when it
comes to resizing jpegs. I'd welcome some help in understanding how
to compress and resize a jpeg so it can be sent by email to be viewed
and printed easily by everyone.

My worry is that some email programs may open a jpeg automatically
and I guess it's possible that the software may not have the
capability to shrink jpegs which have been created to display at a
large size.

I suspect the result could be an extreme close up of some detail in
the picture. With a limited email application I suspect it's even
possible the user may not be able to zoom out!

In this case the jpeg may get printed out to 8" x 10".

----

This is my case: I started with a photo taken by a photographer on
his digital camera. This is the data for that photo:

Size: 1960 x 3008 Pixels (5.90 MPixels)
Print Size: 69.1 x 106.1 cm; 27.2 x 41.8 inches
Original Colors: 16.7 Millions (24 BitsPerPixel)
File Size: 944.30 KB (966,959 Bytes)
Uncompressed Size 16.9 MB
Compression Ratio: 18.3

The print size looks huge. At 944 KB it is a little too big to send
by email so I compressed it down to 299.7 KB by saving it in ACDsee
and applying some compression.

The weird thing to me is that the Size (above) and Print Size have
stayed the same although the Compression Ratio is now 57.6.

Is this jpeg still going to display on a screen and print on a
printer as if it were 27 x 42 inches?

What do I need to do? I have access to both PhotoShop or Paint Shop
Pro.

Sue
Related resources
July 7, 2005 11:00:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,comp.compression,alt.graphics.photoshop (More info?)

Susan P wrote:
> Hi you specialists, I have used PCs for years but am a newbie when it
> comes to resizing jpegs. I'd welcome some help in understanding how
> to compress and resize a jpeg so it can be sent by email to be viewed
> and printed easily by everyone.
>
> My worry is that some email programs may open a jpeg automatically
> and I guess it's possible that the software may not have the
> capability to shrink jpegs which have been created to display at a
> large size.
>
> I suspect the result could be an extreme close up of some detail in
> the picture. With a limited email application I suspect it's even
> possible the user may not be able to zoom out!
>
> In this case the jpeg may get printed out to 8" x 10".
>
> ----
>
> This is my case: I started with a photo taken by a photographer on
> his digital camera. This is the data for that photo:
>
> Size: 1960 x 3008 Pixels (5.90 MPixels)
> Print Size: 69.1 x 106.1 cm; 27.2 x 41.8 inches
> Original Colors: 16.7 Millions (24 BitsPerPixel)
> File Size: 944.30 KB (966,959 Bytes)
> Uncompressed Size 16.9 MB
> Compression Ratio: 18.3
>
> The print size looks huge. At 944 KB it is a little too big to send
> by email so I compressed it down to 299.7 KB by saving it in ACDsee
> and applying some compression.
>
> The weird thing to me is that the Size (above) and Print Size have
> stayed the same although the Compression Ratio is now 57.6.
>
> Is this jpeg still going to display on a screen and print on a
> printer as if it were 27 x 42 inches?
>
> What do I need to do? I have access to both PhotoShop or Paint Shop
> Pro.
>
> Sue
In Paint Shop Pro, with an image open click on Image/Resize. Set the resolution at 72 dpi
- which is normal for most diplays. Then click the box next to "Lock Aspect Ratio:, and
set the width of the picture to what you want t to be on the screen. Click on OK, and
you're done. Save the image in a new location or woith a dew name, as a .jpg file. Look
for the Options box, where you can set the compression. While thee file is still opne, you
can click on File/Send to generate an e-mail with the picture.
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 11:15:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,comp.compression,alt.graphics.photoshop (More info?)

