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Future computer build

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May 21, 2012 6:59:01 AM

Budget Range: under $620 USD

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, school work

Parts Not Required: keyboard, mouse, monitor, speakers, OS
preferred Website(s) for Parts: (e.g.: newegg.com, ncix.com -- to show us selection & pricing)

Country: USA

Parts Preferences: good brand's with decent pricing
overclocking: no

SLI or Crossfire:Maybe

Just wanting to know if this will work together mainly

NZXT M59 - 001BK Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
$49.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Western Digital Caviar Blue WD5000AAKX 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
$74.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Foxconn A9DA-S AM3 AMD 890GX SATA 6Gb/s HDMI ATX AMD Motherboard
$79.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

EDIMAX EW-7811Un USB 2.0 Wireless nano Adapter
$9.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

XFX HD-685X-ZCFC Radeon HD 6850 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card
$149.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
(might sub with this depending on what happens)
XFX Double D FX-777A-ZDF4 Radeon HD 7770 GHz Edition 1GB 128-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$149.99
(or might get the single fan version and save 30 bucks)

RAIDMAX Blackstone series RX-700AC 700W Continuous Power ATX12V V2.3 / EPS12V V2.91 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Modular Active power supply
$64.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


CORSAIR Vengeance 4GB 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model CMZ4GX3M1A1600C9
$25.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

AMD Phenom II X4 965 Black Edition Deneb 3.4GHz Socket AM3 125W Quad-Core Processor HDZ965FBGMBOX
$119.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

2 COOLER MASTER R4-L2R-20AC-GP 120mm Blue LED Case Fan
$15.98 (total)

any changes i need to make main question i have is can this psu support crossfire ( might get a nother graphics card at the end of the year)

More about : future computer build

May 21, 2012 7:36:37 AM

If you must buy an AMD CPU, at least get an AM3+ motherboard so you have a decent upgrade path.

Your PSU is fine for CF, although I'd get an Antec, Corsair, or Seasonic PSU instead of a RAIDMAX, but that's personal preference because those are generally better brands.

Get a 2x4GB RAM kit. An 8GB kit is a better way to go than 4GB, especially if you want this build to last.

PCIe WiFi adapters are usually better than USB WiFi adapters.

The Radeon 7770 is a better buy than the 6850. Almost identical performance, but the 7770 uses a lot less power, so it costs less in the power bill.
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May 21, 2012 7:57:04 AM

I doubt a 12 cent reduction in the yearly power bill is worth the performance drop.
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May 21, 2012 8:05:02 AM

Okay first off I must say, STAY AWAY FROM RAIDMAX! I don't trust them at all, get something like a CX500 (around 65 dollars as well) MUCH more reliable and has the Corsair/Seasonic reputation behind it.

Though, as blazorthon before me, an AM3+ mobo would be a better idea for 'futureproofing' of sorts....though I would feel more comfortable going with an LGA1155 set up if your budget can squeeze a bit more money.

Also about your graphics, I would recommend the 6850 over the 7770. I feel it's a much better value and as azeem said, the price you save on electricity isn't worth the performance drop :lol: 
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May 21, 2012 8:27:17 AM

i3-2120, H61 motherboard and whatever GPU can fit into budget would be my recommendation :) 

You'll find better gaming performance from this due to being able to afford a more expensive GPU.

A nice little gaming "sweet spot" most people over-look is an FX-4100 CPU paired with a 6850. This combo benches almost identical to i3-2100 and 6850, but instead you can use 1600MHz RAM, get a cheaper motherboard, and have a Quad-Core CPU. Anything higher than a 6850 GPU though, and i3-2100 is the way to go (or i3-2120 since the price difference is minimal).
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May 21, 2012 8:29:57 AM

Actually, you can use 1600 MHz RAM on an i3-2120.
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May 21, 2012 9:29:58 AM

azeem40 said:
Actually, you can use 1600 MHz RAM on an i3-2120.


Yes, you can. But NOT on a H61 motherboard. And it doesn't really make much sense to pay out for a Z68 motherboard?

