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Yesterday it was cooled...

Last response: in CPUs
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September 14, 2012 12:56:50 PM

at 28c idle, 49c load.

Still 28c idle, but now it reaches 60c load and throttles.

And no, it's not the paste nor the cooler.

Anyone have any idea?

More about : yesterday cooled

September 14, 2012 3:38:19 PM

Oh and the CPU is an FX 8120, CPU Fan Cooler Master TX3 Evo, Paste Arctic.
a b à CPUs
September 14, 2012 4:20:02 PM

Maybe you just put it through more of a load than the last time you checked?

It is very rare, but my cores have gotten up to 60c as well, even though they are usually about 40c.
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September 14, 2012 6:02:12 PM

Raiddinn said:
Maybe you just put it through more of a load than the last time you checked?

It is very rare, but my cores have gotten up to 60c as well, even though they are usually about 40c.


The problem is the fact that yesterday it was at the 49c while playing League of Legends, which is around ... 15% load only.

How the hell can it overheat at 15% load with Dual Fan CPU Cooler, 6 Case fans and the Arctic paste.

And i'm sure it's applied right.

Oh and: The actual problem is the throttle it does all the time, still haven't found the issue.

The issue was temporarily fixed though by having a max temp at 52c no matter what i was playing.
a b à CPUs
September 14, 2012 6:23:57 PM

What case are you using?
September 14, 2012 6:56:12 PM

HAF 932
a b à CPUs
September 14, 2012 7:42:55 PM

Do you have all the fans in there that it is capable of and are they all oriented the right way?

You can test with a sheet of paper if necessary.
September 15, 2012 2:13:31 PM

They are all oriented the right way, the air is pretty cold and is easy to feel, and all is blowing the right way.

Edit: Bottom, back and top fans are all exhaust, side and front intake.
a b à CPUs
September 15, 2012 9:20:43 PM

Are you OCing at all?

It may help to reduce your vCore setting, but I wouldn't mess with this unless you know what you are doing. If you want to try it, I would suggest reading a lot of material about it on the internet before you dive in. This is not a particularly safe thing to do.

Otherwise, the Bulldozer 8000s are just high wattage chips and that means high temperatures by default.

You could try disabling some of the cores too, not sure how many your games need, but they usually can't use all 8.
September 15, 2012 9:54:49 PM

Raiddinn said:
Are you OCing at all?

It may help to reduce your vCore setting, but I wouldn't mess with this unless you know what you are doing. If you want to try it, I would suggest reading a lot of material about it on the internet before you dive in. This is not a particularly safe thing to do.

Otherwise, the Bulldozer 8000s are just high wattage chips and that means high temperatures by default.

You could try disabling some of the cores too, not sure how many your games need, but they usually can't use all 8.


Now it's back to good temps and not throttling, it's killing me. And the only thing i've overclocked is my GPU, not sure how to do it with the CPU.

I like the last suggestion you gave. It wouldn't cause performance issues in games?

And does anyone know what the max temp for the FX 8120 is?
a b à CPUs
September 15, 2012 10:06:17 PM

61c
a b à CPUs
September 15, 2012 10:08:21 PM

AMD chips have an official max of 61c, which is why it throttles at that temperature.

Here is a link to that effect: http://tinyurl.com/93dvz3c

Lowering the vCore - Changing the vCore can cause stability issues, yes. That is part of why I would advise reading up on it before you do it.

Lowering the vCore essentially tells the motherboard to feed less power to the CPU. If the CPU can operate just fine with a lower power than its currently using, then there is no problem.

If the CPU is already on the verge of failing to get the power it needs, then a reduction would put it beyond the break point and cause all sorts of stability problems.

The important thing is the gap between the min and the max for stability. The closer you are to the minimum when you are in that gap, the less heat your CPU will generate.

If you don't feel comfortable messing with such things, that's fine. 99% of people don't mess with such things because there is danger involved and potentially zero upside.

There is also potentially a lot more than zero upside, but you are guaranteed nothing. Each component is ever so slightly different from others of the exact same model so even the exact same hardware can have different results.

There are plenty of other possibilities as for things you can do. You could just accept being throttled dynamically, or you could try a different cooling setup, or stick with the temperature targeting and possibly throttle yourself all the time, etc.

The point is just for you to get into some kind of area you are comfortable with.
September 15, 2012 10:11:29 PM

Raiddinn said:
AMD chips have an official max of 61c, which is why it throttles at that temperature.

Here is a link to that effect: http://tinyurl.com/93dvz3c

Lowering the vCore - Changing the vCore can cause stability issues, yes. That is part of why I would advise reading up on it before you do it.

Lowering the vCore essentially tells the motherboard to feed less power to the CPU. If the CPU can operate just fine with a lower power than its currently using, then there is no problem.

If the CPU is already on the verge of failing to get the power it needs, then a reduction would put it beyond the break point and cause all sorts of stability problems.

The important thing is the gap between the min and the max for stability. The closer you are to the minimum when you are in that gap, the less heat your CPU will generate.

If you don't feel comfortable messing with such things, that's fine. 99% of people don't mess with such things because there is danger involved and potentially zero upside.

There is also potentially a lot more than zero upside, but you are guaranteed nothing. Each component is ever so slightly different from others of the exact same model so even the exact same hardware can have different results.

There are plenty of other possibilities as for things you can do. You could just accept being throttled dynamically, or you could try a different cooling setup, or stick with the temperature targeting and possibly throttle yourself all the time, etc.

The point is just for you to get into some kind of area you are comfortable with.


A thing i would really like to know is, how to disable the throttle? Because you know it makes no sense that it does it at 52c.
a b à CPUs
September 15, 2012 11:03:55 PM

It might be hard to disable that because its meant to keep the processor from melting.

You can check around for some BIOS settings, though. If you can do it you can do it there.
September 16, 2012 10:26:35 AM

Raiddinn said:
It might be hard to disable that because its meant to keep the processor from melting.

You can check around for some BIOS settings, though. If you can do it you can do it there.


Looked a little around and tried some stuff, seems like nothing changes it.

I should maybe just contact AMD, and say it's faulty since it's already doing it at 52c?
a b à CPUs
September 16, 2012 7:31:47 PM

Try it.
!