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AMD Athlon 3200 Socket A shuts down PC, help please!

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  • AMD
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September 15, 2012 10:23:39 PM

Hi

I have an old PC (circa 2003) that has an Abit NF7-S2 , socket A motherboard. I wanted to upgrade its current processor (AMD Sempron 2600) to a better one, Athlon XP 3200. So i bought one on ebay...

I carefully place it into the socket then start the computer but then... it shuts of 5-20 seconds later...
When I put back the Sempron 2600, the computer works without a problem.
As far as I know, the NF7-S2 supports he Athlon 3200 CPU. I even updated the BIOS but it still shuts off if I use the newer processor.
I've also tried 2 different PSUs, one of which was 400 W and the other 800 W.
I messed around in the BIOS too but it didn't help.
The temperature of the 3200 goes up to ~40 after 20 seconds in the BIOS, so I don't think overheating is causing the shutdowns. Besides, the 'CPU auto-shutdown' feature isn't even enabled in the BIOS.

I'm really confused... Why doesn't this new CPU work properly ?

More about : amd athlon 3200 socket shuts

September 15, 2012 10:25:11 PM

Sorry for any typos. Apparently I'm not allowed to edit my own post...
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September 16, 2012 12:25:36 AM

if the new cpu is on this page then it should work but if this cpu is defective you will need to send it back to the seller
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September 16, 2012 12:28:14 AM

scout_03 said:
if the new cpu is on this page then it should work

Sorry, but, what ?
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September 16, 2012 12:46:10 AM

It is on there and as I've already mentioned, the motherboard is compatible with the AMD Athlon XP 3200+ CPU, so in theory it SHOULD work. But it doesn't for some reason (it works for like 20 seconds).
Any more suggestions ?
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September 16, 2012 12:51:55 AM

did you had a fan on it when you try it and thermal paste between the cooler and the cpu if the answer is yes the return cpu to seller
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September 16, 2012 12:53:24 AM

What is your board?
Some did not support the 200mhz bus(400 DDR) for the 3200+

You are using a new heatsink and thermal paste right? The 2600 heatsink may not be enough.
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September 16, 2012 1:06:19 AM

As mentioned above, my motherboard is NF7-S2. In its manual it states that it's compatible with the 3200.

Yes, I'm using the 2600's heatsink but currently i don't have any thermal paste so there is no layer of paste between the heatsink and the CPU (I don't have any paste on the 2600 either, which performs flawlessy. Also, the 3200 is not overheating so i don't think th paste matters at this stage.)
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September 16, 2012 1:08:59 AM

but you will need her for final install even if the cpu are not overheathing
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September 16, 2012 1:51:15 AM

munyosz said:
Hi

I have an old PC (circa 2003) that has an Abit NF7-S2 , socket A motherboard. I wanted to upgrade its current processor (AMD Sempron 2600) to a better one, Athlon XP 3200. So i bought one on ebay...

I carefully place it into the socket then start the computer but then... it shuts of 5-20 seconds later...
When I put back the Sempron 2600, the computer works without a problem.
As far as I know, the NF7-S2 supports he Athlon 3200 CPU. I even updated the BIOS but it still shuts off if I use the newer processor.
I've also tried 2 different PSUs, one of which was 400 W and the other 800 W.
I messed around in the BIOS too but it didn't help.
The temperature of the 3200 goes up to ~40 after 20 seconds in the BIOS, so I don't think overheating is causing the shutdowns. Besides, the 'CPU auto-shutdown' feature isn't even enabled in the BIOS.

I'm really confused... Why doesn't this new CPU work properly ?


My guess is that your PSU is not providing enough juice to the CPU. Most Socket A boards used the +5VDC rail to feed the CPU rather than the +12VDC rail(s) like P4s, A64s, and everything later. The 3200+ draws roughly 30 amps from the +5DVC rail all by itself, and your disk drives and MB draw a little more in addition to that. The 2600+ draws about 2/3 of that. Modern systems draw pretty much everything from +12VDC and the +3.3VDC/+5DVC rails get very little power from modern PSUs because they need very little power on those rails. Your 800 W PSU is guaranteed to be a modern PSU with likely no more than 20-25 amps combined on the +3.3/+5DVC rails whereas an early 2000s good 400-watt-ish PSU probably had 40 amps on the +5VDC rail alone. Modern PSUs also have overcurrent protection which I strongly suspect is kicking in after a few seconds and shutting off the 3200+ but the 2600+ skates just underneath the OCP cutoff which is why it appears to work just fine.

