Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Temp monitor software

Tags:
  • CPUs
  • Monitors
  • Software
Last response: in CPUs
Share
September 19, 2012 7:02:09 PM

What is the best CPU temp monitoring program. I currently have 3 programs that tell me completely different temps.

This is my desktop at the moment running prime95 for about 1/2 hour.


Uploaded with ImageShack.us
So which one is right?

More about : temp monitor software

a b à CPUs
a b C Monitor
September 19, 2012 7:16:21 PM

I use HWMonitor and usually suggest others do also.

However, there is no be all and end all of temperature monitoring programs.
m
0
l
September 19, 2012 7:20:00 PM

Raiddinn said:
I use HWMonitor and usually suggest others do also.

However, there is no be all and end all of temperature monitoring programs.


Which one is more likely to be more accurate?
m
0
l
Related resources

Best solution

a b à CPUs
a b C Monitor
September 19, 2012 7:40:55 PM

I am not sure you are understanding right what these programs do. None of them calculate anything so none of them can have better or worse accuracy than any other.

The only thing that can measure a temperature is hardware. Hardware on the motherboard, or in a hard drive, or whatever.

All a program can do is collect numbers from various places and display them in various ways.

If one of your programs says 95c on there then it got that number from a piece of hardware somewhere. It is the right temperature most definitely, it might just not know what that temperature is for.

Please also try to understand that each hardware device records and reports temperatures in different ways. There is no one size fits all solution, the processor 1 temperatures on one computer might be in place X and on a second computer they might be in place Y.

Some devices from the same company report in similar ways, but there are no guarantees about that and certainly no guarantees that multiple different companies all report data the same way.

There are real people working on making sure these readings are read and displayed correctly at every program maker's office. Because of this, the programs get better at reading different hardware platforms constantly.

Today for a given software program X might do better, tomorrow program Y might be updated and now it does better.

This is why I tried to tell you what I trust the most and that there really is no best.
Share
September 19, 2012 8:46:34 PM

Raiddinn said:
I am not sure you are understanding right what these programs do. None of them calculate anything so none of them can have better or worse accuracy than any other.

The only thing that can measure a temperature is hardware. Hardware on the motherboard, or in a hard drive, or whatever.

All a program can do is collect numbers from various places and display them in various ways.

If one of your programs says 95c on there then it got that number from a piece of hardware somewhere. It is the right temperature most definitely, it might just not know what that temperature is for.

Please also try to understand that each hardware device records and reports temperatures in different ways. There is no one size fits all solution, the processor 1 temperatures on one computer might be in place X and on a second computer they might be in place Y.

Some devices from the same company report in similar ways, but there are no guarantees about that and certainly no guarantees that multiple different companies all report data the same way.

There are real people working on making sure these readings are read and displayed correctly at every program maker's office. Because of this, the programs get better at reading different hardware platforms constantly.

Today for a given software program X might do better, tomorrow program Y might be updated and now it does better.

This is why I tried to tell you what I trust the most and that there really is no best.


Yeah i understand all that but surely they all read from the same sensors so why do they give different readings?
m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b C Monitor
September 19, 2012 8:53:45 PM

They all read slightly differently for me too (only 3-4C different, in my case), and I never have understood why either, especially the core temps because those should be the same, but I've always gone with the one that reported the warmest, just to be safe.

Edit: As Raiddinn said, sensors can report different things to different programs, but I'd seriously like to know why core temps are different in every progrm. I just don't get that.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
a b C Monitor
September 19, 2012 9:00:30 PM

You say you are getting it, but the question doesn't really reinforce that conclusion for me.

Say you are the a programmer and you come to be aware that there are sensors numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 in the processor.

What would you do with that information?

Put down 1 - 4 as going to cores 1 - 4 and then do what with sensor 5? Maybe sensors 2 - 5 are for the cores and sensor 1 is for something else? Maybe its sensor 2 that's the odd one out and sensors 1, 3, 4, and 5 are for the cores?

What if sensors 1 - 4 are for the 4 cores, but they are in the reverse order so sensor 1 really goes with core 4, sensor 2 really goes with core 3, sensor 3 really goes with core 2, and sensor 4 really goes with core 1?

Even if you know what the sensors are for, how often should you read the data in them? If you read the data as often as possible, then that will greatly impact system performance. Should you do it every second? Every 2 seconds? Every 5 seconds?

Something that sounds incredibly simple to you might not actually be so simple when you have to actually program it.
m
0
l
a c 283 à CPUs
a b C Monitor
September 19, 2012 9:09:58 PM

Raiddinn said:
Say you are the a programmer and you come to be aware that there are sensors numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 in the processor.

What would you do with that information?

Put down 1 - 4 as going to cores 1 - 4 and then do what with sensor 5? Maybe sensors 2 - 5 are for the cores and sensor 1 is for something else? Maybe its sensor 2 that's the odd one out and sensors 1, 3, 4, and 5 are for the cores?


That makes some sense, but, at least for me, the temps are all the exact same distance apart from each other, just higher or lower, so they're all reading the same sensors, they're just reading them differently.

