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Is this a reliable PSU?

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September 10, 2012 11:21:50 AM

OCZ Z-SERIES 1000W 80+ Gold Certified 24PIN ATX 83A 12V Afc Modular Power Supply W/ 135mm Fan

I've read reviews and few report having faulty internals making it extremely loud when used, however it has a 5 year warranty and RMA'ing with them apparently is very simple and good so I don't think I should worry and I should just pick it up. However if anyone has some personal experience with it or some knowledge they'd like to share about it then feel free.

I've never built a computer before, however since this is on sale and I don't have all the money for my new build yet I'm thinking about just getting this and hooking it up with my current old crappy build. Not sure if it would be compatible, or even how I would hook it up. Here are the specs:

OS: Windows Xp Professional
GPU: NVIDIA GeForce 6200
BIOS: (I don't really know how to use BIOS) Phoenix - AwardBIOS v6.00PG
CPU: AMD Athlon 64 3200+ 2.0Ghz
RAM: 1024MB
Dirext x: 9.0c
(don't know what mobo I'm using, these are from dxdiag)

More about : reliable psu

a b ) Power supply
September 10, 2012 11:29:43 AM

Whats the price? seems alright, though I doubt you would need that much power.

on amazon its 225 buck... I would put that money into the build rather than the psu. if you aren't doing 4x 480s then you should be fine. Your current build uses less then 300w, heck even mine does (athlon 2 x3 + 6870)

Edit: I am guessing there might be better 1000w psus in that price range on the off chance you do need that much power. (no time to look though.)
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a c 158 ) Power supply
September 10, 2012 11:34:16 AM

The first thing is that you don't need anywhere near a 1000W PSU. A system with a GT6200 GPU can run on a good quality 300-350W PSU. Check out my sig below for links to a PSU guide and a list of Recommended PSUs.
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a b ) Power supply
September 10, 2012 11:38:08 AM

As long as you have 4-pin molex connectors and SATA power connectors, you can hook up your old stuff.

What do you plan to do with your new build?

Is the sale on this power supply so low that it makes sense for you to get 1000W?

Most new builds that aren't overclocked with 2 modern video cards in SLI can run on a 750W power supply.

Are you planning on running more than 2 video cards or overclocking the heck out of your new machine (once you build it?)?
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a b ) Power supply
September 10, 2012 12:59:20 PM

Rugger said:
The first thing is that you don't need anywhere near a 1000W PSU. A system with a GT6200 GPU can run on a good quality 300-350W PSU. Check out my sig below for links to a PSU guide and a list of Recommended PSUs.

Actually, 300W is also more than enough for such a system, don't know what made him think of a 1k PSU :pt1cable: 
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September 10, 2012 2:24:58 PM

Just pick up a Corsair cx500 for under £50 and would enable you to upgrade to better graphics card at later date.
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September 10, 2012 4:29:40 PM

Lol I don't think I made myself clear, I'm going to be buying this and putting it in my current crappy build until I get my NEW one and putting it in the NEW one which will be using much more power, like 700-800W. The reason I'm getting it is because it's on sale for $100, which is crazy low. I just wanted to know if it's a trustable brand or w/e.
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a b ) Power supply
September 10, 2012 4:37:11 PM

OCZ-ZX 1K got 9.5 from 10 on jonnyguru testing which is a great score, but what on earth can consume 800W? What will be your new build?
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September 10, 2012 4:45:08 PM

Please, post here the new system config you're buying.
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a b ) Power supply
September 10, 2012 4:47:04 PM

GTX 680 SLI require at most a 750W PSU, and it will be more than sufficient.
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September 10, 2012 4:47:12 PM

BenQ XL2420TX w/ 3d vision
GTX 680 (sli or 690 in the future)
i7 3770K
Z77 mobo
win 7 64bit
16gb 1600mhz (maybe 32gb in future)
1TB 7200rm hdd
SDD(s)
PCI sound card w/ firewire port

don't know if this is 800 watt or not especially since I can't get all specific products but that's the general idea. I may not be getting all of that immedialty but over time I will.

Also, would it fit fine in my HAF 912?
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a c 80 ) Power supply
September 10, 2012 4:49:52 PM

thetechnoobguy posted while i was. so.....

2-3 x sli and massive overclocks :)  That's my guess. And about what one may need with how efficient hardware is getting.