I've seen suggestions for B75 motherboards on some builds, a good cheap alternative, HOWEVER...I've also seen issues that if you don't use an IVY BRIDGE CPU...then the RAM will only run up to 1333MHz.
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May 21, 2012 2:14:36 PM

azeem40 said:
I doubt a 12 cent reduction in the yearly power bill is worth the performance drop.


The cost reduction is far greater than a few cents and 7770 versus 6850, the two are so close in performance that the difference isn't perceptible and even if it was, the 7770 can be overclocked a little to match the 6850 while still using far less power. The i3 versus the Phenom II (especially an Ivy Bridge i3 when they come out) is also worth the power usage drop, although that one is less important because although the i3s use less power than AMD's CPUs, AMD's Phenom IIs and the FX-4100 are also a little cheaper, so unlike the 7770 versus the 6850, they don't make as big of a difference (unless you find an Ivy Bridge i3 and it doesn't cost more than a Sandy Bridge i3). How much money you save would depend on how many hours each year that the computer is on.

A computer with an 80+ Bronze or Silver 430-500w PSU, low voltage RAM, a Sandy Bridge i3, and a 7770 could halve the power used by the computer compared to a higher wattage, non 80+ PSU, Phenom II or FX-4100, 6850, and higher voltage RAM. On the RAM, it makes the least difference, but it's still a difference. Like I said before, an Ivy Bridge i3 would make an even greater difference than a Sandy Bridge i3, but they're not out yet. That would all add up to a lot of money saved each year. Of sure, less than a dozen dollars per month, but over a year, that's a decent amount of money that you save. Yes, it's that much money that you save, I've done the math in several arguments about it (as has there other people in the arguments) and it is correct.
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May 26, 2012 11:55:40 PM

Thanks the main question i have is will a 500 watt power supply support crossfire? and i know on the mobo i should get AM3+ due to upgradeability i was basicly ballancing option for crossfire with 4 ram slots and 2 pci-e x16 slots or 1 slot pci-e slot and 32 max ram with 4 slots, and im going amd for the fact i can get a quadcore for a decent price.
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May 27, 2012 1:37:25 AM

A 500w is enough for Crossfire with the Radeon 7770. Also, how many CPU cores you have does not matter. The dual core i3s are jsut as fast as the quad core Phenom IIs (actually, the dual core i3s are usually faster than the quad core Phenom IIs, not just as fast as them). I know the slogan "More cores matters", but trust me, it does not. For gaming, the i3s are faster CPUs and for most other work, even better than the Phenom II CPUs.

This is factual, not some biased opinion, and I cite the fact that I have an overclocked Phenom II x6 1090T based computer as one of my main computers. With the Radeon 7770, it won't make much of a difference which way you go, but I'm jsut saying, the i3 is actually the better processor and it's not better just because it uses less than half of the power used by the fastest Phenom II CPUs. (which are still slower than the i3 for most work, including gaming, although they are close).
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May 27, 2012 4:20:22 AM

ok ill look at the board sets which should help me pick the thing is im using a alienware m11x r2 atm so im trying to get something of similar preformance or better the core i5, i7 out of the question

EDIT: ( I wont be building this till after around August but just mainly checking if its compatible)
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May 27, 2012 6:10:29 AM

A desktop i3 or Phenom II x4 would be far faster for gaming than the CPU in that laptop. An i5 would be ridiculously faster than your current CPU and an i7 would be no faster than an i5 (going beyond four threads does not help gaming performance because except for BF3 MP, no game can use more than 4 threads and even those that use 4 threads do not use them all efficiently).

Pretty much any desktop CPU over $100 or so will beat an older high end laptop CPU. If you're not building until August, then don't set this build in stone because pricing will change on at least some parts and there will probably be some new parts out by then.too.
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May 27, 2012 4:37:11 PM

azeem40 said:
The performance increase is more than just a small amount.
http://www.anandtech.com/show/5541/amd-radeon-hd-7750-r...
^ Power consumption is only 13W more for the 6850, but it has a better price/performance ratio.


Are you really trying to use outdated benchmarks to prove your point? How many new drivers have been released since that review was typed up? If you want to tell someone that they are wrong about the performance of a card, at least use relevant benchmarks.

