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Idiot has 2 gtx 480s in sli he hits 91 degrees C in under 2 minutes fans are on

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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March 21, 2012 11:43:53 PM

Hello,
Idiot has 2 gtx 480's in sli, he hits 91 degrees C in 2 min playing Chrysis, fans are on automatic and are loud-is this normal?
a b U Graphics card
March 21, 2012 11:45:19 PM

Seems okay, Crysis is a intensive game. I think 91C for a SLI setup isn't bad.. (iirc)
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March 22, 2012 3:52:41 AM

DOES NOT SEEM OK. 91 degrees C after 2min is terrible. His cards are going to die much faster at that temp. I am sure after a couple hours the GPUs will be even hotter. While I understand they are 480s and they run hot, the guy should run his pc cooler. He needs to check his cable management, room temp, water cool what he can and if not that atleast get some aftermarket cooling for his GPUs. I would die if my GPUs go that high. No matter the GPU I would not want it going over 75-80 TOPS after long amounts of gaming.
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March 22, 2012 3:54:01 AM

AT bare minimum have him download MSI afterburner and Crank those fans up to max and or underclock if he does not need all the power.
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a c 109 U Graphics card
March 22, 2012 4:01:32 AM

These are gtx 480's we are talking about. Temperatures are very normal for 480's. Actually quite good, as 1 480 runs roughly at 90C, though I do recommend an aftermarket cooler for each 480.
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a c 216 U Graphics card
March 22, 2012 4:45:22 AM

The original reference 480's were set to run like that. They are hot cards, and the default fan curve was set to run around 90C and the fans would keep going higher to prevent it going over 95C. That is their default behavior.

You can change the fan curve to make them cooler, and it's probably a good idea to get a really cool case. This is why I would never recommend 480's, but that is their normal behavior.
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a b U Graphics card
March 22, 2012 5:30:21 AM

I guess that's why you're such a Radeon fanboy, Halliburton...
Where's the bacon?
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a b U Graphics card
March 22, 2012 5:44:04 AM

I figured Halliburton was the same troll as longlastPNR or who ever just got banned for being a troll... all the "LOLs" and witty photo bucket pictures with cats and fail. only 250 posts in 3 days.. filling the forums full of knowledge im sure...
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a c 109 U Graphics card
March 22, 2012 5:59:30 AM

Ohmybad said:
I figured Halliburton was the same troll as longlastPNR or who ever just got banned for being a troll... all the "LOLs" and witty photo bucket pictures with cats and fail. only 250 posts in 3 days.. filling the forums full of knowledge im sure...

JimmyBean and LonglastPNR.
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a c 109 U Graphics card
March 22, 2012 6:00:55 AM

DelroyMonjo said:
I guess that's why you're such a Radeon fanboy, Halliburton...
Where's the bacon?

I'm going to do a science project for school soon, to see if you can cook food on the cpu, gpu, and hdd! ;)  I'll be testing eggs, bacon, and many breakfast items!! I am still debating if i want to buy a gtx 480 and try cooking food on there, or use my radeon 5450 silent.
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March 22, 2012 10:13:11 AM

90 degrees Celsius = 194 degrees Fahrenheit

Now if you meant 90*F this is within range.

If you seriously meant celsius... There is no reason that card should be working anymore...and would likely fry your motherboard as well.

Often improperly mounted cards, where they aren't fully inserted into the slots, or mash pins...can cause the cards to heat up excessivly...even if they seem to be functioning properly.

Most pc's are not rated for a room temp higher then 80*F
Regardless i've found that above 70, causes pc's to heat up excessively and break down quicker.

If you don't have an a/c turn up those fans. And underclock if the fans alone don't help keep it under 130*F. If this still doesn't help...buy more solid copper heatsinks...Do try for a return policy...cause you'll want to find the best one...and this is often alot of trial and error.

Be sure to use a silver base thermal paste...or better. Sometime gfx cards don't even have this. If you find this is true for you too...just adding any thermal paste could reduce temp 15-40*F/c

Amuffin...if this is something your actually going to do...best to buy things designed to run hott. And are ultra durable. What that has to do with science and demonstrateing something scientific...isn't apparant to me. But hey if you get an A+ more power to you hehe.
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a c 84 U Graphics card
March 22, 2012 10:21:57 AM

Dust in the heatsink?
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a b U Graphics card
March 22, 2012 10:31:55 AM

pazsion said:
90 degrees Celsius = 194 degrees Fahrenheit

Now if you meant 90*F this is within range.