"Susan P" <Susan_P@nomail.com> wrote in message
news:968CC14F75B2272A58@204.153.244.156...
> Hi you specialists, I have used PCs for years but am a newbie when it
> comes to resizing jpegs. I'd welcome some help in understanding how
> to compress and resize a jpeg so it can be sent by email to be viewed
> and printed easily by everyone.
>
> My worry is that some email programs may open a jpeg automatically
> and I guess it's possible that the software may not have the
> capability to shrink jpegs which have been created to display at a
> large size.
>
> I suspect the result could be an extreme close up of some detail in
> the picture. With a limited email application I suspect it's even
> possible the user may not be able to zoom out!
>
> In this case the jpeg may get printed out to 8" x 10".
>
> ----
>
> This is my case: I started with a photo taken by a photographer on
> his digital camera. This is the data for that photo:
>
> Size: 1960 x 3008 Pixels (5.90 MPixels)
> Print Size: 69.1 x 106.1 cm; 27.2 x 41.8 inches
> Original Colors: 16.7 Millions (24 BitsPerPixel)
> File Size: 944.30 KB (966,959 Bytes)
> Uncompressed Size 16.9 MB
> Compression Ratio: 18.3
>
> The print size looks huge. At 944 KB it is a little too big to send
> by email so I compressed it down to 299.7 KB by saving it in ACDsee
> and applying some compression.
>
> The weird thing to me is that the Size (above) and Print Size have
> stayed the same although the Compression Ratio is now 57.6.
>
> Is this jpeg still going to display on a screen and print on a
> printer as if it were 27 x 42 inches?
>
> What do I need to do? I have access to both PhotoShop or Paint Shop
> Pro.
>
> Sue

for printing save the original

for emailing: If you have windows XP you just do as suggested, right click
the picture or list of pics, send to>email recipient> it will ask you if you
want to resize them, let it, an email form comes up with the attachments
resized nicely.

for internet/website use: If you are using Photoshop? Use SAVE FOR WEB, it
will show you exactly what it will look like and fix the resolution to 72.
For photos use JPEG HIGH.
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 12:46:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,comp.compression,alt.graphics.photoshop (More info?)

On Thu, 07 Jul 2005 19:00:11 +0100, Susan P <Susan_P@nomail.com>
wrote:

>Hi you specialists, I have used PCs for years but am a newbie when it
>comes to resizing jpegs. I'd welcome some help in understanding how
>to compress and resize a jpeg so it can be sent by email to be viewed
>and printed easily by everyone

Sue,

right-click on the JPG file in Windows Explorer, then select
Send to, Email recipient.

Hans-Georg

--
No mail, please.
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 1:03:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,comp.compression,alt.graphics.photoshop (More info?)

Indeed display software and printing software are different beasts. The
file itself may have no control over how these software packages display
or print the image. I think it is unlikely that you can format the
image file in such a way as to control whatever software a recipient
might have.

In fact, printing typically takes a LOT of user control to specify the
parameters for a good print.

To complicate it even further, an email client program may well likely
display an image on a screen differently than a web browser would.


Susan P wrote:
> Hi you specialists, I have used PCs for years but am a newbie when it
> comes to resizing jpegs. I'd welcome some help in understanding how
> to compress and resize a jpeg so it can be sent by email to be viewed
> and printed easily by everyone.
>
> My worry is that some email programs may open a jpeg automatically
> and I guess it's possible that the software may not have the
> capability to shrink jpegs which have been created to display at a
> large size.
>
> I suspect the result could be an extreme close up of some detail in
> the picture. With a limited email application I suspect it's even
> possible the user may not be able to zoom out!
>
> In this case the jpeg may get printed out to 8" x 10".
>
> ----
>
> This is my case: I started with a photo taken by a photographer on
> his digital camera. This is the data for that photo:
>
> Size: 1960 x 3008 Pixels (5.90 MPixels)
> Print Size: 69.1 x 106.1 cm; 27.2 x 41.8 inches
> Original Colors: 16.7 Millions (24 BitsPerPixel)
> File Size: 944.30 KB (966,959 Bytes)
> Uncompressed Size 16.9 MB
> Compression Ratio: 18.3
>
> The print size looks huge. At 944 KB it is a little too big to send
> by email so I compressed it down to 299.7 KB by saving it in ACDsee
> and applying some compression.
>
> The weird thing to me is that the Size (above) and Print Size have
> stayed the same although the Compression Ratio is now 57.6.
>
> Is this jpeg still going to display on a screen and print on a
> printer as if it were 27 x 42 inches?
>
> What do I need to do? I have access to both PhotoShop or Paint Shop
> Pro.
>
> Sue
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 1:10:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,comp.compression,alt.graphics.photoshop (More info?)