Even if those benchmarks were correct today (which they're not), the 7770 is far cheaper than it used to be. Before the price drops, it did have horrible performance for the money like that review suggests. However, check recent prices and you'll find that the three month old review is no longer applicable.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

That is a 7770 that is as cheap as the cheapest 6850s on newegg.com, yet this 7770 has a 15% factory overclock on the core and even if new drivers for the 7770 haven't come out and increased its performance by now, that's enough to catch the 6850 if we compare where it would be relative to the other factory OC 7770 and the reference 6850. Furthermore, the 7770 (like AMD's other GCN cards) has free gifts and depending on which card you buy. The above 7770 has a free copy of DiRt SHOWDOWN, a $60 game. Even if you don't want to play it, you can sell it. Either way, the 7770 suddenly has FAR more value than the 6850 and this 7770 also manages to be completely on-par with the or even beating the 6850 instead of right behind it.

Also, that 13w number? That's for long idle, according to your link. At load, the difference is much greater and even that outdated benchmark of yours shows that, so your number is wrong. In Metro 2033, the difference was 25w. In OCCT, the difference is even greater at 44w. So, even with the out-dated benchmark that you linked, we can see that the 7770 uses far less power relative to the 6850 than you claim, in addition to seeing how the factory overclocked card above is at least on-par with the 6850. With newer drivers, a reference 7770 is on-par wit the 6850 and this factory overclocked one is a little higher. That number also didn't take into account how much less power Radeon 7000 cards use at idle when you turn the display off.

I swear that I don't mean to be rude about this, but please, if you want to disprove someone, research into it and rationalize. Think about it. This benchmark is more than three months old, used early drivers, and you used the wrong power usage number. If anything, that's grounds for me to accuse you of bias because all of that could have been easily avoided had you simply checked the date on the benchmark and then checked the date of the most recent drivers for the 7770 and checked for reviews using them. The power usage problem could have been solved by you checking the title of the benchmark that you were looking at.
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May 28, 2012 1:02:14 AM

blazorthon said:
A desktop i3 or Phenom II x4 would be far faster for gaming than the CPU in that laptop. An i5 would be ridiculously faster than your current CPU and an i7 would be no faster than an i5 (going beyond four threads does not help gaming performance because except for BF3 MP, no game can use more than 4 threads and even those that use 4 threads do not use them all efficiently).

Pretty much any desktop CPU over $100 or so will beat an older high end laptop CPU. If you're not building until August, then don't set this build in stone because pricing will change on at least some parts and there will probably be some new parts out by then.too.

whell only thing that i have Set in stone is 4gb of ram 500gb hard drive (unless price drops on the 750gb-1tb's) and budget im flexible on anything.
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May 28, 2012 2:19:29 AM

Zer0mega said:
whell only thing that i have Set in stone is 4gb of ram 500gb hard drive (unless price drops on the 750gb-1tb's) and budget im flexible on anything.


Honestly, I recommend waiting for Ivy Bridge i3s and Vishera (desktop Piledriver CPUs) before buying so that you can chose a next generation low end platform instead of a previous generation platform, but if you're time-constrained, then waiting wouldn't be an option and I'd recommend a Sandy Bridge i3. A simple solution to that would be buying (AMD) a 9xx chipset motherboard with a very cheap Phenom II (maybe an x3 instead of an x4) and upgrading to a Piledriver quad core CPU when they come out or (Intel) buying a Z77 motherboard and a Sandy Bridge Pentium and then upgrading to an Ivy Bridge i3 when they come out.

Whether or not you buy cheap CPUs now and upgrade later or you jsut buy a decent CPU now, I recommend Intel at this time because Intel is consistently on-par with or beating AMD at all price points above $100 or so in performance and is constantly beating AMD in power efficiency (and thus power consumption at a similar or even greater performance level), so Intel is cheaper over time in your power bill. So, I'd have to say buy a decent Z77 motherboard and then either get a Sandy Bridge Pentium (if you want to upgrade to a better CPU later) or a Sandy Bridge i3 (if you don't want to upgrade the CPU any time soon).

