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Are battery back-ups safe?

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September 19, 2012 11:45:45 PM

Hey guys I recently purchased a battery back up power supply, but when I got home I realized that it only had a 365 joule rating.
http://www.officedepot.com/a/products/277408/APC-Back-U...

I know that isn't rated for as high as say your normal power strip that has over a 2k joule rating. Is this something to be concerned about? I just want to be able to safely shut down my PC if the power goes out, but do I need to be worried about the low protection rating for power surges or am I missing something?

More about : battery back ups safe

a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2012 12:05:48 AM

The joule rating wouldn't be my primary concern with that unit.

It has a pretty low wattage rating and uses a chopped approximation of an AC signal on back up.

If you have a low-power-consumption computer with an old-school power supply, this unit will be fine for your needs.

If you have a system that draws more than 200w and uses an active PFC power supply, I wouldn't recommend it.
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September 20, 2012 12:33:21 AM

Z1NONLY said:
The joule rating wouldn't be my primary concern with that unit.

It has a pretty low wattage rating and uses a chopped approximation of an AC signal on back up.

If you have a low-power-consumption computer with an old-school power supply, this unit will be fine for your needs.

If you have a system that draws more than 200w and uses an active PFC power supply, I wouldn't recommend it.

Thanks for the reply, and yeah I realized that I am going to have to return it and up the voltage requirements. I have a gaming PC with a 650w power supply, GTX 670, etc.
http://www.bestbuy.com/site/APC---1000VA-Battery-Back-U...
Would something like that be sufficient? Again I just want to be able to ensure my computer is safe and secure during surges and stuff. Your help is greatly appreciated as this is all confusing! :sweat: 
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a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2012 12:53:48 AM

What make/model PSU does your gaming rig have?

If your power supply isn't sensitive to approximated wave forms, the wattage rating will probably suit your needs.

Your PSU will draw more than 650w at full load, (and would be too much for your UPS) but I doubt a rig with a single GTX 670 will draw full power out of your power supply. (The new 6xx series are more efficient than the 5xx series.)

So theoretically, that UPS still isn't enough, but in practice you should be fine. (My two GTX 560's in SLI + mildly overclocked i7 have yet to draw >500w from my UPS.)

This uses a "pure" sine wave and only costs a little more. ($139.99)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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September 20, 2012 1:16:03 AM

Z1NONLY said:
What make/model PSU does your gaming rig have?

If your power supply isn't sensitive to approximated wave forms, the wattage rating will probably suit your needs.

Your PSU will draw more than 650w at full load, (and would be too much for your UPS) but I doubt a rig with a single GTX 670 will draw full power out of your power supply. (The new 6xx series are more efficient than the 5xx series.)

So theoretically, that UPS still isn't enough, but in practice you should be fine. (My two GTX 560's in SLI + mildly overclocked i7 have yet to draw >500w from my UPS.)

This uses a "pure" sine wave and only costs a little more. ($139.99)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
That is my power supply, and I am using a single EVGA GTX 670 with a first gen i7 820. I suppose I am only worried about the in-practice aspect of it. I read something about the "pure" sine wave stuff but does it really matter?
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a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2012 1:28:45 AM

That's a nice power supply. I have the TX750 and love it. However, I have used a sine wave UPS every since I've had the TX750, so I have not tested for how it behaves with an approximated sine wave UPS. (I run the 900w version of the UPS one I posted the link to....it was on sale)



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September 20, 2012 1:35:39 AM

Z1NONLY said:
That's a nice power supply. I have the TX750 and love it. However, I have used a sine wave UPS every since I've had the TX750, so I have not tested for how it behaves with an approximated sine wave UPS. (I run the 900w version of the UPS one I posted the link to....it was on sale)

So the APC UPS version would not work with it then?
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September 20, 2012 2:15:23 AM

Z1NONLY said:
I'm not saying that. I'm just saying I never tested it.

Here's an old thread discussing it. Just glancing through I see "mixed results".

Do you think it's worth just getting the 1000va version or should I just wait and heavily research it? The sooner I figure this out the better. :sweat: 
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a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2012 2:31:04 AM

I'm more paranoid than the average person when it comes to computer stuff, so I would get a PFC compatible UPS. However, that thread shows more than a few people that have had no problems.

It's your call and boils down to your personal risk tolerance.

My experience with my rig makes me comfortable recommending the 600w unit for your particular application.

Since I have no experience with the simulated sine-wave/PFC issue, I'm not confident recommending that particular cost-saving measure.







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September 20, 2012 2:33:29 AM

Z1NONLY said:
I'm more paranoid than the average person when it comes to computer stuff, so I would get a PFC compatible UPS. However, that thread shows more than a few people that have had no problems.

It's your call and boils down to your personal risk tolerance.

My experience with my rig makes me comfortable recommending the 600w unit for your particular application.

Since I have no experience with the simulated sine-wave/PFC issue, I'm not confident recommending that particular cost-saving measure.

So pure sine wave completley rules out the cost saving crap?
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a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2012 11:23:51 AM

The only advantage I can see with the approximated sine wave UPS is that is costs less. So I referred to it's purchase as a cost saving measure.
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a c 121 ) Power supply
September 20, 2012 11:33:56 AM

I am one of those who have seen PSUs shut down on simulated sine waves. Incidentally, the Cyberpower unit is not "true sine," but uses a clipped triangle waveform that crosses 0V in much the same way a sine wave does - continuously, with no "lingering" at 0V the way many stepped waves do. I have a Cyberpower unit, and it is able to power my Antec Signature, which is one of those that will shut down on cheaper APC units.
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