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My desktop-pc doesn't restart from standby mode

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September 17, 2012 2:56:14 PM

Hello,
I have the problem that when I put my desktop-pc in standby mode, it doesn't restart when I push the power button. The led lights turn on and the fan starts, but I see nothing on my monitors.
When I push the power button for a few seconds, it shuts down. I have to disconnect and then reconnect the power cable to be able to boot up from scratch. This boot runs without problems.
Does any one have an idea what might cause this problem?

Specifications pc:
CPU Type DualCore Intel Core 2 Duo E7400, 2800 MHz (10.5 x 267)
CPU #1 Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU E7400 @ 2.80GHz, 2799 Mhz
CPU #2 Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU E7400 @ 2.80GHz, 2800 Mhz

MoBo name MSI P6NGM-L (MS-7366)
MoBo ID 64-0100-000001-00101111-072308-MCP73$1ADSY002_A7366NM5 V3.10B2 072308

PSU: FSP Group Inc. Model No.: FSP450-60APN
a b ) Power supply
a c 109 à CPUs
September 17, 2012 2:59:34 PM

How long do you wait when you try to wake it up?

a b ) Power supply
a b à CPUs
September 17, 2012 4:30:19 PM

Not being able to come out of standby mode almost always means bad PSU.

Given that it is an FSP PSU, that reinforces my suspicion.

The problem is usually a decayed and overloaded +5vSB line.

Try taking out everything USB that you can live without and trying to wake it up then. Connected USB devices pull juice from the +5vSB line even when it is in standby mode. Especially if you have a lot of them connected the power might have a tough time getting to the components needed to jump start the PC.

You could also switch out the PSU if you happen to have another one laying around, preferably a more powerful one. That would essentially test the same thing.
Related resources
September 17, 2012 5:00:11 PM

jay_nar2012 said:
How long do you wait when you try to wake it up?

It doesn't matter how long I wait: if I wait just a few seconds or 1 hour or longer, it won't jump start....
September 17, 2012 5:05:45 PM

Raiddinn said:
Not being able to come out of standby mode almost always means bad PSU.

Given that it is an FSP PSU, that reinforces my suspicion.

The problem is usually a decayed and overloaded +5vSB line.

Try taking out everything USB that you can live without and trying to wake it up then. Connected USB devices pull juice from the +5vSB line even when it is in standby mode. Especially if you have a lot of them connected the power might have a tough time getting to the components needed to jump start the PC.

You could also switch out the PSU if you happen to have another one laying around, preferably a more powerful one. That would essentially test the same thing.


I disconnected all the usb plugs to devices I don't need (printer and external hard drives), it still doesn't jump start. So, Raiddinn, what you're essentially saying is, that when I decide to buy (I don't have another one laying around) and install a better PSU, chances are high that my problem will be solved?
a b ) Power supply
a b à CPUs
September 17, 2012 5:33:39 PM

I highly doubt that clearing the CMOS will make a difference, but the cost is $0 if you do try it.

That being said, before you do this, make sure to go into the BIOS and write down what instructions your hard drive is currently using. It will most likely be one of these: IDE, AHCI, or SATA.

When you clear the CMOS, this often changes from whatever it is to IDE. If it does change from something non-IDE to IDE you will have to either change it back to whatever it was before or you will have to do a full system reinstall of Windows and all your programs.

The most time-efficient thing to do is to just change it back to whatever it was before, obviously.

Testing other PSU - You could also try borrowing one from somewhere/someone. Taking your PC to your work and having your IT staff test it (if possible) is another option. If you have an IT staff they might also just let you borrow one of their PSUs. The only thing with this is if all they have is sucky low end DELL PSUs in storage then its probably going to do the same thing as now.

However, I am indeed saying that I do expect it to start working if you do buy and install a different and preferably better PSU. Chances are indeed very high that this will fix the problem. If I had to guess, I would say about 90%+ likely.

I didn't check the links jay_nar supplied, but feel free to do any other $0 tests before you make the new PSU purchase. I fully support doing all the possible testing that might work before making any purchase. I am on as low of a budget as anyone, so I am acutely aware of the value of not buying things you don't absolutely need.