I mean my personal system with a 5870(still does what i need it to so have not replaced it yet.) and 2600K @ 4.4(not much of an overclock from what some users push.) has not broken the 300 watts at the wall mark yet :) 

Not that you can ever have too much power(well about 2x what your average use will be reaches the best efficiency and leaves lots of headroom. Modern power supplies are efficient over a very wide range of loads).
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a c 138 ) Power supply
September 10, 2012 4:56:43 PM

thetechnoobguy said:
OCZ Z-SERIES 1000W 80+ Gold Certified 24PIN ATX 83A 12V Afc Modular Power Supply W/ 135mm Fan

I've read reviews and few report having faulty internals making it extremely loud when used, however it has a 5 year warranty and RMA'ing with them apparently is very simple and good so I don't think I should worry and I should just pick it up. However if anyone has some personal experience with it or some knowledge they'd like to share about it then feel free.

I've never built a computer before, however since this is on sale and I don't have all the money for my new build yet I'm thinking about just getting this and hooking it up with my current old crappy build. Not sure if it would be compatible, or even how I would hook it up. Here are the specs:

OS: Windows Xp Professional
GPU: NVIDIA GeForce 6200
BIOS: (I don't really know how to use BIOS) Phoenix - AwardBIOS v6.00PG
CPU: AMD Athlon 64 3200+ 2.0Ghz
RAM: 1024MB
Dirext x: 9.0c
(don't know what mobo I'm using, these are from dxdiag)


OCZ Z series 1000w is a tier 3 unit on this list.
http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx

But the jonnyguru reviews it well.
Btu, $100 seems like a price too good to be true.
Be careful.

GTX680 in sli needs about 800w, so you ahould be good
If you opted for GTX690 instead, you are only looking at 620 w. or so.
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September 10, 2012 4:58:15 PM

Damn why do they even make them or even 1200 watt psu's then, what would people be using for that much power?

It's just super cheap so I was thinking of grabbing it, it's cheaper than most 750-800 watts not on sale, so mise well right?

what if I SLI a 690? Can you even do that lol? Would that be mega overkill?
also it's like $140 on sale with $30 MIR I've never done MIR but I'm sure they would explain it. I wouldn't worry too much about it since it's ncix unless they can't be trusted anymore lol.
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a c 80 ) Power supply
September 10, 2012 5:02:04 PM

You can SLI GTX 690s. Overkill it is :) 

It is important to know that some people just feel better with bigger power supplies(for many reason. it will not fail or even bragging rights. Some users are just CRAZY with overclocking).

For my, Its quieter :) 

I have not had problems with OCZ power supplies in the past(well i did have a fan get noisy, it was after warranty so i just swapped it.).

I had stopped reading the PSU tier lists back when they would rate one power supply good and another as DO NOT BUY when they are the SAME UNIT(i mean exactly the same unit, just a rebrand). It had been fixed, but if you do not know, do not fake that brand XYZ is bad while the same power supply from ABC is GREAT.
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a c 138 ) Power supply
September 10, 2012 5:13:43 PM

thetechnoobguy said:
Damn why do they even make them or even 1200 watt psu's then, what would people be using for that much power?

It's just super cheap so I was thinking of grabbing it, it's cheaper than most 750-800 watts not on sale, so mise well right?

what if I SLI a 690? Can you even do that lol? Would that be mega overkill?
also it's like $140 on sale with $30 MIR I've never done MIR but I'm sure they would explain it. I wouldn't worry too much about it since it's ncix unless they can't be trusted anymore lol.


I think it might be a very good deal if that is what you need.
It is a gold rated unit which is good.
It could actually run sli GTX690(yes, it is overkill)
For your reference, here is a good guide to graphics card psu needs:
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm
It is not a modular unit, so you will have a bunch of unused power leads to deal with.
But, I expect in the future that there will be even stronger graphics cards available than the GTX680/GTX690, and they will use even less power.
I can't think of a good reason why it could not be used on your current rig.

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September 10, 2012 5:23:13 PM

Alright, if it is compatible with my current build until I get the parts for my new one I'm going to pick it up. The thing is I've never built a computer, would it be a simple installation? Would it have all the pins and connectors needed? Just want to make sure, don't want to be going back saying it didn't fit. What about BIOS, would I need to configure anything?
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September 10, 2012 5:33:08 PM

ok there is a bit of a snag there some of the older vendor cases are vendor specific and you may run into an issue where you have a non standard power supply in terms of bay size and psu size .. they do this to cut costs if you do decide to buy it i would also consider ordering a custom case just incase.. in your case your not going to want to get anything less then a mid tower.. check out corsair cooler master or next for there cases and go from there just make sure that the case you get can fit two 680s in sli
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September 10, 2012 5:35:51 PM

I have a HAF 912 that I bought, would it fit in that?
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September 10, 2012 5:36:48 PM

yea that would work just fine.. you didnt list a case so i just thought i should warn you
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a c 80 ) Power supply
September 10, 2012 5:37:29 PM

thetechnoobguy said:
Alright, if it is compatible with my current build until I get the parts for my new one I'm going to pick it up. The thing is I've never built a computer, would it be a simple installation? Would it have all the pins and connectors needed? Just want to make sure, don't want to be going back saying it didn't fit. What about BIOS, would I need to configure anything?


