Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

CPU overheating issues

Tags:
  • CPUs
Last response: in CPUs
Share
September 16, 2012 5:47:12 PM

EDIT: It turns out that the issue was my GPU being too hot which caused my whole case to get hotter. Hopefully, this helps others who are having trouble keeping their GTX590 cool because they also use 3D.



Hello! I am new here, but for years I have browsed these forums to learn all sorts of things.

Here is my problem:

I built my computer about 2 years ago. I am an independent guitarist/producer, and I make everything myself on my computer. I use libraries of orchestra samples that are literally 800 GB. Needless to say, when I render my tracks, it's very taxing on the CPU.

Recently, I started having a few problems with my music software--it would freeze up, and sometimes force my computer to shutdown. It turns out that this was a software issue. However, when it forced the restart, I noticed something else, the bootup screen said "CPU over temperature error" or something like that.

Since then, I started monitoring my cpu temps and noticed it was idling at 45 degrees! I can't find anywhere online where people say that is acceptable. Under load, the temps were getting to 75 degrees. I decided to order a Cooler Master Hyper 212 plus and I finally installed it last night. When I booted up, my idling temps were 32-36 depending on the core, so I was very happy. However, after a day now, the idling temps are back up to 40 degrees. I still have to see what the load temps are now.

Is there a reason it's already losing effectiveness? Does the thermal paste need some time to "cure" like I've read some other places. I would just like some help keeping my temps safe.

I'll admit, I'm sort of a wannabe computer nerd (compared to people here), but I'm a master Googler, and I've successfully completed many projects that I should have had no business doing! :) 


Possibly relevant info:

my CPU: i7 950
MoBo: Rampage III Gene
Case: Cooler Master HAF X RC-942
GPU: GTX 590 (this is also running a bit hot I think. Under load it gets to 85-90 on games like BF3 and it even idles with one chip at 65 and the other at 70-75 :( )
EDIT: Also, my room temps are low 20s celsius

Maybe it's just that all my parts are prone to running a little hot, so combined in the case they all heat each other up. Any help is greatly appreciated! Thanks!

-Connor

More about : cpu overheating issues

a b à CPUs
September 16, 2012 6:01:23 PM

1. If you overclocked, revert to stock.
2. Have you cleaned old thermal paste with alcohol (preferably 90% or more)?
3. Check that cooler is not lose and all screws are tightened evenly.
EDIT: 4. How much and how did you applied new thermal paste?
m
0
l
September 16, 2012 6:05:51 PM

I haven't OCed anything, it's all stock. There was only a little thermal paste left on the cpu so I just left it (most of the paste was stuck to the old heat sink). I don't think that would be the problem since when I first started it up with the new fan the temps were about 6-7 cooler than they are now.

The screws are tightened evenly. After reading a lot of forums I made sure that the heat sink was properly seated and was making contact with the cpu evenly. Maybe I need to apply more paste? I put on an amount a little more than the size of a pea and spread it evenly. That seemed to be the amount people were using everywhere I looked.
m
0
l
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !

Best solution

a b à CPUs
September 16, 2012 6:16:19 PM

genmills said:
I haven't OCed anything, it's all stock. There was only a little thermal paste left on the cpu so I just left it (most of the paste was stuck to the old heat sink). I don't think that would be the problem since when I first started it up with the new fan the temps were about 6-7 cooler than they are now.

The screws are tightened evenly. After reading a lot of forums I made sure that the heat sink was properly seated and was making contact with the cpu evenly. Maybe I need to apply more paste? I put on an amount a little more than the size of a pea and spread it evenly. That seemed to be the amount people were using everywhere I looked.

You should always clean old thermal paste for best results. Use alcohol preferably 90% or more and cloth that does not leave any threads (coffee filter will work fine).

http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...
Share
September 16, 2012 6:56:21 PM

Does your case have proper airflow? CPU fan(s) plugged in and functional? Double-check CPU volts in BIOS and overclocking software (if applicable). Make sure its stock.
m
0
l
September 16, 2012 6:57:02 PM

How many fans do you have in that case?
m
0
l
September 16, 2012 9:19:43 PM

I'm sure it has good airflow in the case. And I've never done any overclocking so I'm sure the voltages are fine. I don't even know how to OC a cpu.