However, as above, make sure you do the tests right and in a way you can easily bounce back from. It sucks to reset the CMOS and then learn that Windows won't boot, especially if you don't know the simple fix that I mentioned above.

- Edit - typo

- Edit 2 - I forgot to mention - I am kinda sad to see that removing the USB devices doesn't allow you to jump start the PC from standby. If it is indeed as I suspect, that the +5vSB has deteriorated to the point that it is no longer up to the task, usually if the test is performed early enough in the process then the PC will be able to jump start. If you have tolerated this problem for a long time, though, then it could have deteriorated too far to even jumpstart with no extra USB stuff connected. That sounds like the situation now.

- Edit 2 cont - However, the fact that the test is inconclusive does point slightly away from a new PSU being the fix. Maybe like 85% instead of 90%. If the test was conclusive, the new PSU would have obviously been 100% likely, but I just really like to have conclusive tests prove one way or the other and with the test not being conclusive the answer is slightly more up in the air than it originally was. I am still quite sure this is the fix, though.

- Edit 3 - I don't suggest just going and buying whatever PSU is on the store shelf, if you do decide to go the new PSU route, though. I would make sure its a good high quality PSU with a safe wattage figure to delay such problems again for the longest possible time.
September 17, 2012 6:03:57 PM

Thanks very much for your extensive information on this, Raiddinn! Unfortunately, I already reset the CMOS before I read your reply. At this moment, I have succesfully put my system on standby and it jump started without usb-devices. Now I'm about to test this with plugged in devices. What's strange though, is that my fan keeps running in standby mode..... I tested it now and the system jump started with plugged in usb-devices.
a b ) Power supply
a b à CPUs
September 17, 2012 6:13:31 PM

Fans that are going crazy are also symptoms of a failing PSU.

You might be able to get away with the current PSU for a while longer, but the same problem will probably continue to haunt you.

That being said, I am glad to be wrong, at least in the short term. That gives you more time to do research into the problem and to confirm/deny my suspicions.

Whatever other weird little things start to happen in the future will probably stem from the same root cause.

At least keep it in the back of your mind that the PSU has a strong likelihood to be the culprit for if/when you have more problems.

- Edit - I just wanted to add that there are a lot of different sleep/standby/hibernate states. Some of them are harder to wake up from than others. If you leave the PC off for, say, 8 or 24 hours it may still exhibit the old symptoms. As time goes on the parts tend to go into a deeper and deeper sleep state, which makes them harder to wake up a lot of times.
September 17, 2012 6:21:23 PM

jay_nar2012 said:
Possibly yes but you could try some other things first.

Try Clearing CMOS (take put the battery from the mobo (switched off obviously) for 5 mins and put it back in shiny side up) or take a look at these sites and see if they help you.

http://superuser.com/questions/49130/why-doesnt-windows...
http://tips4pc.com/computer-repair/computer_will_not_wa...

Thanks jay_nar2012 for your advice. Like I already mentioned in my previous reply, I succesfully managed to jump start from standby mode after resetting CMOS. What's strange though, is that my fan keeps running in standby mode. Before my initial problem started (about 1 week ago), the fan turned off in standby mode.
September 17, 2012 6:32:11 PM

Raiddinn said:
Fans that are going crazy are also symptoms of a failing PSU.

You might be able to get away with the current PSU for a while longer, but the same problem will probably continue to haunt you.

That being said, I am glad to be wrong, at least in the short term. That gives you more time to do research into the problem and to confirm/deny my suspicions.

Whatever other weird little things start to happen in the future will probably stem from the same root cause.

At least keep it in the back of your mind that the PSU has a strong likelihood to be the culprit for if/when you have more problems.

- Edit - I just wanted to add that there are a lot of different sleep/standby/hibernate states. Some of them are harder to wake up from than others. If you leave the PC off for, say, 8 or 24 hours it may still exhibit the old symptoms. As time goes on the parts tend to go into a deeper and deeper sleep state, which makes them harder to wake up a lot of times.