For the hard drive, unless you have some sort of deal that I've missed, 500GB drives cost about $80. 2TB drives can be had for $100 to $130. That's over three times the capacity per dollar and doesn't cost a whole lot more. If you know that a 500GB will be enough for you, then don't bother with a higher capacity drive, but if you don't know for sure that a 500GB is enough for you, then get a 2TB drive. Keep in mind that a drive slows down as you fill it up, so you'll need to fill that 2TB drive up a lot more than the 500GB drive before it shows signs of bad speed degradation, even if it's not the faster drive when it has hardly any data in it, so slower 2TB drives can actually be faster than supposedly faster 500GB drives when there more than one or two 100GB or so of data being stored. It's best to keep a drive well below about 50% of its full capacity, if even that high.
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May 28, 2012 2:20:49 AM

Then YOU show ME a benchmark. All I hear is yap yap yap.
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May 28, 2012 3:28:24 AM

blazorthon said:
Honestly, I recommend waiting for Ivy Bridge i3s and Vishera (desktop Piledriver CPUs) before buying so that you can chose a next generation low end platform instead of a previous generation platform, but if you're time-constrained, then waiting wouldn't be an option and I'd recommend a Sandy Bridge i3. A simple solution to that would be buying (AMD) a 9xx chipset motherboard with a very cheap Phenom II (maybe an x3 instead of an x4) and upgrading to a Piledriver quad core CPU when they come out or (Intel) buying a Z77 motherboard and a Sandy Bridge Pentium and then upgrading to an Ivy Bridge i3 when they come out.

Whether or not you buy cheap CPUs now and upgrade later or you jsut buy a decent CPU now, I recommend Intel at this time because Intel is consistently on-par with or beating AMD at all price points above $100 or so in performance and is constantly beating AMD in power efficiency (and thus power consumption at a similar or even greater performance level), so Intel is cheaper over time in your power bill. So, I'd have to say buy a decent Z77 motherboard and then either get a Sandy Bridge Pentium (if you want to upgrade to a better CPU later) or a Sandy Bridge i3 (if you don't want to upgrade the CPU any time soon).

For the hard drive, unless you have some sort of deal that I've missed, 500GB drives cost about $80. 2TB drives can be had for $100 to $130. That's over three times the capacity per dollar and doesn't cost a whole lot more. If you know that a 500GB will be enough for you, then don't bother with a higher capacity drive, but if you don't know for sure that a 500GB is enough for you, then get a 2TB drive. Keep in mind that a drive slows down as you fill it up, so you'll need to fill that 2TB drive up a lot more than the 500GB drive before it shows signs of bad speed degradation, even if it's not the faster drive when it has hardly any data in it, so slower 2TB drives can actually be faster than supposedly faster 500GB drives when there more than one or two 100GB or so of data being stored. It's best to keep a drive well below about 50% of its full capacity, if even that high.


i under stand that and this is getting long quoted XD, anyways im using a 500gb hhd in my labtop its got ALL of my games on it and its not even half full so i know i dont need any bigger just i think of it as a bonus and the piledriver amd cpus outa be out in fall, and reason i picked the amd cpu is the fact that i can get a better feature board like this one : http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

P.S.: wish i had noticed i didnt chose discussion topic when i started this XD
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May 28, 2012 5:08:17 AM

Zer0mega said:
i under stand that and this is getting long quoted XD, anyways im using a 500gb hhd in my labtop its got ALL of my games on it and its not even half full so i know i dont need any bigger just i think of it as a bonus and the piledriver amd cpus outa be out in fall, and reason i picked the amd cpu is the fact that i can get a better feature board like this one : http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

P.S.: wish i had noticed i didnt chose discussion topic when i started this XD


Not really more features than Intel, even at that price.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

This board only loses in features by having 2 fewer rear USB 2.0 ports and three fewer audio ports. Unless you want surround sound and/or more than six rear USB ports, the AMD board doesn't have an advantage. This board is the same price as the board that you linked its MIR.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The only problem with this board is that it's a Micro-ATX board instead of an ATX board, so installing two dual slot video cards means that it has no room for other expansion cards. However, this board has two more USB 2.0 ports than the AMD board that you linked and this Intel board also has Firewire and eSATA support, whereas your AMD board does not. This board is also slightly more expensive, but it's only a less than $7 difference, something that an Intel CPU can make up in the power bill and the extra features might make it worth the extra less than $7 up front anyway.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

This board also has two fewer USB 2.0 ports than your AMD board, but this board is equal to or superior to the AMD board in every other relevant area. This board is an excellent overclocking board despite being very cheap, so you know that it's very reliable, especially if you don't overclock or don't have huge overclocks. In addition to that, this board is a new Z77 board, so it has full support for the additional power saving features of Ivy Bridge CPUs in addition to PCIe 3.0 compatibility and more. Not only is it a better board overall than your AMD board, but it's cheaper.