Power supply swapping is pretty much straight forward.

20/24 pin to MB
4/8 to MB <-many users end up forgetting this one, but then remember it :) 

6/8 to video cards(if it needs it).

All the plugs are designed to only fit on the right devices.
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September 10, 2012 5:37:36 PM

if all your parts are currently installed in that case now then it should just be a simple psu swap .. hey another thought is that 1000 watt psu modular as in it has modular cables? if not that may be a reason for the price .. i love the modular cable system because you can control how many cables and where to run them ... its super easy though.. just try not to put to much force when reconnecting / disconnecting the power cables dont want to warp or break that motherboard
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a c 138 ) Power supply
September 10, 2012 5:43:20 PM

thetechnoobguy said:
Alright, if it is compatible with my current build until I get the parts for my new one I'm going to pick it up. The thing is I've never built a computer, would it be a simple installation? Would it have all the pins and connectors needed? Just want to make sure, don't want to be going back saying it didn't fit. What about BIOS, would I need to configure anything?


The psu is a standard ATX size. That is 6.9" wide, 4.4" tall and 6.3" deep. Depth can vary among ATX standard psu's.
To be certain that it fits, just measure your current psu.
No doubt it would have all the connectors you need, plus many you don't.
Power connectors fit only one way, do not force anything.
How simple the job is, will depend on your case. If the case has restricted access, then the job is a bit tougher.

If replacement turns out to be a real problem, just don't do the replacement.
Keep the unit for your new build.
In fact, since you are running OK now, I see no compelling reason to do a replacement in the first place.
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September 10, 2012 5:44:53 PM

nukemaster said:
Power supply swapping is pretty much straight forward.

20/24 pin to MB
4/8 to MB <-many users end up forgetting this one, but then remember it :) 

6/8 to video cards(if it needs it).

All the plugs are designed to only fit on the right devices.


MB? I'm going to be re-watching some tutorials, if there are any that specifically show you how to install a PSU that would be cool. Theres just so many cords it just becomes confusing.

Thanks for all the help everyone, my last question is regarding the MIR, as I said it's $30 MIR, is MIR with ncix safe and easy or a pain to deal with in canada?

thanks again
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September 10, 2012 5:46:48 PM

geofelt said:
The psu is a standard ATX size. That is 6.9" wide, 4.4" tall and 6.3" deep. Depth can vary among ATX standard psu's.
To be certain that it fits, just measure your current psu.
No doubt it would have all the connectors you need, plus many you don't.
Power connectors fit only one way, do not force anything.
How simple the job is, will depend on your case. If the case has restricted access, then the job is a bit tougher.

If replacement turns out to be a real problem, just don't do the replacement.
Keep the unit for your new build.
In fact, since you are running OK now, I see no compelling reason to do a replacement in the first place.


Ok first no my HAF 912 is in it's case hasn't been touched my current PSU is in an ugly small crappy case.

It's not really a replacement, moreso me getting it because it's really cheap and I can use it for my new build when I get all the parts.
Uhmm wait are you saying use my current PSU for my new one? This PSU is not a replacement for my current system, it's just going in there to test it to make sure it works, and until I get all the new parts for my new PC.
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a c 80 ) Power supply
September 10, 2012 5:48:49 PM

MB is mainboard or motherboard

the 20/24 is the main one.

The 4/8 is the cpu power(added when cpu power consumption got higher. Let is even still on low power systems). The 8 pin version is for even more power. most power supplies have this as an 8 pin connector that fan be split to work with older 4 pin boards. The 20/24 is the same thing.

Something like this. the 24 part removes to make it work as a 20 pin and the cpu 2 part removes to make a 4 pin if needed. New PCI-E also has an extra 2 pin(8 pin 150 watt) section that can be removed to use it with a 6-pin(75 watt) card.
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September 10, 2012 5:55:55 PM

nukemaster said:
MB is mainboard or motherboard

the 20/24 is the main one.

The 4/8 is the cpu power(added when cpu power consumption got higher. Let is even still on low power systems). The 8 pin version is for even more power. most power supplies have this as an 8 pin connector that fan be split to work with older 4 pin boards. The 20/24 is the same thing.