Thanks Raiddinn. I think I'm going to look for a better quality PSU. Do you have any suggestions as to what brand I should choose and how to determine the needed wattage?
a b ) Power supply
a b à CPUs
September 17, 2012 6:40:22 PM

I would need to know full system specifications before I could make a solid recommendation, however, the following brands do tend to be higher quality than the others:

XFX
Seasonic
Corsair
Antec

Only one of those has their own factories, Seasonic, and they make PSUs for all of those brands. Seasonic is also the best PSU brand.

All Seasonic and XFX ones are Seasonic made, however, Channel Well Technology makes some models for Corsair and Delta makes some models for Antec. Both of those makers are less respected than Seasonic is as an OEM.

If you want to do your own research, I would just try to make sure that whatever PSU that you get it is one with Seasonic as its OEM. They are more expensive than PSUs from other OEMs like FSP, Topower, and so on, but its worth it.

As for which wattage to get, if you just google "video card xxx power requirements" it will usually show a link to an ATI or Nvidia webpage that says how much wattage you need at a minimum for whatever video card you have.

You can just look for one of that wattage from one of the before mentioned brands (and make sure it is a Seasonic made one). That would probably be good enough.

Something in the range of 550w - 650w is good enough for most all single video card gaming systems.
September 17, 2012 7:34:16 PM

Raiddinn said:
I would need to know full system specifications before I could make a solid recommendation, however, the following brands do tend to be higher quality than the others:

XFX
Seasonic
Corsair
Antec

Only one of those has their own factories, Seasonic, and they make PSUs for all of those brands. Seasonic is also the best PSU brand.

All Seasonic and XFX ones are Seasonic made, however, Channel Well Technology makes some models for Corsair and Delta makes some models for Antec. Both of those makers are less respected than Seasonic is as an OEM.

If you want to do your own research, I would just try to make sure that whatever PSU that you get it is one with Seasonic as its OEM. They are more expensive than PSUs from other OEMs like FSP, Topower, and so on, but its worth it.

As for which wattage to get, if you just google "video card xxx power requirements" it will usually show a link to an ATI or Nvidia webpage that says how much wattage you need at a minimum for whatever video card you have.

You can just look for one of that wattage from one of the before mentioned brands (and make sure it is a Seasonic made one). That would probably be good enough.

Something in the range of 550w - 650w is good enough for most all single video card gaming systems.



Thanks again! I think I'll go for Seasonic. A full hardware report from Everest Ultimate you can find here: http://shuidao.nl/downloads/120917_hardware_report.htm.
a b ) Power supply
a b à CPUs
September 17, 2012 8:01:27 PM

Something about 450w should be more than enough.

XFX 450w and Corsair CX 430w are both pretty popular entry level high quality PSUs. Either of them should be able to handle the system in the link.
September 17, 2012 9:08:26 PM

Raiddinn said:
Something about 450w should be more than enough.

XFX 450w and Corsair CX 430w are both pretty popular entry level high quality PSUs. Either of them should be able to handle the system in the link.


Raiddinn, thanks a lot so far for your help! I just ordered Corsair CX 430w. As soon as I have that one installed, I will let you know the result.
September 18, 2012 2:16:58 PM

I installed Corsair CX 430w and the system works well. However, the fan still remains running in standby mode. Could this have something to do with resetting the CMOS/BIOS?
a b ) Power supply
a b à CPUs
September 18, 2012 3:39:56 PM

It is possible. I also feel a bit of misgivings because the problem isn't gone. I still think that its a good idea to have done the replacement, but I just wanted to note that.

You could try looking for something regarding sleep states. It will probably have numbers like S3, S4, S5, S6 or so on next to it. You could try adjusting such a setting if you can find one like it in the BIOS.
September 18, 2012 4:04:29 PM

Thanks for your reply, Raiddinn. I will look into the BIOS settings tomorrow, cause the rest of today I have other things planned.
September 19, 2012 6:08:27 AM

I changed the setting from S1 tot S3 (the only two options by the way; I think because I disabled the hibernate function in Windows) and the fan stops now when going into standby mode. Problem solved. Thanks again!
a b ) Power supply
a b à CPUs
September 19, 2012 1:15:20 PM

Glad to hear it is working.
!