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Logical View: Haswell or Broadwell

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September 17, 2012 3:04:20 AM

So, I'm looking at building a new computer on the next new platform.

However I'm not sure which way is the most logical choice.

Haswell's pros to me seem to be that it is the 2nd of the 22nm manufacturing. Hopefully meaning that whatever issues that were in Ivy could be fixed. However, the new socket and chipsets could be a problem.

Broadwells pros is that it will be the 2nd generation on the new socket, so fixes are likely. Yet is the first on a new manufacturing process.

The pro of one is the con of the other in trying to compare the two.
I'm not looking at comparing on specs or performance.(Because they don't exist) Whatever comes out I will likely be buying either the best Core i5 or the unlocked Core i7 of their group.

Right now I'm using a Core i5 2500k. I feel lucky that I didn't have the issue of the B3 problems.

So, should I keep on buying 'tocks' or should I step forth and try a 'tick'?

Opinions are great, but if anyone has any news articles that proves that Intel has better history with Tocks then Ticks (or vice-versa) it would be cool. Just for reference I got out of the PC scene when the first Core iX CPUs hit the market and came back right before Ivy Bridge released. So during that gap I have no clue what happened.
a c 478 à CPUs
September 17, 2012 3:34:44 AM

I generally do not advocate "tick" or "tock". I advocate performance. Basically buy a nw CPU when you feel your current CPU is too slow for your needs. I tend to skip generations because I want to get the best bang for my buck as long as my current CPU does the job.

I currently have a Q9450 and I don't plan on upgrading my PC until at least Haswell is released. That's basically because the Q9450 @ 3.0GHz still provides me with good enough performance for my needs. The one weakness would be long video encoding times. That's the one thing I would like to improve with a more powerful CPU, but I don't encode videos as much as I used to. Perhaps that's because it takes longer than I would like, or it is not as important to me as it used to be.

Anyway, depending on how much of a performance increase Haswell will be over Ivy Bridge, I might wait for Broadwell. If I had a Core i5-2500k, then I would not really plan on an upgrade until Intel releases Skylake in 2015.
September 17, 2012 6:50:36 AM

With Sandy, I'd wait for Broadwell. I bet Intel will always release new sockets for it's new CPU's just because it can. Upgrade when you feel like you need/want to.
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a b à CPUs
September 17, 2012 4:39:14 PM

Dunno for sure, but I'd guess Broadwell would be on the same socket as Haswell - 1150 for mainstream. Anyway, Haswell is supposed to be 10%+ IPC improvement over Ivy Bridge, and I'd guess Broadwell would add another 5% to that due to the process shrink.

Broadwell has already taped out and is working, according to an Intel statement at IDF, and Intel expects to hit production levels at 14nm by the end of next year.
a c 136 à CPUs
September 17, 2012 5:03:17 PM

sazyario said:
Broadwells pros is that it will be the 2nd generation on the new socket, so fixes are likely. Yet is the first on a new manufacturing process.

Broadwell will integrate the IO Hub into the CPU so it will most likely require a new socket.

sazyario said:
So, should I keep on buying 'tocks' or should I step forth and try a 'tick'?

Buy whatever you need for the foreseeable future whenever you actually need it.

I do not like having loose spare parts so when I build a PC. To avoid ending up with spare CPUs, I simply pick a CPU powerful enough that I do not expect to feel like upgrading it before the whole system is obsolete enough to warrant a platform (CPU+RAM+mobo) upgrade.
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