If you seriously meant celsius... There is no reason that card should be working anymore...and would likely fry your motherboard as well.

Incorrect. 90C on a CPU is bad. 90C on a GPU is business as usual. They get way, way hotter. My 6950 hits 70C under load, and that's considered a very good temperature. It's also got a dual fan design in a case with stupid amounts of airflow (3x 230mm, 1x 140mm, 1x 120mm).

Quote:
Most pc's are not rated for a room temp higher then 80*F

I'd really love to see your sources. I've never in my life heard of PCs being "rated" for a certain room temperature.

Quote:
Regardless i've found that above 70, causes pc's to heat up excessively and break down quicker.

Anybody who keeps their home a 70 degrees is either in a very cold area or spends WAY too much on electricity. Typically homes (in the US at least) are kept at 75 +/- 2. Each degree cooler increases your cooling costs by roughly 8%-10%. Going down to 70, your recommendation, would increase cooling costs by up to 50%. Cooling is by far the single largest contributor to electric bills, by the way.

Quote:
Be sure to use a silver base thermal paste...or better.

And better than silver would be...? In case you didn't know (you clearly don't), silver conducts heat better than any other element, which is why it's used.

Quote:
Sometime gfx cards don't even have this. If you find this is true for you too...just adding any thermal paste could reduce temp 15-40*F/c

So you're saying video card manufacturers just occasionally forget, or decide not to use, thermal paste? Why would they do that? It would dramatically reduce the lifespan of the card, severely limit overclocking headroom, cause tons of problems for end users, increase the fan noise and heat up the inside of the case. Do you really think manufacturers are going to do that to save a few cents on each card?

I'm sorry dude, your post was just FULL of misinformation. Almost everything you said was dead wrong.
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March 22, 2012 10:37:56 AM

pazsion said:
90 degrees Celsius = 194 degrees Fahrenheit

Now if you meant 90*F this is within range.

If you seriously meant celsius... There is no reason that card should be working anymore...and would likely fry your motherboard as well.



While I will agree 90c is too warm for extended gaming sessions, it is by no means so hot it will fry the cards. Especially since their maximum running heat threshold is 105c.

http://www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop-gpus/geforce-gt...

To the poster who suggested afterburner to increase the cooling curve I would like to +1. They will still be noisy, though the temps will be a bit nicer. And yeah, other than benching or running something such as furmark on your cards, crysis is about the most strenuous thing you can throw at em'.
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March 22, 2012 10:44:07 AM

willard said:
Incorrect. 90C on a CPU is bad. 90C on a GPU is business as usual. They get way, way hotter. My 6950 hits 70C under load, and that's considered a very good temperature. It's also got a dual fan design in a case with stupid amounts of airflow (3x 230mm, 1x 140mm, 1x 120mm).

Quote:
Most pc's are not rated for a room temp higher then 80*F

I'd really love to see your sources. I've never in my life heard of PCs being "rated" for a certain room temperature.

Quote:
Regardless i've found that above 70, causes pc's to heat up excessively and break down quicker.

Anybody who keeps their home a 70 degrees is either in a very cold area or spends WAY too much on electricity. Typically homes (in the US at least) are kept at 75 +/- 2. Each degree cooler increases your cooling costs by roughly 8%-10%. Going down to 70, your recommendation, would increase cooling costs by up to 50%. Cooling is by far the single largest contributor to electric bills, by the way.

Quote:
Be sure to use a silver base thermal paste...or better.

And better than silver would be...? In case you didn't know (you clearly don't), silver conducts heat better than any other element, which is why it's used.

Quote:
Sometime gfx cards don't even have this. If you find this is true for you too...just adding any thermal paste could reduce temp 15-40*F/c

So you're saying video card manufacturers just occasionally forget, or decide not to use, thermal paste? Why would they do that? It would dramatically reduce the lifespan of the card, severely limit overclocking headroom, cause tons of problems for end users, increase the fan noise and heat up the inside of the case. Do you really think manufacturers are going to do that to save a few cents on each card?

I'm sorry dude, your post was just FULL of misinformation. Almost everything you said was dead wrong.


+1. Misinformation is the enemy.
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March 22, 2012 11:12:03 AM




::facepalm::

Just because you don't know something and didn't bother to look for the answer...doesn't mean that person is wrong or meant to be misleading...

There is often many specifications for the devices inside a pc...an ambient room temperature, for say a power source Or a Hard drive.

