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CPU Fan Sometimes Works

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September 7, 2012 7:48:56 PM

Hey guys, I searched for forums before posting this and I still don't see a solution. I've had my computer for about 3-4 years and a couple of months ago my CPU fan died. I bought the same exact fan with the heat sink that came with it, but only used the new fan inside. Though sometimes when I turn my computer on, the fan doesn't want to turn on. I've air dusted it, unplugged and replugged, removed all my usb connections. And sometimes these fix the problem...but not today. Could it be my motherboard? Heat sink?

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September 7, 2012 8:44:35 PM

kman8675 said:
Hey guys, I searched for forums before posting this and I still don't see a solution. I've had my computer for about 3-4 years and a couple of months ago my CPU fan died. I bought the same exact fan with the heat sink that came with it, but only used the new fan inside. Though sometimes when I turn my computer on, the fan doesn't want to turn on. I've air dusted it, unplugged and replugged, removed all my usb connections. And sometimes these fix the problem...but not today. Could it be my motherboard? Heat sink?


You can test the motherboard fairly simply. Just get a fan you know works and plug it into the CPU fan connector (it doesn't need to be a CPU fan four-pin. It can be a standard case fan's 3-pin. You'll see how it lines up). If the test fan works then you had bad luck and got a bad fan or something. If not then your CPU fan connector got bent or damaged somehow. You can do a work around and connect to another fan header on the board, or buy a fan controller. I don't know about fixing. If under warranty they might do something, but otherwise you might need to buy a new board if it's really a problem.
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September 7, 2012 8:57:32 PM

DRosencraft said:
You can test the motherboard fairly simply. Just get a fan you know works and plug it into the CPU fan connector (it doesn't need to be a CPU fan four-pin. It can be a standard case fan's 3-pin. You'll see how it lines up). If the test fan works then you had bad luck and got a bad fan or something. If not then your CPU fan connector got bent or damaged somehow. You can do a work around and connect to another fan header on the board, or buy a fan controller. I don't know about fixing. If under warranty they might do something, but otherwise you might need to buy a new board if it's really a problem.



I just plugged in a 3 pin fan, and it worked fine.
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September 7, 2012 9:04:24 PM

I'm pretty sure I don't have another 4 pin connector in my computer. And I'm assuming that a 3 pin fan won't do the job. Maybe I should try getting a new 4 pin fan? Any suggestions for a quick fix?
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September 7, 2012 10:37:54 PM

Actaully, the right fan could work even if it's just a 3-pin. The only thing is there won't be any fan control (it will always run at full speed). Noctua sells a CPU cooler (the NH-D14) that actually has two 3-pin 140mm fans and a 2:1 adapter that is also a 3-pin connector, so it can work. If you have an extra/useable 3-pin fan you can likely get by just fine with it if you can mount it on your cooler. If you're not comfortable with doing that there isn't much choice else but to get a new 4-pin fan.
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September 8, 2012 1:00:00 AM

Ok, cool. Would I need to look for a certain type of 4 pin fan? Or can it just be any type of 4 pin?
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September 8, 2012 2:04:02 AM

Fans are fairly standard. Once you know what size you want it's all about CFM and dba. You want the highest CFM for the lowest amount of noise. The trick you'll have to deal with is finding an actual CPU fan. Most fans advertised as being 4-pin are actually molex, which is another thing entirely. Other than that you can pretty much get whatever suits you. This fan is an 80mm, and this fan is a 120mm (don't know what size you're looking for). These are some examples, but if you start searching on your own you'll realize that there's not a whole lot of options for CPU fans sold separate from an actual cooler. You may end up finding yourself having to buy a new cooler altogether, but there are a few options. If you're looking for a good cooler for not a lot of money, the Cooler Master Hyper 212 has a fairly good track record. If you're looking to spend signficantly more, Noctua is considered the best right now.
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September 15, 2012 5:26:04 PM

I had managed to fiddle around with my current fan. I had managed to get another week out of it. I believe it is defected, it wants to work when it wants to. So I went to my local Best Buy and bought a new fan. This fan is a 3 speed fan, and I kept it on high setting. Only thing different is that this fan is 80mm compared to the original which is 90mm which is almost 1/2 inch. The fan seems to cover almost the same amount as the other fan and the heat sink doesn't seem hot. Anything I should be concerned about or things I should check?
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September 15, 2012 6:21:30 PM

If you've got it set securely, and it seems to work, it should be fine. You might want to check on your CPU temp. In terms of cooling an 80mm won't do quite as well versus a 90mm, but it shouldn't be that noticable. You might want to check on your CPU temps in your BIOS (the motherboard's manual should tell you how to get there), just to be sure they're not shooting up too high. That exact temp varies based on build, components, and room temp, so I can't say exactly for you what it should be, but you should try to stay as far below 40 Celcius as possible. Otherwise, keep an eye on things to make sure nothing falls out, falls off, or stops working like it should.
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