Something like this. the 24 part removes to make it work as a 20 pin and the cpu 2 part removes to make a 4 pin if needed. New PCI-E also has an extra 2 pin(8 pin 150 watt) section that can be removed to use it with a 6-pin(75 watt) card.
http://i.neoseeker.com/a/OCZ_GXS_700W_PSU/OCZ%20Cables_thumb.jpg


Thanks. I will just look at what is connected currently and copy it with the new PSU to make it easier for myself.
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a c 80 ) Power supply
September 10, 2012 6:09:26 PM

Ohh and the reason for the low price is that the Z series is no longer being made and had been replaced with the ZS series.

I had a Z series 550 and it seemed fine(but it was for someone's system I had built. Never heard any complaints about it).
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a c 138 ) Power supply
September 10, 2012 7:15:44 PM

thetechnoobguy said:
Ok first no my HAF 912 is in it's case hasn't been touched my current PSU is in an ugly small crappy case.

It's not really a replacement, moreso me getting it because it's really cheap and I can use it for my new build when I get all the parts.
Uhmm wait are you saying use my current PSU for my new one? This PSU is not a replacement for my current system, it's just going in there to test it to make sure it works, and until I get all the new parts for my new PC.


NO... What I am saying is don't bother replacing your current psu with the new one. Just use the new one in a new build.

I would assume that it will work.
It seems to me like too much effort to replace a psu in your old case and do it again when you build anew.

The new psu is almost certain to work properly. In the off chance that it is somehow defective(rare, but it happens) then just either send it back to ncix or invoke the OCZ warranty.
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September 11, 2012 2:08:53 AM

geofelt said:
NO... What I am saying is don't bother replacing your current psu with the new one. Just use the new one in a new build.

I would assume that it will work.
It seems to me like too much effort to replace a psu in your old case and do it again when you build anew.

The new psu is almost certain to work properly. In the off chance that it is somehow defective(rare, but it happens) then just either send it back to ncix or invoke the OCZ warranty.


I've never built a computer before so I want to do as much rebuilding as possible for experience. It's really just a matter of popping it in then popping it out when I don't need it. Unless there's some complex thing that goes along that nobody is telling me about. I'm also going to be getting a GTX 680 and putting it in this build. I'm not sure if I should keep it in because it would be bottlenecked like crazy, but I'd just put it in to make sure it works.
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a c 138 ) Power supply
September 11, 2012 2:31:48 AM

thetechnoobguy said:
I've never built a computer before so I want to do as much rebuilding as possible for experience. It's really just a matter of popping it in then popping it out when I don't need it. Unless there's some complex thing that goes along that nobody is telling me about. I'm also going to be getting a GTX 680 and putting it in this build. I'm not sure if I should keep it in because it would be bottlenecked like crazy, but I'd just put it in to make sure it works.


I can understand your situation.
I just hate to tear apart a working pc if I don't have to.
Let's say you break something, then you have no working pc until you can fix the problem.

On the new build, I will "breadboard" it. That means I assemble the basic parts(mobo/cpu/ram/cooler) on a piece of cardboard and attach the psu to it. I power it on to verify that it posts. I then run memtest86+ to verify that the ram is good.
If there is a problem, it is easier to work out when everything is outside the case.

In the mean time, download and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manuals and you will have most of what you need to know.
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September 11, 2012 2:44:37 AM

geofelt said:
I can understand your situation.
I just hate to tear apart a working pc if I don't have to.
Let's say you break something, then you have no working pc until you can fix the problem.

On the new build, I will "breadboard" it. That means I assemble the basic parts(mobo/cpu/ram/cooler) on a piece of cardboard and attach the psu to it. I power it on to verify that it posts. I then run memtest86+ to verify that the ram is good.
If there is a problem, it is easier to work out when everything is outside the case.

In the mean time, download and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manuals and you will have most of what you need to know.


I have the manual for my case and not my mobo. This thing was bought a long time ago, I don't even know what mobo it is.

I'm going to strip it down than rebuild it, maybe even reinstall windows xp, in my HAF912, then put in the new power supply and connect the new fans and such. Also put in a GTX 680 since ones on sale. Does that sound good?
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Best solution

a c 80 ) Power supply
September 11, 2012 3:33:44 AM

No real issue with using the parts you have while waiting to get newer parts. It will not hurt the parts or system in any way.
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September 11, 2012 3:52:31 AM

Best answer selected by thetechnoobguy.nnThanks everyone for their support and help, if I could I would select more than one as best answer :p .
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