In rec.photo.digital Marvin <physchem@cloud9.net> wrote:
>>
>> Size: 1960 x 3008 Pixels (5.90 MPixels)
>> Print Size: 69.1 x 106.1 cm; 27.2 x 41.8 inches
>> Original Colors: 16.7 Millions (24 BitsPerPixel)
>> File Size: 944.30 KB (966,959 Bytes)
>> Uncompressed Size 16.9 MB
>> Compression Ratio: 18.3
>>
>> What do I need to do? I have access to PhotoShop and Paint Shop Pro.
>>
> In Paint Shop Pro, with an image open click on Image/Resize...

This is the best advice you've received. Or use Photoshop resample.

DO NOT RECOMPRESS the 1960x3008 image. It will lower quality.
Archive the original, and do not edit it again.

For e-mailing, in the Resize or Resample window, type in 25%.
JPEG images are best when downsampled 50% or 25%, so that the
8x8 block DCT boundaries are not disturbed. Click OK or Apply,
then save the image in a new file.

You will have a 490x750 image, which is perfect for e-mailing.
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 8:00:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,comp.compression,alt.graphics.photoshop (More info?)

Susan P wrote:
> What do I need to do? I have access to both PhotoShop or Paint Shop
> Pro.
Without Photoshop or Paint Shop Pro it's possible with:

Windows Paint:
Start/Paint or Start/All Programs/Accessories/Paint
File/Open/Select xxx.jpg picture/Open
Image/Stretch and Skew/Stretch Horizontal 50%, Vertical 50%/Ok
File/Save as/xxx.jpg

To print File/Print

Handy for quick resize (no print option) is the program "A Smaller
Image":
http://www.trivista.com/products/asmallerimage/

"A Smaller Image" trail version 3.1 make a red "X" on all images, but
older version 1.0 is working without this problem in free trail mode:
ftp://sac-ftp.gratex.sk/graph/asimg10.zip

A nice free Windows Paint replacement is Paint.NET
http://www.eecs.wsu.edu/paint.net/
Anonymous
July 10, 2005 4:48:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,comp.compression,alt.graphics.photoshop (More info?)

In article <968CC14F75B2272A58@204.153.244.156>, Susan P
<Susan_P@nomail.com> writes
>Hi you specialists, I have used PCs for years but am a newbie when it
>comes to resizing jpegs. I'd welcome some help in understanding how
>to compress and resize a jpeg so it can be sent by email to be viewed
>and printed easily by everyone.
>
There really isn't an optimum solution that will do both tasks well with
the same file. Prints have a much higher resolution than screen
displays. A typical screen is only about 72-120ppi, whilst a reasonable
print is at least 300ppi - almost 10 times as many pixels for the same
image size. If you compress the image in a jpeg small enough to email
conveniently then it is likely to show a lot of artefacts when printed.

>My worry is that some email programs may open a jpeg automatically
>and I guess it's possible that the software may not have the
>capability to shrink jpegs which have been created to display at a
>large size.
>
>I suspect the result could be an extreme close up of some detail in
>the picture. With a limited email application I suspect it's even
>possible the user may not be able to zoom out!
>
That is certainly possible - a consequence of the 10x as many pixels
that a decent print requires.

>This is my case: I started with a photo taken by a photographer on his
>digital camera. This is the data for that photo:
>
> Size: 1960 x 3008 Pixels (5.90 MPixels)
> Print Size: 69.1 x 106.1 cm; 27.2 x 41.8 inches
> Original Colors: 16.7 Millions (24 BitsPerPixel)
> File Size: 944.30 KB (966,959 Bytes)
> Uncompressed Size 16.9 MB
> Compression Ratio: 18.3

>The print size looks huge. At 944 KB it is a little too big to send
>by email so I compressed it down to 299.7 KB by saving it in ACDsee
>and applying some compression.
>
>The weird thing to me is that the Size (above) and Print Size have
>stayed the same although the Compression Ratio is now 57.6.

That is because you are not resizing the image - just compressing it
more. Jpeg compression trades image quality for file size, the image
size remains exactly the same.
>
>Is this jpeg still going to display on a screen and print on a
>printer as if it were 27 x 42 inches?

