GTX 295 with a single blown... transistor?

I was playing Mass Effect 3 last night using my EVGA GTX 295 (had it for 2 years with no problems), and all of a sudden I heard a nasty pop, the screen went black, and I smelled a distinct firecracker-like smoke smell. Using another video card which worked, I deduced that my problem was indeed my 295.

Opening it up, the source of the smell was a blackened transistor (I think), on the "bottom" GPU (the one with the HDMI port and PCI slot). No other part of either card is either smelly or blackened.



Although other areas are blackened around it sort of, I think they're probably fine. The epicenter definitely seems to be that single transistor (which is labelled Q3 as I found out by looking at pictures of a non-blackened card).

So you can probably guess my question. Since that small part is likely the problem, does anyone know if I can repair it by replacing the part? I have a solder kit and am fairly competent with it. This is a sweet card and I really don't want to drop several hundred to get a new card if this component is a couple bucks at most. The reason I'm even posting about it obviously, is that it is out of warranty. Although many 295s have lifetime warranties, this is a model number 017-P3-1291-BR - the BR models have a 1-year warranty.

If this is something you are familiar with, where would I find the part? If I should post this somewhere else, let me know that, too.

Thanks a lot.
22 answers Last reply
More about single blown transistor
  1. I guess there's not a lot of electronics-savvy people on the forum at the moment. That's fine. But, does anyone know of a good electronics forum or some other place that may know what part I need?

    So far not getting much from the EVGA forums.
  2. this card still under warranty rma would be easier
  3. Anastomosis said:
    The reason I'm even posting about it obviously, is that it is out of warranty. Although many 295s have lifetime warranties, this is a model number 017-P3-1291-BR - the BR models have a 1-year warranty.
  4. could you read what is on the other two that are not blow
  5. To the left of the really burned part is a large integrated circuit with a white mark on it. Does that look like it got burned up too?

    My other concern is that these PCBs are often (always for motherboards) multi-layer. That burn looks pretty bad - it might have damaged connections you can't even see.
  6. the best for him will be to get a new card
  7. Sorry to say but whether you want to spend several hundred dollars, is irrelevant. Do you want to game again on a decent card? If you try and repair that, who knows what the consequences can be. Could destroy another component inside your PC. But its your PC. Good luck.
  8. Yeah, here is a link to an undamaged card (all the way on the left side of the card)



    You're right - if the PCB is multilayer, there's not much I can do if there are connections fried I can't even see. Just thought I would drop a couple bucks and see if it works. The other IC etc look like they were stained, but not really damaged. In the meantime, I cleaned them off and they looked ok but who knows.

    If this Q3 fried component is a proprietary IC from EVGA or something, I guess I could only get it from them (still waiting on their response) but if it's a common thing, I would be willing to try.
  9. vrumor said:
    Sorry to say but whether you want to spend several hundred dollars, is irrelevant.

    Not sure what you mean here. It's relevant to my wallet.

    Quote:
    Do you want to game again on a decent card? If you try and repair that, who knows what the consequences can be. Could destroy another component inside your PC. But its your PC. Good luck.


    I don't know the consequences. That's why I'm asking if anyone here has experience with it.
  10. My point being, whether you like it or not, youll end up shelling out for a new card.
  11. if you look closer this is a condenser mark c 15 got ovepower so it blow out wish you good luck if you could find one also look under if there is nothing else burn or blown out
  12. Well... I would say its not like you could break it more by trying to repair it, might as well go for it.
  13. Depends if you want to risk destroying other parts in your PC if something goes wrong, Im not sure of the consequences, and personally I wouldn't want to find out :D This is why I buy cards with a lifetime warranty ;) Big Risk/Reward ratio, could pay off for a few bucks or cost you $$$!

    I put my own computers together, not actually build (solder) my own computers! -J/K and good luck!
  14. P.S. I solder too, for welding, plumbing (work construction, don't know if I would try that. Looks like around a buck 50 on ebay for one.
  15. would not try that on mine even and i got the knowledge to do it
  16. Sign up to Overclockers.net forums and post in THIS section -

    http://www.overclock.net/f/189/general-volt-mods

    Theres a guy who replaces Blown Caps and all sorts of stuff. I've been reading his work logs and its brilliant. If you are in the US you may be able to ship the card down to him and get him to repair it for you - hes done it for quite a few people before.

    PizzaMan and CL3P20 are both pros and will be able to handle this sort of job.
  17. It is possibly repairable, but the question is it worth the effort?
    Can a new card be had for similar cost to the amount of time + effort you will use to repair this one? This is always a serious consideration.

    But if u want to repair it for the hell of it, go ahead.
    That damage doesn't appear to be anything major, unless there is major heat damage to the lower layers.
    I have attempted to repair many GPUs and Motherboards over the years, I tend to find i reasonably good luck with the repairs when the parts are available.

    You biggest problem is possibly actually obtaining the part needing to be replaced, as some vendors do not sell the parts they use on the common market.
  18. There was a cascade failure on the card.
    It's toast.....

    You could turn it into a learning experience and try to repair in your spare time.

    But I would toss it since it was a cascade. There could be other IC's that had damage but don't show it, making you pull ur hair out after repairs are made, but the card is still flaky or dead.
  19. maybe you can get lucky and find a non working 295 on Ebay for $5 and yank the transistor off of that. i don't think your gonna find one walking into radio shack.

    go for it, i'm pulling for ya!

    because i'd love to see the nay sayers, who honestly don't know what their talking about, proven wrong! :)
  20. Thanks for everyone's help! As suggested multiple times, yes I am going to get a new card. Mainly because I need to actually use the computer for work (and have no on-board video).

    But in some free time, I would love to learn how to repair something like this (repaired my monitor once with bad capacitors for example), so all the input is very valuable.

    If it is a cascade failure and a single component change does nothing, I probably won't go crazy trying to fix it then. That just seems insane. :p
  21. Just be careful sticking it back into a PC you care about after you fix it. Dont want to have to replace all those components due to it frying other stuff. That was kinda my point all along.
  22. If you do decide that you want to dig into some repair attempts: mouser. com

    They got everything about electronics there.

    Also, that "U1"(p2349wf ) chip next to the blown Q3 Transistor *was* the chips' PWM voltage controller to the Q1 Transistor, so that sucker is definitely blown.

    err, let me rephrase that:
    U1 controlled the GPU's power by switching Q3 Transistor off and on to achieve desired voltage.

    It blew up when Q3 nuked, you can even see 2 of the pins missing =O
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