IDC what temps you've accepted as normal...but cpu/gpu/chipset/ram and several other devices that heat up...ALL should be kept below 130*F. For optimal speeds and durability. Anything hotter can cause serious issues. And is indicative of serious errors/flaws in the device itself.

:heink: 

You haven't heard of thermal oils or nano composites have you? There are other materials that are man made or natural that are able to conduct heat better then silver. They are experimental and or very expensive...I'm not trying to discourage looking for or using better materials.

GPU's being sent out without thermal paste...Yes it has been my personal experience that this happens. Yes it would save them hundreds of dollars.
This still happens with new cards i've bought from recommended retailers...But it is not ALWAYS true...

How many Gpu's have you taken the heatsink off of??

Please if you wish to continue debateing this..PM me...don't fill peoples posts with bickering...
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a b U Graphics card
March 22, 2012 12:38:15 PM

pazsion said:
Just because you don't know something and didn't bother to look for the answer...doesn't mean that person is wrong or meant to be misleading...

I never said you meant to be misleading, though you are wrong.

Quote:
There is often many specifications for the devices inside a pc...an ambient room temperature, for say a power source Or a Hard drive.

You said PC, not component. Each component's tolerances will be vastly different. Not a single one will tell you to keep it below 70F ambient temperature, because those temperatures are totally unrealistic.

Quote:
IDC what temps you've accepted as normal...but cpu/gpu/chipset/ram and several other devices that heat up...ALL should be kept below 130*F.

No. You're just wrong here. Go look up the thermal limits for a modern graphics card, they're much, much higher than 130F. Also, different components respond differently to heat, so why would they all have the same limit?

On top of that, I don't think there's a single high end GPU in the world that operates that cool. I can only get my dual fan 6950 down to about 140F if I max out every fan in my system. I'm sorry, but you just have no idea what you're talking about.

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For optimal speeds and durability. Anything hotter can cause serious issues. And is indicative of serious errors/flaws in the device itself.

Again, incorrect. Video cards typically run 70-80C if you've got good temps. 90C isn't uncommon or worrisome on many cards. 100+ is when you start getting into trouble.

Quote:
You haven't heard of thermal oils or nano composites have you?

And you apparently haven't heard that the difference between these supposedly high tech compounds and good old silver based paste is on the order of ~1C under full load. I didn't say they didn't exist, I said they weren't any better.

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GPU's being sent out without thermal paste...Yes it has been my personal experience that this happens. Yes it would save them hundreds of dollars.

How would it save them "hundreds of dollars"? It's only a few cents worth of paste used on each chip, and the price of the vast majority of GPUs sold is in the very low "hundreds of dollars." If you're trying to say the savings add up to hundreds, and they probably would, you've got to consider the scale of things. A few hundred bucks is nothing to a company with millions or even billions a year in operating revenue.

The damage done to their reputation and lost sales they would experience from deciding not to use thermal compound vastly exceeds "hundreds of dollars." It would be an absolutely idiotic business decision. They use cheap, shitty paste, sure, but no paste at all? It's just a horrible, horrible idea. Anyone who proposed a company stop applying paste to its cards to save money would probably be fired on the spot.

Quote:
How many Gpu's have you taken the heatsink off of??

Plenty. Off the top of my head, an x1950 Pro, 5200 FX and HD 4870. In fact, I'm looking at the 4870 right now, which is still without its fan (it burned out, waiting for a replacement to arrive).

Quote:
Please if you wish to continue debateing this..PM me...don't fill peoples posts with bickering...

There is no debate, you're simply saying things that aren't true. 70C is absolutely in no way dangerous to a video card. Ambient temperature does not need to be 70F (in some parts of the world you'd spend enough on cooling in a year to buy a whole new computer). GPUs are not sold without thermal paste to save "hundreds of dollars."

I'm not trying to bicker, I'm just trying to prevent people following astoundingly bad advice, like setting your AC to 70F to prolong the life of your computer.
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a b U Graphics card
March 22, 2012 12:52:08 PM

Because I'm sure you'll just come back with another facepalm pretending you know all kinds of stuff you don't, here are some links to hammer home how wrong you are.

GTX 590 Official Temperature Limit: 97C (206.6F)
GTX 580 Official Temperature Limit: 97C (206.6F)
GTX 570 Official Temperature Limit: 97C (206.6F)
GTX 560 Ti Official Temperature Limit: 97C (206.6F)

So, are you ready to admit you don't know quite so much as you thought you did?
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a b U Graphics card
March 22, 2012 1:21:25 PM

about the only thing Paz got right was the 80*f part, but that is the "suggested" ambient temp for "most" components when at 70-80% humidity. And I think for most people, if you are running a high end GPU a 80*f ambient temp would mean that we are running our cards will above 100*c unless we live in a wind tunnel.