The case has 4 fans in it I believe. I have it under my desk, but even when I run it out from under the desk, the temps are maybe 1 degree cooler or less.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
September 16, 2012 9:27:21 PM

Have you cleaned the fans? If you havent im betting the vents in front of the fans are crusted with dust, hair, if ya have a pet, whatever.
m
0
l
September 16, 2012 9:34:47 PM

Yes, after I started having cpu temp errors, I took apart my computer case and cleaned out all of the dust very thoroughly.

Also, I just tried running the cpu hard, and while it was rendering my audio, it stayed around 50-55 only, and occasionally going to 55-60.

These are much better load temps compared to what I've had, but I'm still worried that I can't get my idle temps down. I also removed all of the thermal paste and tried reapplying it (I used slightly less this time), but the idle temps are still about 40 for all the cores.

I'm going to try one last time to make sure the heat sink is touching a maximum area of the cpu and that everything is aligned properly, but I'm not sure what else I could try. I will also run the computer with the side open to double check that the airflow is adequate.

I will get back to you...
m
0
l
September 16, 2012 11:06:38 PM

Ok, tried adjusting the heat sink another time, but I'm sure it's on there perfectly.

After rebooting, I left the side off for a while and the core idle temps settled at
34, 35, 37, 33

Then I put the side back on and the temps were
36, 36, 38, 34

Lastly, I slid the computer back under my desk and the temps are now idling at
37, 37, 39, 36

These are definitely better temps than what I had before I got a new cpu fan, but do they still seem high? Considering I have a full size tower with supposedly really good airflow, a pretty good after market cooler for the cpu, and I'm not even OCing at all?

And throughout all these placements for the tower, my GTX 590 stayed at 66 for one chip and 58 for the other. Those seem a bit high too, and I don't know why the one is always a lot hotter. I've read on various forums that people's 590s only get to between 35-45 when idling...
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
September 16, 2012 11:39:51 PM

Keep ample airflow around your case, in other words take it out from under your desk and leave 6 inches of space around each side, front and back and you should be fine.
m
0
l
September 16, 2012 11:44:27 PM

Well now after looking at more stats for my various pieces of hardware, I've found something very interesting.

I'm using EVGA precision to monitor my GTX 590, and I noticed that the core clocks won't go down even though both of the chips are at 0% load. The clocks were both at 630MHz!! That is why the temps are so high on the gpu when it's idling.

I opened up the Nvidia control panel, and the only thing that made a difference was I disabled something called "Maximize 3d performance." I can always turn it on when I play in 3d.

After doing this, GPU2's clock went way down to 51MHz! And it's sitting at 40 degrees only. However, the core clock on GPU1 is still stuck at 630MHz. Fixing the one already lowered the overall temp of my computer, and it even lowered my cpu temp 1 degree. I think if I can get GPU1 to actually IDLE when it idles, then that could drop the temps of everything else another degree or two. Any ideas how to allow the core clock to drop??

Thank you much for all the help guys!
m
0
l
September 17, 2012 12:00:57 AM

Booya! Figured it out! Since I game in 3d, I have a 120Hz monitor. Games in 3d use 120Hz, but I was also using 120Hz at the desktop for every day things. I guess keeping it at 120 causes the clocks to not be able to go down!

I simply changed the desktop settings to 60Hz (already I'm cringing when I move the mouse around fast...) and the core clocks are now BOTH at 51Hz and the temps of both GPUs are around 40 degrees, which in turn, has lowered my cpu temps 3-4 more degrees.

I guess I'll have to get used to switching back to 120Hz every time I game in 3d, but I'm really glad to have this figured out! Thanks guys!
m
0
l
September 17, 2012 12:01:49 AM

Best answer selected by genmills.
m
0
l
!