It has an MIR, but even without it, it is still slightly cheaper than your AMD board ($7.56 cheaper, to be exact, an $17.56 cheaper with the MIR). Unless you're willing to sacrifice almost $20 up front, a lot more money in the power bill over a few years, and the higher performance that the i3s offer in gaming, all for those two USB 2.0 ports, this is the better and cheaper board. AMD used to have a serious advantage in motherboard features for the price, but this Intel board takes home the gold in that, at least in my opinion. This plus an i3 or even a top-end Pentium (at stock, Sandy Bridge Pentiums, such as the Pentium G860, beat Phenom IIs in gaming performance for all games that aren't very well-threaded, pretty much all games except for BF3 MP) would offer not only more performance for an up-front cost than a similarly priced AMD build with similar features, but due to Intel's power efficiency lead, it would also increase the difference as time goes on. Over two to three years, you'd have saved enough money to buy a second 7770 for Crossfire.
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May 28, 2012 5:30:20 AM

never found that motherboard when i looked
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May 28, 2012 6:55:35 AM

azeem40 said:
Then YOU show ME a benchmark. All I hear is yap yap yap.


All you hear is "yap yap yap" when someone explains why you're wrong about the 7770 losing to the 6850 by a significant margin, and then goes on to show you how even if you were right about the reference 6850 beating the reference 7770 by a large margin, the non-reference 7770 that I showed still proves you wrong and beyond that, how you used the wrong power usage comparison to make your point? I'd say I'm sorry about that, but I'm not because I explained why you were wrong and then went on to explain how you could have prevented it. Sure, here you go for a little proof:

http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/536?vs=539

Don't forget, that there is a reference clocked 7770 shown to be trade performance victories with the 6850 depending on the game and settings, only significantly losing in Crysis: Warhead and Starcraft II. That's okay because it kicks the crap out of the 6850 in Skyrim and Civ 5 and is right behind or right ahead of the 6850 in all other games. Now, think about a 7770 with a 15% factory OC on the GPU and a slightly over 11% memory overclock:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

This card would be at least 15% faster than, if not almost 20% faster than, a reference clocked 7770. That would put it beyond the 6850 in all games in Anand's benchmark set in that comparison except for Cryis: Warhead and Star Craft II, but it would be much closer in those two games. So, not only is it faster while using less power in all situations, but it is also cheaper than any 6850 on newegg if you include the MIR. As for the pricing, let's also not forget that the 7770 comes with a free game valued at $60, DiRt SHOWDOWN. Beyond that, 7770s have better overclocking capability than 6850s do and the 7770s would still use less power than a reference 6850 even if you overclock them further than this one is factory overclocked. Other than in Crysis: Warhead, Star Craft II, and similarly performing games for these two cards, the 7770 is the clear winner in every way and even in those games, it's still more energy efficient and a higher overclock would let it catch the 6850 while beating the 6850 very much in everything else while still using less power, although the difference would be less pronounced.

Would you like to argue this further?
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May 28, 2012 6:58:04 AM

Zer0mega said:
never found that motherboard when i looked


Do you still want to go with an AMD CPU and motherboard? If so, then a slightly more powerful PSU than you would want for the Intel computer might be helpful, especially if you want to overclock the CPU.
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May 28, 2012 3:26:19 PM

blazorthon said:
Do you still want to go with an AMD CPU and motherboard? If so, then a slightly more powerful PSU than you would want for the Intel computer might be helpful, especially if you want to overclock the CPU.

ima proably get the intel cpu and mobo, but im not overclocking AT ALL dont like voiding warrantys XD and besides my current cpu is 1.06 ghz since its the power saver model of the i5 now im debating on the cases XD, also know if they will have an ivy bridge i3?