Other than that Willard is entirely right. GPUs idle at 35*c, run at 60-80*c under use, and can easily hit 90*c under heavy use, and this is normal and accepted, and the cards can last for years like this. Going much above 90*c is bothersome... but still within spec.

That being said; I would suggest looking into a few extra case fans, making sure you are not recycling hot air back into the case, and making sure that the computer can breathe proper (pulling in from the front and out through the back), and turning on the AC if it is getting toasty in the room would not hurt either. On the extreme end they could look into aftermarket coolers and water cooling, but to be honest that is more of a way to make things quieter than it is to keep things cooler (though it will help some).
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a b U Graphics card
March 22, 2012 1:32:54 PM

CaedenV said:
That being said; I would suggest looking into a few extra case fans, making sure you are not recycling hot air back into the case, and making sure that the computer can breathe proper (pulling in from the front and out through the back), and turning on the AC if it is getting toasty in the room would not hurt either. On the extreme end they could look into aftermarket coolers and water cooling, but to be honest that is more of a way to make things quieter than it is to keep things cooler (though it will help some).

Elaborating on this, if you have exhaust fans on the back or top of your case, try to point your CPU exhaust at it. This makes sure the hot air coming off the CPU leaves the case as soon as possible. Pointing an intake at your GPU and CPU is also desirable to be sure the air they use to cool is as close to ambient as possible.

Recirculating hot air can cause the air inside your case to become much hotter than the air outside it, and as a result become extremely poor at cooling. The efficiency of an air cooler is directly dependent on the temperature of the air you're cooling with, and the larger the gap between the air temperature and the component temperature, the more efficient your air coolers are.
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March 22, 2012 1:49:48 PM

pazsion said:
90 degrees Celsius = 194 degrees Fahrenheit

Now if you meant 90*F this is within range.

If you seriously meant celsius... There is no reason that card should be working anymore...and would likely fry your motherboard as well.

Often improperly mounted cards, where they aren't fully inserted into the slots, or mash pins...can cause the cards to heat up excessivly...even if they seem to be functioning properly.

Most pc's are not rated for a room temp higher then 80*F
Regardless i've found that above 70, causes pc's to heat up excessively and break down quicker.

If you don't have an a/c turn up those fans. And underclock if the fans alone don't help keep it under 130*F. If this still doesn't help...buy more solid copper heatsinks...Do try for a return policy...cause you'll want to find the best one...and this is often alot of trial and error.

Be sure to use a silver base thermal paste...or better. Sometime gfx cards don't even have this. If you find this is true for you too...just adding any thermal paste could reduce temp 15-40*F/c

Amuffin...if this is something your actually going to do...best to buy things designed to run hott. And are ultra durable. What that has to do with science and demonstrateing something scientific...isn't apparant to me. But hey if you get an A+ more power to you hehe.

I get the 91 degrees C from EVGA precision utility which is installed automatically with the cards (EVGA Advanced Graphics Tuning) on a Acer Aspire Predator AG7710.
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March 22, 2012 8:29:31 PM

mayescrest said:
I get the 91 degrees C from EVGA precision utility which is installed automatically with the cards (EVGA Advanced Graphics Tuning) on a Acer Aspire Predator AG7710.



http://www.guru3d.com/article/geforce-gtx-470-480-revie...

http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/hardware-canucks-r...

http://www.techspot.com/review/263-nvidia-geforce-gtx-4...

Links to review pages with temperature comparisons. I could go on, there are many more. Like willard said above. 91c for a gtx 480 is business as usual.

While I do like precision, it is a nice program, afterburner is better with a more trouble free set it and forget it type fan controller. If you can get past the noise your cards will run cooler without much fuss.
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March 23, 2012 12:34:56 AM

xD these max temps are not very far from what he's running...And thats a game that is years old. It's not too much to ponder how easily it would exceed these temps in other games. we're talking 10-20*F of tolerance. Very tight.

In my experiences these temps can transfer to the slot and board as well...

I'm wondering how much of an improvement he has had with turning up the fans to atleast 80% manually.
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March 23, 2012 12:40:58 AM

Between Willard and Lemlo's responses I am now confident that I can continue the enjoyment I receive from running 2 gtx 480s as opposed to my gtx 260s, The fans don't bother me, I'm busy on my game. Thanks a lot people for the help and direction. The Idiot, mayescrest.
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a b U Graphics card
March 23, 2012 1:05:35 AM

lemlo said:
+1. Misinformation is the enemy.


