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Dell W3507 fans LOUD and CPU HOT

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a b à CPUs
September 11, 2012 5:05:19 AM

Let me start out that I am pretty good with software but I am a hardware noob.

Ever since I got this Dell W3507 around five years ago I knew the fans were loud and seems to rev very high but I never really thought about it figuring it was normal.

The CPU is a Intel Celeron D 352.

Just today I booted into the BIOS menu to change the boot order and happened to notice a selection for hardware monitoring. Just for fun, I selected it and I was quite surprised by the result.

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/600/p1010073zm.jpg...

The CPU temperature showed 75*C and rose up to 83*C in the few minutes I was watching it. As far as I know, this is too hot. The fan was also approaching 5000RPM.

I can provide more details if needed.

Are these temps too hot? If so, how do I lower them?

Thanks.
a c 900 à CPUs
September 11, 2012 11:55:32 AM

Sounds like it needs cleaning with compressed air!
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a b à CPUs
September 11, 2012 6:00:53 PM

rolli59 said:
Sounds like it needs cleaning with compressed air!

Ok I will pick some up soon. But it seemed to run alittle hot even when new.

But yes it does need cleaning.
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September 12, 2012 1:49:27 AM

Unless someone can correct me, I believe that it is rather difficult to change laptop fan speeds and thus affect temperature because the laptop was built to specific dimensions. What you could look into is an external fan base that sits on the bottom of the laptop and cools it that way but I don't know if you would want to invest in something like that.
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a b à CPUs
September 12, 2012 2:01:32 AM

Engima said:
Unless someone can correct me, I believe that it is rather difficult to change laptop fan speeds and thus affect temperature because the laptop was built to specific dimensions. What you could look into is an external fan base that sits on the bottom of the laptop and cools it that way but I don't know if you would want to invest in something like that.

Uhh... It is not a laptop. It is an older desktop.

I also have a laptop that overheats but I use underclocking with a cpu scaler and a fan but that is a topic for another thread.
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a c 152 à CPUs
September 12, 2012 2:16:02 AM

I would clean the CPU fan with compressed air and re-apply thermal paste. I would also use the compressed air to do a general cleaning inside the case including all case fans, air intakes and the motherboard.
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a b à CPUs
September 12, 2012 2:51:13 AM

rds1220 said:
I would clean the CPU fan with compressed air and re-apply thermal paste. I would also use the compressed air to do a general cleaning inside the case including all case fans, air intakes and the motherboard.

Ok I will pick up some compressed air and some thermal paste.

You should know that I have never removed or installed a CPU heatsink before and I am a bit concerned about messing something up.

The last time I opened the case was when I upgraded the RAM from 512 to 1GB about 6 months ago.

Thanks for the suggestions and I will try them when I get a chance.
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Best solution

a c 152 à CPUs
September 12, 2012 3:10:23 AM

Do you know anyone who knows how to do it or a shop that can do it for you? It’s really not that hard but if you are really unsure than I would have someone do it for you.

What you'll need

Rubbing alcohol
Non lint cloth (coffee filters work great)
Good quality thermal paste

1) Remove the heatsink from the CPU. Before you do this you might want to let it run a few minutes BEFORE you take off the heatsink. Sometimes the thermal paste is really sticky and will get stuck to the CPU. If you pull hard enough you could rip the CPU out of its socket damaging pins on the CPU or in the socket depending on the CPU and socket.

2) After that take a dry non lint cloth (like I said coffee filters work great) and wipe off as much thermal paste as you can from both the heatsink and IHS.

3) Wet a coffee filter with rubbing alcohol and start scrubbing. Repeat this step until the coffee filter comes out clean.

4) Apply thermal paste. All you need is a small dot the size of a pea, about 5-5.5 mm's in size. After that seat the heatsink on top of the CPU and clamp it down. There is no need to spread the thermal paste because the force of clamping the heatsink will spread the thermal paste and prevent air bubbles.
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September 12, 2012 12:58:28 PM

Sorry about the laptop confusion, I don't know why I thought it was a laptop. I'm wondering how the airflow through the case is. What's the fan setup for the tower? Can you take some pictures of the inside of the case so we might possibly help you more?
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a c 152 à CPUs
September 12, 2012 11:13:13 PM

My guess is not great. Most OEM's don't have good cooling and tend to run kind of hot.
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a b à CPUs
September 13, 2012 12:22:17 AM

rds1220 said:
My guess is not great. Most OEM's don't have good cooling and tend to run kind of hot.

But it seems like it should not be THAT hot.

I will try to get some thermal paste, compressed air and take some pictures but unfortunately it might be a few days.
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a c 152 à CPUs
September 13, 2012 2:20:03 AM

That is pretty hot. I would clean everything out, re-apply thermal paste and see what happens.
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a b à CPUs
September 24, 2012 11:09:48 PM

Best answer selected by smeezekitty.
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