It's not that important (especially since they're not WAY different, for me), it's just something that I've always thought was a bit odd. I guess it really can just be chalked up to different programmers deciding to program and calibrate their programs differently (for whatever reasons they may have).
m
0
l
September 19, 2012 9:15:29 PM

Raiddinn said:
You say you are getting it, but the question doesn't really reinforce that conclusion for me.

Say you are the a programmer and you come to be aware that there are sensors numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 in the processor.

What would you do with that information?

Put down 1 - 4 as going to cores 1 - 4 and then do what with sensor 5? Maybe sensors 2 - 5 are for the cores and sensor 1 is for something else? Maybe its sensor 2 that's the odd one out and sensors 1, 3, 4, and 5 are for the cores?

What if sensors 1 - 4 are for the 4 cores, but they are in the reverse order so sensor 1 really goes with core 4, sensor 2 really goes with core 3, sensor 3 really goes with core 2, and sensor 4 really goes with core 1?

Even if you know what the sensors are for, how often should you read the data in them? If you read the data as often as possible, then that will greatly impact system performance. Should you do it every second? Every 2 seconds? Every 5 seconds?

Something that sounds incredibly simple to you might not actually be so simple when you have to actually program it.


Well when you put it that way it makes more sense as to why they are different considering how quickly the cores change temps.
But surely Intel and AMD would turn round and say 'we have sensors here, here and here and they do this, this and this?
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
a b C Monitor
September 19, 2012 9:37:30 PM

The temperature sensors have to be mechanical so they can exist in hardware.

Think about one of the old timey thermometers that had a fluid in there that expanded when exposed to heat. When you used to look at those things to try to find out what temperature you have, you might have had a tough time determining between, say, 100 and 102 or 103 and 105.

You would have a pretty good idea about where you were at, but it was kinda hard to be completely precise.

The ones in the PC often are the kind that measures input and output voltages. They try to suck down some amount, say 12v, and then record what comes out the other side.

Electronic components have different electrical resistances based upon what temperature something is. So a hot piece of copper conducts differently than a cold one.

Taking what you tried to do originally, suck down the 12v, and the actual current you receive, you can guess what the temperature must be on the wire.

This isn't completely accurate, though. The current on a 12v power cable must fall within a certain range at all time. A 12v rail can deliver anywhere between 11.4v and 12.6v and still be within spec.

If you are looking at an output voltage of, say, 11.3, how do you program it to turn that into a real world temperature?

Do you just assume that the PSU is giving a constant 12.0000v, even though it is usually going to be on a wave pattern with values much higher and lower?

Mind you I am no expert on this stuff and I sure don't do this for a living, but I do have some programming experience and I can guess at some of the problems that people might run into trying to do this sort of thing in the real world.
m
0
l
September 19, 2012 9:49:57 PM

Raiddinn said:
The temperature sensors have to be mechanical so they can exist in hardware.

Think about one of the old timey thermometers that had a fluid in there that expanded when exposed to heat. When you used to look at those things to try to find out what temperature you have, you might have had a tough time determining between, say, 100 and 102 or 103 and 105.

You would have a pretty good idea about where you were at, but it was kinda hard to be completely precise.

The ones in the PC often are the kind that measures input and output voltages. They try to suck down some amount, say 12v, and then record what comes out the other side.

Electronic components have different electrical resistances based upon what temperature something is. So a hot piece of copper conducts differently than a cold one.

Taking what you tried to do originally, suck down the 12v, and the actual current you receive, you can guess what the temperature must be on the wire.

This isn't completely accurate, though. The current on a 12v power cable must fall within a certain range at all time. A 12v rail can deliver anywhere between 11.4v and 12.6v and still be within spec.

If you are looking at an output voltage of, say, 11.3, how do you program it to turn that into a real world temperature?

Do you just assume that the PSU is giving a constant 12.0000v, even though it is usually going to be on a wave pattern with values much higher and lower?

Mind you I am no expert on this stuff and I sure don't do this for a living, but I do have some programming experience and I can guess at some of the problems that people might run into trying to do this sort of thing in the real world.


So effectively, the better your psu, the more accurate it is.
So why do you prefer hwmonitor then if they could all be as accurate or inaccurate as each other?
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
a b C Monitor
September 19, 2012 10:01:49 PM

I just like HWMonitor the most.

Also, its not really fair to say that the better your PSU the more accurate it is. The quality of your PSU does have to do with it, but I don't think there is any switching power supply out there that can keep a constant 12v. I have seen an Enermax that was 1000w+ that was as low as 11.8 - 12.2, but that is as close as I have seen it.

I guess you could call that a better PSU, but plenty of PSUs people out there consider to be really good and their voltage regulation isn't nearly so tight.

A lot of it is the actual programming, because you have to program a temperature monitoring program to account for any random PSU in the computer without a change in code. The program has no idea how good the PSU is so it can't assume everyone is using the most expensive kind.
m
0
l
September 20, 2012 6:20:55 PM

Best answer selected by Devastater6194.
m
0
l
!