-1. The post you quote is more correct, but still full of misinformation.
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a c 109 U Graphics card
March 23, 2012 1:12:34 AM

Someone seriously said you don't want to go above 90F? Most pc's sit idle ABOVE 90F.
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March 23, 2012 2:21:00 AM

87ninefiveone said:
-1. The post you quote is more correct, but still full of misinformation.


Well I'm not versed on how much controlling your ambients can effect your power bill, though what he said seems reasonable. Everything else seems in line. Care to clarify?
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a c 109 U Graphics card
March 23, 2012 2:31:13 AM

Quote:
There is really no reason to go GTX 480s not when Radeon HD 7850s are going for $260

No need to use stove for cooking anymore! Use gtx 480's!
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a b U Graphics card
March 23, 2012 11:09:09 AM

lemlo said:
Well I'm not versed on how much controlling your ambients can effect your power bill, though what he said seems reasonable. Everything else seems in line. Care to clarify?

It's not really about controlling ambient temperature, it's just pointing out how insanely expensive air conditioning is.

I'd also like to know about my misinformation as well.
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a b U Graphics card
March 23, 2012 11:48:14 AM

lemlo said:
Well I'm not versed on how much controlling your ambients can effect your power bill, though what he said seems reasonable. Everything else seems in line. Care to clarify?


I think most of the erroneous stuff has already been covered if you read above.
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March 23, 2012 3:47:49 PM

Starting out cold I post 50C on gpu 1
62C on gpu2
usage is 0 on gpu1
usage is 0 on gpu2
If I run Nvidea Island demo:
85c on gpu1
90c on gpu2
Usage is 92 on gpu1
Usage is 71 on gpu2
On Crysis my fans all kicked in and the noise startled me although the game was running smooth as silk. I immediately called up the Evga utility and saw the 91C and figured that can’t be right that’s almost 200 degrees Farenheit. I went to Toms Hardware to see if that was normal, didn’t have a clue. I entered my question and Willard’s comment calmed me down-business as usual. Lemko confirmed Willards comments.
The truth as I see it has nothing to do with graphics per se, but everything to do with directx 11s massive demands on the gpu’s, forcing them to calculate complex algorithms in a fraction of a second and turn them into a visual picture While you and I ponder how to deal with the nine legged swamp monster. The gpu’s get extremely hot and that’s why they come with built in cooling systems. I haven’t been able to retry Crysis because I have to figure out how to make it less than full screen so I can keep an eye on the temp and at the moment I am tied up trying to solve some non pc issues.
Regarding the power draw –if the electric bill is a problem pull one of the gpu’s out-no problem.
I play a few games and If I create a character, I consider it my job to keep it alive. You are not killing my avatar and I don’t care how many teeth you’ve got! I’m in it for fun but with an attitude. Smile, the idiot, mayescrest
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a c 109 U Graphics card
March 23, 2012 5:07:30 PM

Perfectly fine.
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a c 125 U Graphics card
March 23, 2012 6:10:03 PM

Yep as stated, 91C is ok. It's considered high as modern GPUs are now running in the high 60s to mid 70s, but GTX 480s were notoriously hot. Anyway was stated, 100C is when you start worrying and even then it's kind of ok, it won't shut down till components are into the 120C area. My GPUs have crashed with the VRMs at 120C lol... (overclocking).

Anyway, yeah... all good. I'd consider aftermarket coolers depending on what you have installed, though. I replaced my stock 5850 heatsinks (reference/blower design) with Scyth Setsugens and boy are they quiet! I run them at around 1400rpm and temps are around 70C. They can hit 2000rpm though if I am overclocking but they whine at around 1600+

Yep. You're not an idiot!
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a c 172 U Graphics card
March 23, 2012 10:16:51 PM

Personally I would just ramp up the fan speed with msi afterbuner and just live with the extra noise even if the rig sounded like an airliner about to take off. 91c won't kill the cards right away but over time the rest of the card might not do so well but the gpu core could take more than that with ease. I once had a little scare when the power cable to the fan had became disconnected that cooled one of my 9800gt but didn't notice. It got up to 112c until I checked the temps while playing wow, no artifacts and still rock solid. Quick power down and fixed the cable and temps back down into the low 50s.
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March 24, 2012 12:40:53 PM