edit: i noticed the motherboard dose not have onboard video* not that im going to use it* just i would like to have it as a backup incase my graphics card goes out
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May 28, 2012 6:26:43 PM

Zer0mega said:
ima proably get the intel cpu and mobo, but im not overclocking AT ALL dont like voiding warrantys XD and besides my current cpu is 1.06 ghz since its the power saver model of the i5 now im debating on the cases XD, also know if they will have an ivy bridge i3?

edit: i noticed the motherboard dose not have onboard video* not that im going to use it* just i would like to have it as a backup incase my graphics card goes out


All of Intel's CPUs have integrated graphics instead of on-board. The boards don't have it, but you'd still have integrated graphics just in case you need it. Check the board again and you'll see the integrated graphics D-Sub (aka VGA) port, DVI-I DL port, and HDMI port. Yes, there will be Ivy Bridge i3s. High end or mid-range CPUs usually launches before lower end CPUs. Ivy Bridge i3s should launch soon.
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May 29, 2012 3:07:10 AM

blazorthon said:
All of Intel's CPUs have integrated graphics instead of on-board. The boards don't have it, but you'd still have integrated graphics just in case you need it. Check the board again and you'll see the integrated graphics D-Sub (aka VGA) port, DVI-I DL port, and HDMI port. Yes, there will be Ivy Bridge i3s. High end or mid-range CPUs usually launches before lower end CPUs. Ivy Bridge i3s should launch soon.

k then ima proably go intel if the ivy bridge i3 isnt too mutch more also good case?
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May 29, 2012 5:51:23 PM

Also on the Ivy Bridge i3s, they should have similar prices to Sandy Bridge i3s now, so around the $110 to $150 price range. If something goes wrong with them, then Sandy Bridge i3s would at least come down in price by that time, so it's a win-win situation, even if one possibility (Ivy i3s sucks and Sandy drops price) isn't as great as the other (Ivy i3s are great like they should be and Sandy still drops price).
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June 1, 2012 2:29:50 AM

updated build:
case: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

hhd: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

graphics card: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

PSU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

ram: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... x1

CPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Motherboard: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

2 Cooler master case fans: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

With anti static strap *live in West Texas so ya i kinda need one dry as a bone*, and a HDMI cable *for the tv i have (has 2 HDMI ports i could skimp out on the cable since i use my ps3 with one but oh whell)*.
opinions?
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June 1, 2012 3:02:03 AM

A 2x4GB kit would give you relevant gains over a single 4GB RAM module. If you can't afford another $15 to $20, then it's alright, but I'd do it. Otherwise, it looks good, but I'd skip out on those extra fans. Even the fans that the case comes with should be more than necessary, so getting more would probably not help. Money spent on those fans would be better spent on a 2x4GB RAM kit.
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June 2, 2012 1:14:53 PM

blazorthon said:
A 2x4GB kit would give you relevant gains over a single 4GB RAM module. If you can't afford another $15 to $20, then it's alright, but I'd do it. Otherwise, it looks good, but I'd skip out on those extra fans. Even the fans that the case comes with should be more than necessary, so getting more would probably not help. Money spent on those fans would be better spent on a 2x4GB RAM kit.

ya i know but i need to get at least 1 extra fan for the front intake though, im going to try to have some more money by the time i order so i might be able to get the 8gb. im running 4gb of ram atm its fine for me but id like more if needed, also other than that everything else good?
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June 2, 2012 5:34:39 PM

Zer0mega said:
ya i know but i need to get at least 1 extra fan for the front intake though, im going to try to have some more money by the time i order so i might be able to get the 8gb. im running 4gb of ram atm its fine for me but id like more if needed, also other than that everything else good?


Yes, it looks good. Just be sure that if you plan on starting out with 4GB and upgrading to 8GB that the second module that you buy is the same exact model as the first one to minimize the chances of having incompatibility problems.
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June 2, 2012 6:30:33 PM

blazorthon said:
Yes, it looks good. Just be sure that if you plan on starting out with 4GB and upgrading to 8GB that the second module that you buy is the same exact model as the first one to minimize the chances of having incompatibility problems.

k ill proably grab some amd ram since they wont change the revision of it
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June 2, 2012 6:38:49 PM

That's a good idea.

Good luck :) 
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