So get yourself an older-spec PSU such as a an ATX v1.x (non-ATX12V) unit with plenty of amps on the +3.3/+5V rails and see if that doesn't help things. Newegg has a few new older-spec units in stock, I'd go hunt them down. I speak from experience- I have fried more than one ATX12V PSU on an ASUS A7N8X-E with a 3200+ before figuring out what I said above.
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September 16, 2012 4:49:26 AM

I missed the board and do not know how, but the thermal paste is VERY important. old CPUs did NOT have built in thermal sensors and board sensors are very inaccurate(and take time to heat up). Board sensors are still inaccurate today.

I highly doubt that a cpu of those days took 30 amps @ 5 volts(I can see that kind of power once the voltage was dropped to the cpus needed 1.5-1.8 range). I mean you are talking about 150 watts(30 x 5). I would guess more in the 15-18 range(75-90 watts). Modern PSU's do indeed have much less 5/3.3 so may be a good place to look.

Time to break out my old Athlon XP's :) 
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September 16, 2012 1:08:47 PM

MU_Engineer said:
My guess is that your PSU is not providing enough juice to the CPU. Most Socket A boards used the +5VDC rail to feed the CPU rather than the +12VDC rail(s) like P4s, A64s, and everything later. The 3200+ draws roughly 30 amps from the +5DVC rail all by itself, and your disk drives and MB draw a little more in addition to that. The 2600+ draws about 2/3 of that. Modern systems draw pretty much everything from +12VDC and the +3.3VDC/+5DVC rails get very little power from modern PSUs because they need very little power on those rails. Your 800 W PSU is guaranteed to be a modern PSU with likely no more than 20-25 amps combined on the +3.3/+5DVC rails whereas an early 2000s good 400-watt-ish PSU probably had 40 amps on the +5VDC rail alone. Modern PSUs also have overcurrent protection which I strongly suspect is kicking in after a few seconds and shutting off the 3200+ but the 2600+ skates just underneath the OCP cutoff which is why it appears to work just fine.

So get yourself an older-spec PSU such as a an ATX v1.x (non-ATX12V) unit with plenty of amps on the +3.3/+5V rails and see if that doesn't help things. Newegg has a few new older-spec units in stock, I'd go hunt them down. I speak from experience- I have fried more than one ATX12V PSU on an ASUS A7N8X-E with a 3200+ before figuring out what I said above.



My 400W PSU has 40 on the 3.3V and 38 on the 5V rail. I can't remember exactly, but the 800W was similar to that, with only +/-2 difference on both rails.
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September 16, 2012 1:13:05 PM

Once again, I'm not allowed to edit my post, so I had to post again:
* 28 A on the 3.3V and 40 on the 5V rail.
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September 16, 2012 2:17:48 PM

nukemaster said:
I missed the board and do not know how, but the thermal paste is VERY important. old CPUs did NOT have built in thermal sensors and board sensors are very inaccurate(and take time to heat up). Board sensors are still inaccurate today.

I highly doubt that a cpu of those days took 30 amps @ 5 volts(I can see that kind of power once the voltage was dropped to the cpus needed 1.5-1.8 range). I mean you are talking about 150 watts(30 x 5). I would guess more in the 15-18 range(75-90 watts). Modern PSU's do indeed have much less 5/3.3 so may be a good place to look.

Time to break out my old Athlon XP's :) 


150 watts is about right. Pretty much everything on those old boards ran on +5V or +3.3V. An AXP 3200+ uses about 75 watts just by itself even before losses by old inefficient VRMs. The PCI slots operated off +5V too, as do disk drive electronics. AGP cards can draw about 45 watts from the slot and I'll betcha it comes from +3.3 V or +5V rather than +12V. That's 150 watts in total right there easily. Pretty much the only things that ran on +12V on those systems were fans and drive motors.
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