Well, I called up Crysis (original edition) and went into setup and I discovered that I could adjust the setup. By cutting the display from 1920 x 1080 to 1280 x 800 or so and reducing all the other settings to medium as opposed to letting the built in wizard scan my system for optimum gameplay, I can play quite nicely without hitting 82C. This in a directx 10 game tells me that fan speed in game is dictated not by the game itself but by user input. The reduced display setting primarily was so that I could keep an eye on the temperature. My conclusions are not proof so my next test will be on Skyrim which I will load in a little while.
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a c 216 U Graphics card
March 24, 2012 2:21:38 PM

Running the game in a window will turn off SLI. Your results will now be for 1 video card instead of 2.
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a c 125 U Graphics card
March 24, 2012 8:28:55 PM

Ummm basically you're just making the game look worse so you cards can basically idle while playing. That rather defeats the purpose of having a pair of top end cards.
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March 24, 2012 8:36:07 PM

bystander said:
The original reference 480's were set to run like that. They are hot cards, and the default fan curve was set to run around 90C and the fans would keep going higher to prevent it going over 95C. That is their default behavior.

You can change the fan curve to make them cooler, and it's probably a good idea to get a really cool case. This is why I would never recommend 480's, but that is their normal behavior.

I think i have been lucky with my GTX 480 because my card running Furmark only gets to 85C and it is reference design(latest BIOS installed).
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a b U Graphics card
March 24, 2012 8:43:34 PM

pazsion said:
90 degrees Celsius = 194 degrees Fahrenheit

Now if you meant 90*F this is within range.

If you seriously meant celsius... There is no reason that card should be working anymore...and would likely fry your motherboard as well.

Often improperly mounted cards, where they aren't fully inserted into the slots, or mash pins...can cause the cards to heat up excessivly...even if they seem to be functioning properly.

Most pc's are not rated for a room temp higher then 80*F
Regardless i've found that above 70, causes pc's to heat up excessively and break down quicker.

If you don't have an a/c turn up those fans. And underclock if the fans alone don't help keep it under 130*F. If this still doesn't help...buy more solid copper heatsinks...Do try for a return policy...cause you'll want to find the best one...and this is often alot of trial and error.


Is this a joke?I ran my 8800GT at 100 celcius had it for 2 years and never had problems with it.heck my friend still uses it and is still running after 5 years.You must be confused with something else

Be sure to use a silver base thermal paste...or better. Sometime gfx cards don't even have this. If you find this is true for you too...just adding any thermal paste could reduce temp 15-40*F/c

Amuffin...if this is something your actually going to do...best to buy things designed to run hott. And are ultra durable. What that has to do with science and demonstrateing something scientific...isn't apparant to me. But hey if you get an A+ more power to you hehe.
This must be a joke.I cant even keep my cards idling temps at 90 f.I had an 8800 gt that ran between 95-100 celcius and never had a problem with it infact its still running today 5 years later
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March 24, 2012 10:26:42 PM

wolfram23 said:
Ummm basically you're just making the game look worse so you cards can basically idle while playing. That rather defeats the purpose of having a pair of top end cards.

In response to your comment about making the game look worse, I would say that my display itself is at 1920x1080 although I am game to making adjustments to test my theories. As for the game looking worse, I apologise, I can remember playing both World of Warcraft and Team Apache when 800x600 was all the rage. My interest in pc's dates back to a time when I had to run Pro Engineer, Solid Works, Auto Cad, CD 2000 etc. to make a living. I also spent years designing main frames for the likes of Control Data Corp. and Cray Research. I have no intention of burning out my equipment and when I get seriously pushed I unplug my rig and take it to GeneralNano Systems in the Forbidden City-Mpls'St.Paul for professional guidance.
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a c 125 U Graphics card
March 25, 2012 6:55:58 AM

Oh god don't talk to me about Pro/E! After learning Inventor and Solid Works... now I have to use Pro/E... man I hate that damn program!

Hah anyway, it's all good I'm not going to judge you about how you play your games. I just think with a pair of 480s you are able to run any game maxed out at 1080p so might as well do it. 91C is fine for those cards, if anything you might want to consider improving case air flow or buying aftermarket coolers, or maybe making a custom fan profile in MSI Afterburner (although that will be even louder).

And yeah I played some Diablo 2 with some friends I had over for a LAN just a few weeks ago in all it's 800x600 glory! Good times were had.
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a c 109 U Graphics card
March 26, 2012 4:06:27 AM

If you are worried about your 480's, why don't you just buy aftermarket coolers for them? :heink: 
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