The default size on screen is always determined by the number of pixels
in the image and the pixel resolution that the end user has their
display driver set for. So, if they have a 17" display with 1024x 768
pixels then the unzoomed image above will be about the size given and so
it will overfill their display so they only see the small fraction of
the image - just as you were concerned about.

Similarly, the print size depends on the number of pixels and the print
resolution that they use. In this case, however, many applications
(including PS) set the default print resolution and size based on the
information they find for those parameters in the file. Consequently it
will often print at just the size you specify in the image.

Now, looking at your data above, 1960x3008 pixels produces an image of
27.2x41.5 inches. That corresponds to exactly 72ppi, which is the
default for a fairly coarse display. This will look very poor if the
print application uses the default size. Before printing you should
redefine the resolution (without resizing) to around 300ppi, which will
result in an image that is about 6.5x10".

It usually isn't a good idea to keep saving jpeg images, because the
compression artefacts mount up at each save process - even if you keep
the compression rate the same. Hence I do not recommend changing this
image resolution and saving new file - just change the resolution before
printing. I am guessing that these images are originating in a digital
camera. There might be an option in the camera software that sets the
default resolution that it saves the images at. If there is, change
that to 300ppi (or 300dpi if it uses bad nomenclature!). If you have an
Epson printer (never mind what anyone else has - it is your print!) then
set the default resolution to either 240ppi or 360ppi, since these are
matched to the optimum for the Epson range.

The best solution for convenient email and printing, as one or two
others have advised, is to create two different files - one optimised
for small size at a display compatible pixel count and the other
optimised for printing. Using PS or PSP resize your original images to
about 800x600 pixels (or 800x521 pixels in this case) with 72ppi and
then save that at medium to high compression for email. You should get
a file size of around 50kb or less, which will download very quickly.

If anyone wants to print this then, of course, they can but the results
won't be as good as if you send them the original image as a tiff file
or a jpeg with minimum compression.
--
Kennedy
Yes, Socrates himself is particularly missed;
A lovely little thinker, but a bugger when he's pissed.
Python Philosophers (replace 'nospam' with 'kennedym' when replying)
Anonymous
July 10, 2005 4:48:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,comp.compression,alt.graphics.photoshop (More info?)

Kennedy McEwen wrote:
> In article <968CC14F75B2272A58@204.153.244.156>, Susan P
> <Susan_P@nomail.com> writes
>
>
> The default size on screen is always determined by the number of pixels
> in the image and the pixel resolution that the end user has their
> display driver set for. So, if they have a 17" display with 1024x 768
> pixels then the unzoomed image above will be about the size given and so
> it will overfill their display so they only see the small fraction of
> the image - just as you were concerned about.
>
True if you specify when viewed in most browsers.
>
> The best solution for convenient email and printing, as one or two
> others have advised, is to create two different files - one optimised
> for small size at a display compatible pixel count and the other
> optimised for printing. Using PS or PSP resize your original images to
> about 800x600 pixels (or 800x521 pixels in this case) with 72ppi and
> then save that at medium to high compression for email. You should get
> a file size of around 50kb or less, which will download very quickly.
>
> If anyone wants to print this then, of course, they can but the results
> won't be as good as if you send them the original image as a tiff file
> or a jpeg with minimum compression.

Another way to handle it is to put up a website, using about the same
parameter.

--
John McWilliams
Anonymous
July 11, 2005 5:10:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,comp.compression,alt.graphics.photoshop (More info?)

In article <Mc-dnfJRAK7J10zfRVn-tA@comcast.com>, John McWilliams
<jpmcw@comcast.net> writes
>Kennedy McEwen wrote:
>> In article <968CC14F75B2272A58@204.153.244.156>, Susan P
>><Susan_P@nomail.com> writes
>> The default size on screen is always determined by the number of
>>pixels in the image and the pixel resolution that the end user has
>>their display driver set for. So, if they have a 17" display with
>>1024x 768 pixels then the unzoomed image above will be about the size
>>given and so it will overfill their display so they only see the
>>small fraction of the image - just as you were concerned about.
>>
>True if you specify when viewed in most browsers.

And almost all email readers, which is what the OP was concerned about.

--
Kennedy
Yes, Socrates himself is particularly missed;
A lovely little thinker, but a bugger when he's pissed.
Python Philosophers (replace 'nospam' with 'kennedym' when replying)
!